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Thread: next iteration of barn shop floorplan

  1. #31
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    That was a really good idea to use the temporary braces when you installed the two cabinet bases! Nice splash of color, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #32
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    Thanks Jim! I was wondering if others would think that was clever or silly... Totally agree that a little bit of color in my shop was much needed!
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Riefer View Post
    Thanks Jim! I was wondering if others would think that was clever or silly... Totally agree that a little bit of color in my shop was much needed!
    Clever it is. I'm a big fan of separate bases for cabinets because it makes leveling a snap and also provides a point where a larger gang of cabinets (when there are multiples) have a larger tie-together point. When there's a gap, like you have, between cabinets, the bases still need to be on the same plane across the space. Your method is a handy way to facilitate that, perhaps faster than some other methods. IMHO, of course...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #34
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    Thanks Jim! The setting of those tool cabinets did go smoothly, so I would use that method again if a similar situation arose. :-)

    ---

    Lots more done in (and around) the shop over the weekend...

    I installed the dust deputy in the corner near the electrical panel and ceiling mounted supplemental shop heater - it's long been a "dead" space since I need to keep the panel free and the heater impacts head room. But the shop vac and dust deputy fit perfectly, and I was able to take the shop vac hose from that assembly, across the ceiling to my workbench area. I can easily pull the hose down when needed, and just as easily put the hose back up after I'm done. I'll snap a pic soon.

    I also furred out the wall behind the new countertop to accept pegboard that should be arriving tomorrow. I opted for white HDF pegboard sold by Triton, along with a smattering of their 1/4" "Dura hook" accessories. That ugly old wall will look real nice with clean white pegboard holding my most-used tools.

    To the left of the new countertop, I had 14.5" of space before reaching the spot reserved for the sink. I had some MDF laying around and was able to crank out some simple cubbies to fit that space. On top, I charge my batteries and store small items that I use frequently (e.g. pencils, driver bits), and then inside the cubbies I have my drill and driver, circ saw, router, jig saw, one extra space still available.

    The tool cabinets are filled with tools now, and the contents of each drawer is identified using magnetic dry-erase labels. I suspect I'll change my mind a bunch so I didn't want more permanent labels at this time.

    The crew is nearly done with the exterior stairs, needing only to finish the railing at the bottom landing, wrap the support posts in white, install the door at the top of stairs, and make the connections for a barn light above the door. The stairs are above/in the dog pen area and have a bonus feature of creating nice shade spots for the dogs to sit underneath. (Note: The access to the stairs is from the street side, and the bottom railing will separate guests from ever having to walk through the dog pen or interact with our excitable pooches)

    exterior stairs in progress 2.jpg

    Meanwhile, another crew finished repaving our basketball court that sits behind the barn on the other side too, so my teenagers were thrilled to be back playing hoops. Lines will be repainted this week. The crew did a great job correcting for some issues that were driving me crazy, so I'm very happy to see a safe, playable surface getting good use already.

    bball court repaved.jpg

    This week, I will pick away at getting the pegboard installed, and turning my attention to the assembly room which has been "staging zone" during our multi-month home remodel, but can now be emptied back out so that I can use the space. I'm getting to the "I don't want to spend anymore money" stage of the remodel, so I will set the assembly room up "on the cheap" for starters and will then react to needs organically over time as I make incremental improvements.

    Also, once the door at the top of the new stairs are in, I can install the subfloor in the old stairwell / new 2nd floor bathroom area. With that done, the plumber can then come in and install my utility sink downstairs, the water heater, and rough plumbing connections for the bathroom upstairs. I can then slowly work through installing bathroom fixtures as I have time / interest / budget.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  5. #35
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    Got all my pegboard installed by the new countertop, and have begun to "nest" by hanging frequently-used tools to suit my liking. Plenty of space for a one man shop.

    barn pegboard done.jpg

    And, got the bball court lines painted too.

    bball court finished.jpg

    Plumbing in the barn is underway now, so I'll have my utility sink soon, and the upstairs bathroom/apartment will be able to progress too.

    And, I think it's time to buy some lumber for an actual woodworking project now after all these months! Walnut bench build is up next. YAY!
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  6. #36
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    My good-but-slow-as-can-be contractor informed me yesterday that he still could not complete the exterior stairs job (all that remains is installing the door at the top) on our barn because his electrician isn't available until late next week to move a few wires where the new door will be. Naturally, I told him I would move the wires myself if he would come install the door sooner... when he agreed, I set about an ad hoc 4 hours worth of pain in the butt work.

    For one thing... the interior stairwell is still a stairwell... and all of the electrical lines I needed to access are best reached from within this open space. Soon enough, it will have subfloor installed as I begin to convert the stairwell space to a bathroom, but I can't get the darn subfloor material up to that space until the darn exterior door is installed at the top of the new exterior stairs. Arrrrgh. Chicken and egg.

    So... I installed temporary flooring in enough spots to be able to move around in the stairwell (like hopping from one lilly pad to another, only with certain pain below should I misstep). I tore off a bunch of sheetrock inside the stairwell space to access existing wiring - this space will be covered with a shower later, so the surgery was messy but doesn't set me back later. I studied and marked wires until I could determine how to re-route everything.

    My son helped me again. He's nearly 16 now and is getting more helpful all the time. I explain what I'm doing the entire time, and he's picking up lots of useful tips. Between the two of us, we got all the wires moved, tested, and buttoned back up.

    Door install should occur later this week now, and I can then carry the subfloor sheet upstairs, lay it down, and get back to renovating up there.

    ---

    Meanwhile, the shop is as done as it's going to get for now so I have started watching "building Maloof style" DVD's from Scott Morrison. Prashun made the recommendation and after some research I agreed and bought the DVD's.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  7. #37
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    Darn it... after all this work and time, I'm finally getting back to where I can do woodworking (rather than construction) but my foot pain has progressed to the point where I will be getting bone spur removal surgery at the end of October, and that will have me off my feet for about 6-8 weeks (although, the first couple weeks are probably the more "strict", and the tail end of that time may be "walking boot mobility" time).

    So, I plan to power through a couple of other non-woodworking projects in the time I have left... I want to complete the apartment transformation, and have a bilco door situation to take care of. Maybe I can use my downtime to learn some skills I've been neglecting such as sharpening, or how to use hand planes. I think those are things that I could maybe learn about from a sitting position while I heal. Open to other suggestions for woodworking things that I can "learn/practice while sitting in living room".
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Riefer View Post
    Darn it... after all this work and time, I'm finally getting back to where I can do woodworking (rather than construction) but my foot pain has progressed to the point where I will be getting bone spur removal surgery at the end of October, and that will have me off my feet for about 6-8 weeks (although, the first couple weeks are probably the more "strict", and the tail end of that time may be "walking boot mobility" time)…
    Oh no. Best weshes for a speedy recovery.

    Have you used a knee walker? My Lovely Bride has had several foot surgeries including tendon replacement and is in a cast right now with another surgery last week. We would be in trouble with the knee walker. This gives her great mobility with months of “no weight bearing” prescribed. Far, far better and easier to use than crutches. She even uses it often to elevate her foot when sitting.

    She also used it with the boot (as did a friend at our church) since it made getting around much quicker and less effort.

    Most insurance policies will pay for renting one. Fortunately, our insurance bought her one years ago along with a wheelchair, walker, etc. Might ask your Dr if one would be good for you.

    And BTW, this might be a great time to take up chip carving! I found it quick and easy to learn and a great enhancement to a number of projects, mostly woodturning projects in my case.

    JKJ

  9. #39
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    I don't envy you with the foot thing. At some point, I suspect I'm going to have to get my right wrist done just like I did for the left a few years ago...not happy about that because I have less flexibility in the left from original, (and three less bones in my body), but bone-on-bone can be darn uncomfortable. I'm waiting to the last minute for sure!

