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Thread: 220 vs 240 volt

  1. #1

    220 vs 240 volt

    All - I have seen some cabinet saws advertising 220 v 3 hp and others 240 v up. Do I need to wire my shop differently or does both get treated the same?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by jeff friedman View Post
    All - I have seen some cabinet saws advertising 220 v 3 hp and others 240 v up. Do I need to wire my shop differently or does both get treated the same?
    The technical standard (for what is supplied) is 234 something, but whether you get that depends on where you are along the line, so it rarely happens. Itís all just in that range.

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    They are the same.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff friedman View Post
    All - I have seen some cabinet saws advertising 220 v 3 hp and others 240 v up. Do I need to wire my shop differently or does both get treated the same?
    220, 230, 240v are usually different names for the same power. The numbers have changed over the years, at one time the standard was 220 volt. Sometimes numbers are used out of habit. (Some purists take offense at saying 220v) I think these days 240v is the "nominal" supply voltage with +/- 5% variance allowed for 228V to 252V. Checking with a meter will probably show the voltage varies during the day. In some locations this varies more than others.

    A check of electric motors around my shop showed most of them list 230 volts on the nameplate.

    JKJ

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    Edison chose 110v to power his working lights. Current pushed through lines was based off that, at 110, and 220 volts, until sometime in the 1930's, it was standardized, and upped in voltage to 120, and 240, to better allow for distances of lines. 110/220 is still an old carryover naming for the same thing. My Parents' generation always still called it 110, and 220, because that's what it was when they were growing up, and that has just carried over, now for several generations.

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    Yep, 120/240 for single phase (not derived from a 3 phase system) power. No such thing as 110 or 220 in Canada or US. A 3 phase service, or single phase derived from a 3 phase system is 120/208V.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff friedman View Post
    All - I have seen some cabinet saws advertising 220 v 3 hp and others 240 v up. Do I need to wire my shop differently or does both get treated the same?
    North American power grid is pretty much 240v for residential supply. Marketing materials have never caught up. You'll be fine with gear listed for 220/230/240.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    In school they taught us 1 + 1 is 2. So 110 +110 is 220 so much for that lesson

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    In school they taught us 1 + 1 is 2. So 110 +110 is 220 so much for that lesson
    Actually, the lower voltage is always half the higher voltage in a single phase system. The reason is that the transformer on the pole is center tapped. The voltage between the two outside lines are the higher voltage (240 volts) and the voltage between the center tap and either of the outside lines is 120 volts.

    In the US residential distribution system, the center tap is always grounded. Even when you have a circuit that supplies the higher voltage, the voltage to ground from either side of the supply is half the line-to-line voltage of the circuit. It's a good safety factor.

    In the UK (and I assume other places) three phase is brought to the residential area and a Y transformer system is used. The center tap of the Y is grounded and the supply to the house is taken between one hot line and the center tap of the Y. At least that's my understanding.

    Mike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    In school they taught us 1 + 1 is 2. So 110 +110 is 220 so much for that lesson
    Unless itĒ$ three phase, then 120 + 120 = 208


    Regards, Rod

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    Edison chose 110v to power his working lights. Current pushed through lines was based off that, at 110, and 220 volts, until sometime in the 1930's, it was standardized, and upped in voltage to 120, and 240, to better allow for distances of lines. 110/220 is still an old carryover naming for the same thing. My Parents' generation always still called it 110, and 220, because that's what it was when they were growing up, and that has just carried over, now for several generations.
    Not quite. Edison was the primary proponent of DC power and his system used 110 VDC from end to end. George Westinghouse as the champion of AC power upped the voltages for transmission, making for a much more efficient network, taking advantage of the possibility of step-up/step-down transformers with alternating current. Edison could only distribute within a relatively few miles of his generating stations at 110 v.

    The Battle of the Currents is a fascinating story, putting VHS vs Betamax or Mac vs PC to shame for its viciousness.

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    Thanks. I forgot about the AC/DC wars.

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    I don't think anyone who competed with Edison had an easy life. To confuse things more, some old machines, particularly from the Northeast have old two phase motors or 200v three phase. A vfd handles the 200v but nothing really handles the two phase very well. Dave

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    And DC is likely to replace AC for the large high voltage distribution lines. Less loses with DC & modern low cost electronics needed to change the voltage is removing the high infrastructure cost barrier.

  15. #15
    Didnt Tesla pay part in this? not the business man one but the brilliant one (guess this one is as well). THe old guy always told me when you look for a shop make sure three phase. Now i look out my window and they ran three phase think 50,000 volts forgot across my driveway. When it rained my pole used to buzz like a cicada. I called in and they never showed. Month or two after guy visiting a neighbour said I used to be an inspector and your pole is wired wrong. I told him it buzzes and its burned up top as well, he said dont go near it when its wet. I called back sent photos of the burning and what the guy said and they were here next day. Guy who did the work said some days he is not paid enough. It wasnt the Witchita Lineman.

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