Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Downed Apple tree; what are it's project strengths?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    410

    Downed Apple tree; what are it's project strengths?

    My 80+ year old apple tree died a few years ago, and yesterday I noticed it has fallen on it's side.
    It's a huge thing, and although a lot of rot, still, there's some good wood there. Waste not, want not, I'd like to make the decent parts into a few projects.
    There's much more than I'll ever be able to use in my smoker or BBQ, and I have a lot of Alder for my salmon smoking anyway.
    What use can I put this legacy tree's to?
    Young enough to remember doing it;
    Old enough to wish I could do it again.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Rosenthal View Post
    My 80+ year old apple tree died a few years ago, and yesterday I noticed it has fallen on it's side.
    It's a huge thing, and although a lot of rot, still, there's some good wood there. Waste not, want not, I'd like to make the decent parts into a few projects.
    There's much more than I'll ever be able to use in my smoker or BBQ, and I have a lot of Alder for my salmon smoking anyway.
    What use can I put this legacy tree's to?
    Yard trees are usually not good for woodworking. They often have metal in them in unexpected places, and they are riddled with reaction wood. It might make some pen blanks or blocks for turning, but IMO that’s about it. OTOH you now have a bonanza of apple smoking wood! You can really go to town with that. Smoke ‘em if you got ‘em. You might consider building a bigger smoker.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    410
    LOL! Doug, it's not how much I can smoke, it's how much can I EAT!!!
    Young enough to remember doing it;
    Old enough to wish I could do it again.

  4. #4
    I had a similar tree from my parents yard. I slabbed the solid part with a chain saw. The wood was gorgeous. I only had enough for a few small boxes which turned out real nice and had some family value too. If I had ti do it again I would have talked to someone with a band saw mill to see what he could do as my crude methods waisted wood. More about family value than $ value. But to me that is more important.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Katonah, NY
    Posts
    183
    Fruit tree wood, especially Apple, make great stock for the making of archery self bows - if you are so inclined. Green is better than dried, but still good none the less.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,722
    Around here, stores sell bags of apple wood chunks for smoking. I calculated once that it was a lot higher price than apple lumber by the bf. Maybe worth selling it that way.
    I tried to salvage some wood from a dwarf apple once, and it was a lot of work for a little bit of usable wood. So I'd consider it more of a question of how much time you want to put into it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    469
    Made Christmas boxes and turned bowls from plum, apple. and pear--Cotlet's anyone?? Logs were ~8" in diameter and resawed nicely on my bandsaw. They had been stored in a basement for years and were very stable vs green fruitwood. The plum had amazing color and I used a ~1/2" thick NE 30"+ section for a table runner for the holidays, Friend made a cribbage board and two runners as well.
    I am in Seattle and I would gladly mill it for you when they open the border. ((21" BS @ 14" resaw ht.))

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,191
    Fruit trees require careful attention to drying to keep them flat, but the material can be really beautiful. I have a hunk of crab apple that I had to take down this past fall and intend to have it milled when I get some other logs done.

    The scraps, BTW, can be good for smoking meats.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,343
    I had milled them into small boards for small projects.

    Some of the most beautiful wood you will ever find.......Rod.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,580
    Apple is used for saw handles and carved for casting patterns.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    7,194
    Apple is one of the hardest fruitwoods I know of. It's difficult to mill and loves to twist and split when it dries. My planer protested when I planed some. Cherry and pear are far nicer to work with in every regard. Turning projects are where I'd look to use it.

    John

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    819
    You might also use the root ball which may contain interesting grain patterns. They are a beast to clean however.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    2,409
    Beautiful turning stock, but a bear to dry without cracking. Very much worth it if you succeed.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ellsworth, Maine
    Posts
    1,690
    Apple can be a nightmare to dry but if you end up with some usable stock it is absolutely my favorite wood. It's really difficult to find good sized boards of Apple. I've only been able to make a couple small boxes and some spoons out of the Apple I've got a hold of. But like I said before, it is such a beautiful wood to look at and work with.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON Canada
    Posts
    1,375
    If you can't use it all, you may want to talk to a local turning club. Apple makes fine bowls.
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •