Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: Sell This House

  1. #1

    Sell This House

    On the Dabl network is a show called "Sell This House." Hostess is former Ms Canada (eye candy). The houses they show are priced right, but generally cluttered, decorated wrong, or need some small renovations to make them attractive. They do hidden camera open house, recording buyers comments and showing them to owners. Roger, the staging director can make just a few changes, and the house sells. Most make overs are less than $2000 in materials. He makes a duck turn into a swan.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,628
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    He makes a duck turn into a swan.
    Outside of a Swan, the most comfortable bird is a Duck.

    Inside of a Swan, it's too dark to see.

    (With apologies to Groucho)

  3. #3
    Sounds like a good show, especially if you are preparing to sell.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,112
    I'm not familiar with that show...or network...but the premise is sound. Sometimes, only a few minor adjustments will take a property from sitting on the market to multiple bids and a sale. It's always a good idea to get someone else's eyes on the situation, too..."we" can sometimes be our worst enemies because of the subjectivity involved with our own homes.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    22,932
    Blog Entries
    1
    Never forget 'curb appeal' many potential buyers are swayed by the outward beauty or lack of it.

    Though there are those buying to flip and they look for just the opposite of curb appeal.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mt Pleasant SC
    Posts
    655
    When I was a home inspector there were some agents that wanted their sellers to get an inspection before listing. This is generally a good idea but finding an inspector to do it is harder because the seller does not want to pay much. The most frequent items that cause buyers to walk and out of budget for sellers are wet moldy crawlspaces, multiple failed seals in foggy windows, leaky tile showers ($5k+) and often houses have 20 plumbing issues, 10 electrical issues and HVAC units on their last leg. Buyers see some of this but once it’s on paper reality hits. I have seen agents outright lie about repair costs and sometimes just say the inspector is wrong. They get bottom feeder contractors that “fix“ these houses to downplay the serious foundation and drainage issues. Inspectors hate doing reinspections because only half the items are usually fixed and emotions are running high at this point. The buyer now has lots of money into the deal which is how it works, so they often cave in and buy it. I had a buyer on a two mil house that didn’t even read the report because they wrongfully assumed the agent would.
    Last edited by Bruce King; 01-18-2021 at 1:42 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,112
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Never forget 'curb appeal' many potential buyers are swayed by the outward beauty or lack of it.

    Though there are those buying to flip and they look for just the opposite of curb appeal.

    jtk
    True on both accounts. One thing that is always listed as potential selling cost is updating landscaping, paint and (interior) staging. And as a potential buying within the next year, I'm actually wrestling with the the "buy nice at a higher price" or "buy to fix". Our criteria for each would likely be different for sure.


    ------

    Bruce, I bet you saw all kinds of "interesting" things in the inspection business, sometimes very scary things!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,561
    I am in the process of buying a newer home. One criteria is the fixes for the first 6 months, until the old house is cleaned up and sold, have to be cheap in materials but my time can be long. I will run cables, install extra outlets, maybe pex if needed etc. But the expense of concrete sidewalks or a new roof will have to wait until I have the cash from the previous house in hand. I can keep plenty busy for six-twelve months for $500-1,000 in materials.
    Duct sealing in the attic will only cost $24 dollars for a tub of mastic but provide hours of pleasure crawling around in fiberglass. Lots of stuff up there like that before insulation blowing happens.
    Bil lD

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKean, PA
    Posts
    13,287
    When we sold our first house the realtor advised us to repaint all the rooms so there were no marks on the wall and to use neutral colors. She also advised to have the carpets cleaned, the grass neatly cut and trimmed, etc.

    If a room has tons of furniture, it appears to be much smaller than it really is. Many people can only see what tehy see and cannot imagine what the same space would look like with their furniture in it.

    When we were shopping for our new home, one place we looked at had a finished basement "man cave" with some art work that was of questionable taste painted on the walls. That was a real negative, because it would have to be covered before we could move in if we purchased the home. Fortunately we found a much nicer home in a different area closer to where I was going to work that had many more positive things on our list.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  10. #10
    I guess new paint is good. But if you listen to real estate people ,yeah, they always mention "neutral colors". What that
    really means is "you are a peasant and I knew that the moment I met you. So I can't let you pick the color. " Neutral usually ends being beige,and only
    black can make a house more drab. Here's a tip, tell that agent : "I think I might have to replace you with the guy whose
    picture is often seen in the news paper standing in front of a wall full of "Top Salesman" awards. THAT will make stuff
    happen !

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,112
    I think that's a bit strong, Mel. The recommendation for neutral colors is more pointed at homes that have bold colors on the walls in some rooms. What an individual might feel is "cozy" for their own tastes when they use deep or garish colors can often make a room feel much smaller or off-putting. The ideal is "lighter and airier". from a presentation perspective, so in addition the beige that you clearly love, it also means creamy colors, light greys, etc., with trim colors that don't have huge contrast. The most successful real estate agents don't make these recommendations to tear folks down...they make them to help sell a property faster and for more money.

    I suspect when we prepare this home to sell within the next year, the master bedroom, which is very large but painted a deeper sage color, will have to be lightened up for staging. The rest of the house, fortunately, doesn't have a lot of bold color in it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    22,932
    Blog Entries
    1
    But if you listen to real estate people ,yeah, they always mention "neutral colors". What that
    really means is "you are a peasant and I knew that the moment I met you. So I can't let you pick the color. "
    Any light color easy to paint over with a single coat is what neutral color means to many people.

    Hopefully real estate people know what sells. They get paid quick if a property sells quick.

    Painting rooms bright red or deep purple might not be drab, but it will turn off a lot of buyers as they imagine how many coats of paint they will need to keep it from showing through.

    When we sold our first house the realtor advised us to repaint all the rooms so there were no marks on the wall and to use neutral colors. She also advised to have the carpets cleaned, the grass neatly cut and trimmed, etc.
    Sounds like good advice. Many buyers will want to repaint every room whether it needs it or not. Clean walls give a very different impression than walls with scuffs and other various marks. Some folks will be reluctant to buy if every room needs to be painted before they move in as opposed to being able to paint each room over time after they move in.

    A yard that isn't 'neatly cut' can make potential buyers wonder what else the owner let go to pot.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New Westminster BC
    Posts
    1,632
    In addition to buyers thinking they will have to repaint, bold colours also distract them from the permanent features of the house. Rather than remember the great fireplace in the living room and huge island in the kitchen etc. they will walk away thinking about the purple walls in the master bedroom and lime green bathroom.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mountain City, TN
    Posts
    536
    Before we sold our house ( 5 years ago) my wife hired an interior decorator. Man, was that ever worth it!
    The decorator made all the decisions on flooring, paint color, etc. An added bonus, she knew what subs to hire. ( For flooring).
    She also "Staged" the house when it went on the market. The house looked great.
    We had three offers after two days, all above asking price.
    The designer and upgrades more than paid for themselves.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Sounds like good advice. Many buyers will want to repaint every room whether it needs it or not. Clean walls give a very different impression than walls with scuffs and other various marks. Some folks will be reluctant to buy if every room needs to be painted before they move in as opposed to being able to paint each room over time after they move in.
    The purpose of an interior decorator is to advise on what color of wall best shows off the furniture. If they have any reason to live at all. :^)

    Yes, a good quality coat of fresh paint is a major selling point. Details matter.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •