Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Custom sized kerf with table saw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Colrain MA
    Posts
    60

    Custom sized kerf with table saw

    Anyone know a method of getting a .135 kerf with a standard table saw blade in one pass? Some sort of wobble shims? Cuts are shallow and don't need to be all that pretty....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    614
    Wobble? Sounds scary. How about using a shim for the second cut? I have a set of plastic shims 5" by 20" in fourteen thicknesses from 0.0005" to 0.030". That's what I'd use for this. If my blade give a 0.0125" kerf, the second cut would be with a 0.010" shim against the fence.

    What are you cutting and how long will the cut be?

    Short of owning the specialized tool, what else is 0.010"? Maybe a specific number of paper thicknesses? Do you have a 0.001" caliper to calibrate your shim?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Colrain MA
    Posts
    60
    Several hundred cuts......, maple, only 12" long each. Single kerf is also more accurate than 2. I have an old Oldham wobbler, and it works great near its smallest setting, but that's .15". I might just experiment with tape on the arbor faces, or on blade near periphery of arbor faces. Don't need much wobble for that extra .01"!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,606
    Aluminum foil is less likely to crush.. Good luck keeping it dead flat and not wrinkled. Maybe take a much thicker washer and grind the angle into that. just realized you need two parallel faces not one wedge.
    Bil lD

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,505
    Amana makes 10" blades with kerf widths that are not .125". Here's one which is .135" -- https://cherrytreetoys.com/10-amana-...cut-saw-blade/

    Google with .135" kerf. Here's a $63 blade on Amazon spec'd at .135" kerf.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    653
    If they don't have it, i'd guess that Carbide Processors could make it. Looks like he carries 13 different stock .135" kerf, but they are all 12" and up. And you could spec the grind as well--important if you need flat bottoms.
    earl

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Colrain MA
    Posts
    60
    Thanks, prompted by these suggestions I delved all the way into my stock of blades and found an old Freud 7 1/4" combination planer blade with the right kerf! The tape shim wobble idea goes untested for now!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,606
    Any reason not to set the teeth on a non-carbide blade to increase the kerf?
    Bil lD

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,187
    Quote Originally Posted by al ladd View Post
    Thanks, prompted by these suggestions I delved all the way into my stock of blades and found an old Freud 7 1/4" combination planer blade with the right kerf! The tape shim wobble idea goes untested for now!
    The single piece of shim between the inside washer and saw blade works very well. I use a piece of paper instead of tape, but have done it many times. Mark Duginske used to say a pad of Post-It-Notes makes a wonderful shim pack. That's where I learned the technique.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,240
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Any reason not to set the teeth on a non-carbide blade to increase the kerf?
    Bil lD
    That would be a "not fun" task to come up with something that's actually balanced, especially since a lot of those non-carbide blades, when you can find them, are somewhat thin.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,588
    glad you found a solution. Keep in mind that even a custom blade with .135 teeth won't leave the same kerf. If I really needed .135 in one pass, I'd spec a blade at 9/64 .140, put it on the saw and check the kerf which will be wider. Then do the math and have a sharpening service adjust the tooth width to account for the runout on the blade and arbor. Dave

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    614
    Call me nuts but a second 12" cut with a piece of paper against the fence sounds the least taxing overall.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Dana, Masachusetts
    Posts
    206
    Custom tooling can seem expensive, but I have found that saving three hours pays for it.When it works for another job it makes even more sense.
    I use Connecticut Saw and Tool.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,187
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Jones 5443 View Post
    Call me nuts but a second 12" cut with a piece of paper against the fence sounds the least taxing overall.
    He's talking about several hundred cuts. That's going to wear out quite a few pieces of paper.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    4,375
    Or kick your fence off square a few thou and your kerf will grow but you'll have slight rad on the sides if the kerf

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •