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Thread: Sliding table saw

  1. #1

    Sliding table saw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siizGKx-Kk8

    Hi all
    For those of you who have siding table saws and have used the Fritz and Frons, I think spelling wrong but you know I mean. About have way through video the operator demonstrates how to use the Fritz and frons. This was very interesting for me who loves sliding table saws and only has a sliding table attachment which I'm thankful to have. You may have seen this man before. Hope you find it encouraging and helpful. Thanks for looking, Bob

  2. #2
    I bought a slider mostly to be able to crosscut wider stuff easier and accurately. Once I got it I learned it would do so much more. I wonder if this guy in the video will be trading his Felder for a Martin in a year

  3. #3
    Also, I must be doing it all wrong. My shop never looks that spotless. But then I never wear a suit to work in.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Titusville, FL
    Posts
    95
    The Fritz and Franz jig is essential with a slider... You can buy them premade, or you might want to look at Steve Rowe's youtube video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0Py...remeWoodworker

    He shows you how to make one and has a bunch of other video's on how to use your slider that will really help.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mt Pleasant SC
    Posts
    667
    Looks like an advertisement. Especially suspect when he says a 25k saw will pay for itself in a few months as compared to a cabinet saw. Looks like it takes longer to cut wood.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Titusville, FL
    Posts
    95
    While I agree, demoing his Felder slider in a suit, in a shop with floors that looked clean enough to eat out of is suspect. Sliders are incredible. Used standard table saw for 30 years before I got my first slider and now I would not go back.

    Don't need track saw to break down plywood.
    I can do miters / angles.
    It is worlds safer, you stand to the side, not in back of the blade.

    With the Fritz & Franz jig you hands never get close to the wood. I can make veneer strips in seconds. In fact unless I'm cutting a long piece of wood or breaking down sheets, I pretty much have the jig on the table saw the entire time.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce King View Post
    Looks like an advertisement. Especially suspect when he says a 25k saw will pay for itself in a few months as compared to a cabinet saw. Looks like it takes longer to cut wood.
    You'd have to see a professional operate one to understand.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce King View Post
    Looks like an advertisement. Especially suspect when he says a 25k saw will pay for itself in a few months as compared to a cabinet saw. Looks like it takes longer to cut wood.
    At first glance, it might seem that way, but without the context of the cutting being done, it's not assured either way. But regardless, there are so many of us that wouldn't give up a true slider and go back to a cabinet saw. Yes, sometimes we take more time to do something that might seem simpler to do on a North American style saw, but there are benefits to that, too...more repeatable precision, elimination of the need to edge joint in many cases, no hands near the blade when using the slider wagon to support material, etc. It's just different, that's all, and different isn't bad.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    NH seacoast
    Posts
    259
    I like safety. Have Martin slider and a Sawstop. The Martin is my first exposure to a slider and I have quickly fallen in love. Need to make one of those F&F jigs

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mt Pleasant SC
    Posts
    667
    I can push an 8ft ply sheet through my saw without any roller stands with extension and side tables. I can straighten the edge of a crooked board too. I don’t doubt it’s a fine machine and I could by one but I don’t see the logic for a one man shop. Maybe if I was under 45 I would get some fancier tools. My tools don’t slow me down at all, it’s the age.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,785
    Bruce I hear what you are saying. However I have to say that I bought a slider at 50 and it has definitely been worth it for me. I do make my living out of my shop and I realize that everyone on this forum is not in same situation as me.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce King View Post
    I can push an 8ft ply sheet through my saw without any roller stands with extension and side tables. I can straighten the edge of a crooked board too. I don’t doubt it’s a fine machine and I could by one but I don’t see the logic for a one man shop. Maybe if I was under 45 I would get some fancier tools. My tools don’t slow me down at all, it’s the age.
    Aging is precisely what makes a slider essential to me. Muscling sheets over a cabinet saw is a young man's game. Multiple stops and the rip fence means I can break a sheet down into components without lifting the matertial onto the saw multiple times. I can break a sheet down into cabinet parts in a couple of minutes, with little effort. This means I can turn 20 to 30 sheets into parts in an hour or two. Time is your most valuable resource, especially for a smaller operation where delegation is not an option.

  13. #13
    Got this all figured out. The OP should have purchased a CNC router with three conveyor tables. One being routed. One waiting to be routed, and one being off loaded. Then he should have a sheet storage area close with a vacuum jib to load the sheets and mobile carts for the finished pieces. Wonder if I could get all that in my shop?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cache Valley, Utah
    Posts
    1,619
    I used conventional table saws, including Saw Stops, for nearly 50 years. I got a Minimax SC4E at 66 years of age for the convenience and safety. Steve Rowe, AKA Extreme Woodworker has some excellent You Tube videos including several on the Fritz and Franz jig. Sam Blasco, one of the sales reps for SCMI/Minimax also has a number of excellent videos and does a great job of showing how a pro uses a slider in a working shop. He has an alternate take on things and uses a parallel positioner instead of a F&F jig. I use both.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    2,057
    This thread compelled my to visit the Felder and SCM websites. And I thought Thomas Lie-Neilsen ran a crack house! I need to save more money for retirement toys.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

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