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Thread: Is there an easy way to trim hardwood glued to plywood edges?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Joyce View Post
    Table saw cuts close enough to sand.

    Attachment 449885Attachment 449886
    In my experience today's hardwood veneers are so thin it's impossible to send hardwood edging flush. I vowed to never again use commecial hardwood veneered plywood. Instead I saw my own veneer and vacuum bag it to baltic birch. That ply in the picture looks like from 30 years ago or it's custom.

  2. #32
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    Nov 2009
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    Depending on the size of the piece I intend to trim, I will generally migrate towards my router table and flush trim bit. I have an Incra jig for cutting DT's on the table, and it's perfect for clamping the piece to, and keeping it 90 deg to the table.

    But....after seeing John TenEyck's jig below, I'm totally stealing his idea and making that jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    OK, here are a couple of photos. The key is to make sure the outer edge of the router bit is in the same plane as the shoe that rides on the panel, or just a smidgeon shy.





    John

  3. #33
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    The Festool MFK700 is limited.

    A guy, Paul (I think) who goes by Half-Inch-Shy on YouTube, did do a video on what to do to modify the MFK base to allow a bit more capacity, but I think it was only to 3/4".

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Pfenning View Post
    Thank you to everyone who posted. The all the solutions are great. I think I will give the FastCap Lipper a try. I'm really temped by John TenEyck's jig, and the Festool MFK700EQ. My only reservation with the MFK700, is the limited cutting depth. One of my projects in process is a record shelf. I have Sapele veneered plywood with solid Ash to wrap the plywood edges with. My Ash edge wrap is 1.25" x 1.25". The Festool live video I watched last night, said the max depth on the MFK700 was 5/8". Does anyone know if I could use the MFK700 to flush cut 1.25" deep in 2 passes?
    You won't be able to do this with the MFK700EQ. This is the main drawback of the tool, which I really like otherwise. I just had a similar situation where I couldn't use the Festool, so I used a handplane. It went well and was kind of fun. Had the piece not been huge, though, I would have set up my router table to do the job.


  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian W Evans View Post
    You won't be able to do this with the MFK700EQ. This is the main drawback of the tool, which I really like otherwise. I just had a similar situation where I couldn't use the Festool, so I used a handplane. It went well and was kind of fun. Had the piece not been huge, though, I would have set up my router table to do the job.

    You just pointed out both advantages of the WoodSmith jig. It can flush fairly wide edging and it works on any size workpiece. I've used the one I built to flush edging at least 1-1/4" wide. If I were doing stuff that wide regularly I would design the jig for a 3/4" or 1" diameter piloted router bit. Normally, I'm just trimming 1/4" or thinner edging and for that the 1/2" bit works fine.

    John

  6. #36
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    Use a flush trim bit and a shop-fabricated router table jig -- see below video – to easily trim plyw’d edging.

    My shop experience is that rather than balancing a hand-held router jig to trim the edging, it is easier to trim the edging on the router table with its dust control and a high fence to support the stock.

    Before applying the glue and the banding, apply painters tape to both side of the plyw’d to catch any glue squeeze out. I also have a dedicated flush trim bit that is only for edge trimming.

    https://www.wwgoa.com/video/trimming...table-000340/#

  7. #37
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    Mar 2019
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    That’s a nice jig! Thanks. I’ll have to save a picture, but a small trim router would be perfect.

    I clamped a double piece of scrap to the veneered plywood to allow the router to have some bearing and covered the edge of the veneered plywood with several pieces of masking tape so the bearing would be slightly proud of the edge and I wouldn’t chew into the delicate veneer at the edge.

    I have also used a simple bench plane to trim the edging, again using several pieces of masking tape to protect the delicate veneer.
    Regards,

    Tom

  8. #38
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    Feb 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Jensen View Post
    That ply in the picture looks like from 30 years ago or it's custom.
    I hadn't thought about it til I saw your post, but you're probably right about the age of that plywood.
    It may be over thirty years old. This was seconds or culls from a company that made plywood for Hatteras Yacht.
    My dad used to buy a truck load at the time. We had an 18' flat bed at that time. I sorted it as I unloaded it and kept the best for myself.
    I've got Mahogany, Teak, Afromosia and odd pieces of other species. Lots of 1/4" & 1/2" with other thicknesses from 1/8" to 1".
    Good times. Anyway it makes nice shop cabinets.

    As side note I have a 40 X 80 building lined with 1/2" teak, ain't that a hoot. It was cheaper at that time than buying liner.

    Thanks for reminding me about this.

    Tony
    "Only those who have the patience to do simple things perfectly will acquire the skill to do difficult things easily.”
    Friedrich von Schiller (1759-1805)

    "Quality means doing it right when no one is looking."
    Henry Ford

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    SoCal
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    I have a PC trim router baseplate that has two levels. The lower level sits on your workpiece for control and the upper, cantilevered level sits high enough for the router bit to clear the wood. I have what looks like a spoilboard bit set to the width of a business card above the reference surface. Works a treat but it took me over an hour to get the bit height exactly correct Hasn't been changed in the last 5+ years) bit it is noisy and dusty.

    The other method I've used is a fenced rabbet block plane, although a regular block can be used. This method is faster to set up (unless you have a router jig ready to plug in & go) and gets the job done quickly and quietly. Since you can remove material at as little as .001" per pass, the block plane method can be more accurate.

    IMO & YMWV

  10. #40
    You can try to match the plywood by using the same wood species or use a different kind of wood to add contrast. Then again, simply glue it on and you can use tape as clamps. Once it's dry you can trim it to final size and flush it up so it's the same thickness as the plywood.

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