Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: How to not get splinters when working with plywood?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,100
    Blog Entries
    1

    How to not get splinters when working with plywood?

    I am making a shop stand out of plywood. I am also getting splinters by the ton. Is there any way to avoid getting splinters? Gloves?
    If gloves, what kind? Any other suggestions?
    Thanks
    Dennis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,670
    I have been wearing leather palmed work gloves when handling/moving wood and plywood, but not when running machines. Gloves can be a safety hazard when running machines. These leather palmed work gloves usually cost me $1.00 to a $1.50 a pair and are readily available in Tractor Supply, Amazon, Lowes, and Home Depot. I just bought a pair of Kynar knitted gloves with a tuff rubber palm coating that I'm hoping will be even safer and last much longer, but of course, much more expensive at about $10/pair. They are Atlas KV300 gloves and I bought them through Amazon. Again, I don't wear gloves when I'm using woodworking tools because doing so is more dangerous than not wearing gloves, but these new gloves are supposed to be cut resistant, and I hope more splinter resistant. I like the rubber palm coating and think it will significantly prevent slipping. The cut resistant and slip resistant features were my main reasons for purchasing them.

    Working with construction grade plywood is always a splintery situation. You might want to consider spending a little more for better quality plywood, like cabinet grade birch plywood for your projects. It's much nicer to work with, especially when you plan on making cabinets and shop furniture type projects with it. Construction grade plywood quality is awful to work with these days.

    Charley
    Last edited by Charles Lent; 02-09-2021 at 11:54 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    582
    If your getting splinters after the cut you may need a sharper or better quality blade. You could use a sanding block and do a quick swipe before moving. I use mechanics gloves when moving wood and plywood.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    2,270
    Assuming you are cutting on a table saw, using a zero clearance insert will help quite a bit with the quality of the down side of the cut. But even cutting cabinet grade plywood with a plywood blade, you can still have to deal with splinters on one side of the cut. I run a quick pass with a 120 grit sanding block over the cut corners of plywood to knock off splinters.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mt Pleasant SC
    Posts
    708
    +1 on sanding the edge. Also have a pair of micro electronic cutters to pull out the ones barely visible.

  6. #6
    I use rubber coated grip gloves all the time when jointing but not with table saw.

    That said, if I kept the jointer beds coated with wax that would eliminate, but I had a close call with a very slippery bed once.....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,584
    The thinner veneer on so many plywood products these days is certainly contributing to the problem as it's easier to bugger edges and create those sharp, flesh-seeking spikes of pleasure. Plywood with thicker veneers is a better choice, but also adds cost and sourcing fun. I agree that a good, sharp blade, either scoring or a well fit ZCI and care will also help with this.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    456
    Ubiquitous blue painters tape pressed firmly onto the surface works too
    Regards,

    Tom

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    657
    Iím always looking for an excuse to double my workload. Just kidding.

    In this case, you could run the cut over the tablesaw with the blade extended half a millimeter. That will score the outer veneer. Low likelihood of splinters. Then raise the blade and run the board. Itís two cuts, but it might leave you with a cleaner edge.

    This does nothing to help you with the factory edge, however. Put it on the table with gloves on and then take the gloves off before the cut.

    Youíll also need good tweezers and a magnifying light.
    Last edited by Bob Jones 5443; 02-09-2021 at 4:28 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,797
    Rubber grip gloves from horrible fright. I wear them when cutting melamine and plywood on my slider. As well as surfacing on my jointer and thicknessing with my planer. I have very dry skin ,especially in winter and like the extra "traction" I get with these gloves. The added bonus is splinter protection ,and less cuts from sharp edges on melamine.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    2,270
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kees View Post
    Rubber grip gloves from horrible fright. I wear them when cutting melamine and plywood on my slider. As well as surfacing on my jointer and thicknessing with my planer. I have very dry skin ,especially in winter and like the extra "traction" I get with these gloves. The added bonus is splinter protection ,and less cuts from sharp edges on melamine.
    We all wear gloves where I volunteer as we are cutting melamine. I wear the Fastcap Skins. Thin enough to stay skin tight but grippy and tough enough to withstand sharp edges and most splinters.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    4,138
    Blog Entries
    11
    I am putting down a ton of bamboo flooring which is notorious for tiny needle-like splinters. I wear a pair of stretchy fit rubber faced gloves from HD. Like wearing nothing (on your hands), but with the protection. They are labeled Westchester and are day-glo green. Gloves and a saw is not much of a risk, but working with a twist drill, particularly on a DP can be a real safety issue.
    Last edited by Ole Anderson; 02-10-2021 at 10:44 AM.
    NOW you tell me...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,672
    A few years ago I got a splinter on a Sunday and was leaving for a golf trip the next morning. Splinter had to go that afternoon and I could not get it out, so off to the ER. They are surprisingly inept, but after a few hours, mostly waiting, it was done. The bill, $1,000. Insurance paid, but since then I'm a little extra careful.


    I keep a block plane and an ROS handy and touch up all edges all the time. Also gloves when appropriate.
    Last edited by Tom Bender; 02-15-2021 at 3:36 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKean, PA
    Posts
    13,407
    The suggestions regarding zero clearance and high tooth count blades are all good. Train yourself not to slide your hands along any piece of wood. YOu can even be cut by a freshly jointed edge of a board. It's hard to believe that a 90 degree cut can slice your hand, but it can.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
    Posts
    4,141
    Years of heavy use and abuse, aided by extreme hot and cold temps will give your hands a tough leathery armor that makes wearing gloves unnecessary. The ladies find them attractive too I hear

    Mechanics gloves work ok if you want to go a different route.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •