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Thread: Sideways filter?

  1. #1

    Sideways filter?

    Is there any issue with installing the filter for the cyclone sideways? I'm thinking I might want to put the filter up in the rafters of my garage, instead of hanging up and down on the wall, taking up valuable space.

    Is there any issue with this? The only thing that I see as an issue is it seems like the filter was designed to be cleaned while horizontal, with a set of brushes inside the filter, but I can probably just shift it that way every few months.

  2. #2
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    Most of the filters are designed with a bag or some kind of catchment container at the bottom of the vertical filter to catch the particles that enter the filter (i.e. didn't get captured in the cyclone). Positioning the filter in a horizontal configuration would mean that you'll end up with dust sitting in the filter.

  3. #3
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    Can you? Yes, you can. But Dave is correct that most dust collection cartridge filter systems have some kind of catch container on the bottom of the filters (when oriented vertically) that provide a place for minor blow-by material that escapes the cyclone. This is less issue with long-cone designs than short-cone designs...but an air leak or forgetting to empty the bin can send a whole bunch of material to the filters.
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  4. #4
    Yeah, forgot about the bag. OTOH, in the time I had it hanging on the wall, I didn't see much in the bag at the bottom. FWIW, I've got a long cone cyclone. Grizzly G0443.

  5. #5
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    Another thought....Even if you don't forget to empty the drum ever, your filter will need to be cleaned of the very fine particles that make it past the cyclone and pack the filter. You can do this with compressed air, or with a mechanical paddle if yours has one, but with the filter horizontal I suspect most of it will just settle back on the filter and get packed in when you next run it. Even having to climb up to hit it with compressed air would be a pain with it up in the rafters. How often you have to do it depends on what type of work you're doing and how much, but it could be pretty often, like once a week. Now if you want to move the cyclone up high and just have the drum and filter down below....that should work.
    Last edited by Paul F Franklin; 01-21-2021 at 10:09 PM.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    Yeah, forgot about the bag. OTOH, in the time I had it hanging on the wall, I didn't see much in the bag at the bottom. FWIW, I've got a long cone cyclone. Grizzly G0443.
    My Oneida is similar, but instead of a small bag, it's a small steel canister that clamps on the bottom of the filter. There's rarely anything in it that matters.. unless I've been stupid. That unfortunately happens once or thrice a year.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    Not sure I would go horizontal with this type arrangement. As others have mentioned, you would need to deal with the particulate that gets past the cyclones. If this lays in the bottom of your sideways filter, it effectively reduces your filter area, which will reduce filter life.

    Sure, there are filters turned sideways. Donaldson has a collector called a Downflow I think that uses cartridges turned on their side. Our company had one we marketed in the 80s with horizontal cartridges / pleated bags. However, one major difference is that these industrial collectors had the dust on the outside and the clean air on the inside of the cartridge filter. These collectors also use compressed air to clean the filters automatically to maximize the filter life and uptime.

  8. #8
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    Keep in mind that you can also extend the outlet for the filters away from the cyclone location if there's a "more better" place it could hang in your shop. You just need to use the same or larger duct out to the filters. I have my outlet extended about four feet so that the filter does not block the service panel as my compressor is next to the cyclone where the filter might normally hang. While mine is currently 4' extended, I'd have no second thought about making that farther in a future shop if the situation warranted it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    That's a good idea Jim, I'll check and see what it would mean to hide it under the rafters in a place where I can mount it vertically instead. Might add another 15' to the run, but might be worth it for keeping the draft down, I'll think about it.

  10. #10
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    I was going to suggest that, but didn't know it it was just ceiling rafters with a floor above or something "truss like" where you have space above. As long as you keep the duct work "generous" in size so it flows cleanly, it will work fine. Just be sure you can physically get to the filters without killing yourself to clean if you have one of "those moments" and pack 'em full of stuff...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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