    As to things to do...maybe spend some time at the computer learning about CAD/CAM for CNC to see if you find it interesting. Vectric has excellent training videos, for example. Perhaps you'll decide to add a machine to your arsenal at some point.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #40
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    Thanks for the suggestions!! I will definitely keep these in mind - I know for sure that I can't just sit around for 6-8 weeks, so having a list of things to learn will help me pass the time. Luckily, I was also able to plan the timing of the surgery such that my fall AAU basketball coaching duties will be finished ahead of time... I think it would be exceedingly difficult to coach effectively from a knee scooter.


    Meanwhile, I finished the apartment and shop work.

    In the shop, it was down to modifying a utility sink/cabinet to fit my needs, and working with the plumber to have that connected. I now have water in my shop! Cleaning, washing hands, refilling my water bottle... such a nice thing to have after over a decade of having to walk back to the house for all of those activities.

    shop sink yayyyyy.jpg

    In the apartment:
    - Replaced carpet in the entry way with luxury vinyl planks
    - Worked with plumber to install shower stall in the old stairwell / new bathroom
    - All sorts of tricks to close in the walls, trim out the bathroom (the barn leans... albeit less than when I bought it.. but still)
    - Painted everything that needed it
    - Installed vinyl roll flooring in that new bathroom
    - worked with plumber to set toilet and vanity
    - set kitchenette cabinets, plumber made connections, installed counter top
    - cleaned, cleaned, and cleaned some more

    apartment entry nearly done.jpg apartment kitchenette and bathroom almost done.jpg apartment crooked bathroom almost done.jpg

    All that's left now are a few things the electrician is finishing up today, and some decorations / nesting.

    This weekend, I will begin the bilco door project.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  11. #41
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    Well, I finished the bilco door project and it turned out nicely in short order... leaving me time to finish up a couple things in the shop.

    First, I built a drill press table with through-fence dust collection (which really sucks... in a positive way). Separate thread on that, but here's pic:

    drill press table with dust collection 1.jpg drill press table with dust collection 2.jpg


    And then, I rebuilt the curtain system for the spray booth area.

    Basically, the room with the spray booth now has a water heater in the corner, so I needed to adjust the path of the curtain tracks for that reason already. Additionally, I always was annoyed that it was difficult to access the man doors in the room when the booth was open... so, another reason to adjust the track setup a bit.

    To simplify the curtains this time, I added a permanent solid panel beneath the vent... previously the curtains covered that area, which required the curtain to feature a cut out in the middle to fit around the vent fan. Looks much nicer now I think.

    And... with the new shape of the booth, I was able to make it very easy to nest the curtains when breaking the booth down.

    Total setup or shut down time is about 15 seconds... reach behind fan area to open window glass... undo bungies holding curtains back.. slide curtains out... turn on fan. Done.

    Remains to be seen if I will need one more length of curtain to the left/right of the work table. It's really such a rough and tumble room, that minor overspray on surfaces bothers me very little... so I'll see how messy it is and decide about the extra panel then.

    All in, I was able to use 100% stuff I had on hand, so $0 new cost on this one. I feel like it's a much better execution of the idea than my first try.

    Shop spray booth 1.jpg Shop spray booth 2.jpg
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris Cook View Post
    Just read through this thread and glad to see you are back underway. I have a stalled out project at home as well but for different reasons. I did something similar with my bandsaw dust collection a couple of weeks ago but I necked down to 4" for the upper collection point. I will be home this next week so hope to get some work done on the shop and the dust collection is on the list. I will post pictures of my bandsaw mod if I get it completed.
    Finally got my DC up and running and as promised, here are a couple of photos of my bandsaw modification for dust collection. I used a 2-1/2" two-hole conduit clamp to hold the hose in place. I had a plastic clamp and was going to drill and countersink some holes in the table but I realized if I used a metal clamp I could use magnets, which is what I did. Magnets are rated at 16lbs of force and I put two on each side. Right now they are held in place by their own force. I will probably epoxy them to the clamp for safety.

    20211207_163927small.jpg



    20211207_170513small.jpg
    Regards,

    Kris

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