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Thread: Hachet Recommendation

  1. #1

    Hachet Recommendation

    Hey all,

    I'm going to try to find wood in the wild while walking. The goal is to make bowls, spoons, etc, so the hatched will be used to harvest small felled wood and then cut it to size. Can you recommend a high quality hatchet? I'm thinking carbon steel blade and hickory handle, if possible.

    Something that looks nice and rustic would be nice, too.

    Also, where would one buy a hatchet head? I was thinking I could buy a high quality one and then make the handle as an option.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Serna View Post
    Hey all,
    I'm going to try to find wood in the wild while walking. The goal is to make bowls, spoons, etc, so the hatched will be used to harvest small felled wood and then cut it to size. Can you recommend a high quality hatchet? I'm thinking carbon steel blade and hickory handle, if possible.
    Something that looks nice and rustic would be nice, too.
    Also, where would one buy a hatchet head? I was thinking I could buy a high quality one and then make the handle as an option.
    Thank you.
    Hello John!

    This page might have some ideas: https://www.outdoorlife.com/11-best-...and-tomahawks/

    I'm a bit partial to SOG although they may not fit your desire for "rustic"! My favorite is the SOG Tactical Tomahawk on that page, a gift, which I like for the feel and the point on the other side which I use more that I thought I would. I have another SOG that is a bit more compact. The steel in these is excellent. I use these in the shop, around the farm, and in the woods but I'm not so sure about using it to harvest turning blanks and such - seems like a lot of work!

    What I prefer when cutting branches and even small trees by hand is an arborist's saw. I've bought several of these: Silky Zubat https://www.baileysonline.com/silky-...sky-72233.html
    These are fantastic and can quickly cut through some fairly big stuff. The scabbard makes it easy to carry too. I keep one in my little 4wd utv for use around the farm - small tree down and such.

    If you haven't browsed Bailey's, I think they are great. They may even have axe heads.

    JKJ

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    Can't say I'm expert. The guides & instructions I've seen suggest a cross-cut saw for harvesting wood, like JKJ suggested. Something I read suggested: Folding Trail Saw and it works very well for me.

    As far as hatchets for spoon carving, the suggested use I've always seen is for roughing on harvested blanks. I suspect most small hatchets could be made to work, though Gransfors seem to be most widely available of the recommended (in the Sloyd tradition, at least) small axes. They tend to be pricey, at least in a beginner's eyes. One specifically designed for carving and to be economical is from Woods Tools in Sheffield England, it is: Robin Wood Carving Axe. It was designed by Robin & Jo Jo Woods to suit all carvers. As I understand it they use Chinese sourced forgings to keep the cost down and then finish them using tradition techniques in Sheffield to insure quality.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Hello John!

    This page might have some ideas: https://www.outdoorlife.com/11-best-...and-tomahawks/

    I'm a bit partial to SOG although they may not fit your desire for "rustic"! My favorite is the SOG Tactical Tomahawk on that page, a gift, which I like for the feel and the point on the other side which I use more that I thought I would. I have another SOG that is a bit more compact. The steel in these is excellent. I use these in the shop, around the farm, and in the woods but I'm not so sure about using it to harvest turning blanks and such - seems like a lot of work!

    What I prefer when cutting branches and even small trees by hand is an arborist's saw. I've bought several of these: Silky Zubat https://www.baileysonline.com/silky-...sky-72233.html
    These are fantastic and can quickly cut through some fairly big stuff. The scabbard makes it easy to carry too. I keep one in my little 4wd utv for use around the farm - small tree down and such.

    If you haven't browsed Bailey's, I think they are great. They may even have axe heads.

    JKJ
    This is great info, thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by David Bassett View Post
    Can't say I'm expert. The guides & instructions I've seen suggest a cross-cut saw for harvesting wood, like JKJ suggested. Something I read suggested: Folding Trail Saw and it works very well for me.

    As far as hatchets for spoon carving, the suggested use I've always seen is for roughing on harvested blanks. I suspect most small hatchets could be made to work, though Gransfors seem to be most widely available of the recommended (in the Sloyd tradition, at least) small axes. They tend to be pricey, at least in a beginner's eyes. One specifically designed for carving and to be economical is from Woods Tools in Sheffield England, it is: Robin Wood Carving Axe. It was designed by Robin & Jo Jo Woods to suit all carvers. As I understand it they use Chinese sourced forgings to keep the cost down and then finish them using tradition techniques in Sheffield to insure quality.
    This is also great info. Thank you.

    That Woods one looks nice and is affordable, but I'd rather pay more than support China. I will look into the others. I'm willing to spend a bit to avoid China and get something that will last a lifetime.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Serna View Post
    ... That Woods one looks nice and is affordable, but I'd rather pay more than support China. I will look into the others. I'm willing to spend a bit to avoid China and get something that will last a lifetime.
    You're welcome.

    I understand having problems with Chinese products, but before you make a final decision read the "Story" page at Woods Tools and, if you're on Instagram, checkout their pages. (Robin Woods and Woods Tools feeds both have company information, (depending on mood?), and JoJo Woods' feed has wonderful spoon carvings.) Yes, they use Chinese materials, but they also are bringing tool manufacturing back to Sheffield, England and employing traditional craftsmen as masters to train apprentices. Of course it's your evaluation that matters.

    If price really doesn't matter, I have never seen the Gransfors not recommended. They're available from LV and others.

  6. #6
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    I have the Estwing featured as #9 on this list: https://www.outdoorlife.com/11-best-...and-tomahawks/. I've had it for 10 or 15 years.


    The steel is quite good. That is to say it takes a great edge and is very durable. The ergonomics are good too, at least for my hand.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  7. #7
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    Apr 2009
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    I bought the Marbles Camp axe after doing some research. It got very good reviews by a lot of actual hatchet connoisseurs, which I am not. Was considered very highly rated, especially considering the cost. I used it a couple month ago camping to cut and split wood and it did great. It's the Marbles MR701SB on Amazon. I wanted a Hatchet that didn'ty break the bank, but wasn't disposable eaither. I didn't need anytthing tricked out. With any kind of special weaponry or attachments. All in all, so far it's been great.

  8. #8
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    I bought a Gerber Gator combo hatchet and am very happy with it. Comes with a scabbard and a knife in the handle.
    It fits your not made in China criteria.

  9. #9
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    i have had maybe 10 small axes. I like my Fiskars and it stays in my truck at all times. the Gerber is the same as the Fiskars. the SOG stuff is pretty meh when you get outside the multitool or knives. I have the hatchet/shovel/folding saw combo in my camper. Gransfors is by far the best, and brings great joy when using it. a beautifully constructed tool that works even better than it looks. a tool that brings with it a sort of satisfaction when used, that something lesser and plastic can not bring to the table. I would suggest the "small forest" for your use.

    https://www.gransforsbruk.com/en/pro...ll-forest-axe/

  10. #10
    Thanks for all the advice, guys. What do you think of this one? I came across it in research.

    https://www.manmade.co/collections/a...atural-hatchet

    It's 1.5lbs, 14", and has a 1080 blade and hickory handle. It seems very ideal for my use, and has that rustic look.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Serna View Post
    Thanks for all the advice, guys. What do you think of this one? I came across it in research.

    https://www.manmade.co/collections/a...atural-hatchet

    It's 1.5lbs, 14", and has a 1080 blade and hickory handle. It seems very ideal for my use, and has that rustic look.
    I guess I'm not sure of your use. Since this is in the carving forum I jumped to the conclusion you were looking for something like I see in the Sloyd spoon carving guides. That doesn't look like them.

    For a camp hatchet it looks nice and I'm sure it could be used for carving. I can't find any reviews or reference to it other than the vendor's site, which is concerning to me. There are enough established respected brands I don't think I'd take a chance, but since it appeals to you, you might find yourself with a new better option. Please post a review if you decide to try it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Serna View Post
    Thanks for all the advice, guys. What do you think of this one? I came across it in research.

    https://www.manmade.co/collections/a...atural-hatchet

    It's 1.5lbs, 14", and has a 1080 blade and hickory handle. It seems very ideal for my use, and has that rustic look.
    it looks like a standard American style head, which has quite a wedge from sharp end to handle hole. the swedish style has a much thinner blade and bulbs out at the handle, this makes it harder to split logs, but that's not what a tool this size is for, its for more precise work. the thinner cross section makes chopping easier, and allows for more control of the angle of your hits.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by David Bassett View Post
    I can't find any reviews or reference to it other than the vendor's site, which is concerning to me. There are enough established respected brands I don't think I'd take a chance, but since it appeals to you, you might find yourself with a new better option. Please post a review if you decide to try it.
    I will review it if I get it. There are a ton of reviews for it on Etsy, and it the maker gets rave reviews.
    https://www.etsy.com/listing/4986064...n-made-hatchet

  14. #14
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    I have several gransfors bruks axes and hatchets, big fan of them, hard to beat their quality.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by John Serna View Post
    Thanks for all the advice, guys. What do you think of this one? I came across it in research.

    https://www.manmade.co/collections/a...atural-hatchet

    It's 1.5lbs, 14", and has a 1080 blade and hickory handle. It seems very ideal for my use, and has that rustic look.
    I just wanted to come back and say I got this hatchet, and it's awesome. Used it a lot already because I had some yard/home projects, and it's holding an edge great. Feels awesome in the hand. Hickory handle and very hard steel blade.

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