Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Any Jigsaws out there with a quick shutoff brake?

  1. #1

    Any Jigsaws out there with a quick shutoff brake?

    Hi, I am looking for a good quality jigsaw that has an automatic blade brake once the power is turned off (rather than wait for it to cycle down a few seconds). This is for some repeat cut I have to make and lift the tool each time and fit back into a pilot hole, which ends up costing me time not to mention mistakes in case I am impatient
    Thanks!
    Last edited by Erez Perelman; 01-13-2021 at 11:58 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,014
    Blog Entries
    1
    This made me curious so I had to go and check. Both my Ridgid cordless and my Bosch 1590 stop immediately when the trigger is released. The only other jig saw I had any long term exposure to was the typical cheap-o Skilsaw jumping jack that really isn't a tool at all. I do not recall ever having to wait for it to wind down either. Are we sure we're talking about jig saws here?
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    575
    That is some kind of impatience. I don’t think that would be a feature on any jig saw. My Bosch probably stops in about a second. I do have to think about letting it stop before I pull it straight up out of the cut.

    Dan

  4. #4
    Thanks for the responses. I checked out a youtube video and saw the Bosch 1590 run a couple seconds still after turn off. But it looks like a quality machine.
    I was considering Festool, but also saw some bad reviews, so not sure what to go on.
    Regarding the impatience- its just a question of how many cuts you gotta make and the little time to wait for it to stop moving adds up ( 10 or 100 or 1000 x 2 seconds = chance for screwup)
    i prefer not a cordless tool, even tho I heard some of them do stop instantly.

  5. #5
    I have all kinds of electric jigsaws I collected over the years. Never touch any of them now. I only use my cordless Makita.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,210
    My Festool shuts off nearly immediately. It also cuts accurately in very thick material with the proper blade and the guides properly adjusted. (barrel design, not d-handle)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    1,143
    Ditto what Jim said, my Festool Carvex is the best cutting/straight cutting jigsaw I've owned.

    Love it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,014
    Blog Entries
    1
    My bad, my Bosch is the 1591 barrel grip. When I release the trigger the blade does continue to move but it doesn’t even make it to the next cycle of up or down depending on the direction it’s going so, nowhere near a second. Maybe there is a perception thing about how long a second is . . . LOL.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    1,677
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hahr View Post
    That is some kind of impatience. I donít think that would be a feature on any jig saw. My Bosch probably stops in about a second. I do have to think about letting it stop before I pull it straight up out of the cut.

    Dan
    Dan,
    I see it as an effort to optimize steps in production. If you have to do 1000 cuts a day, a half second saves you something like 8 minutes.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    834
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Feeley View Post
    Dan,
    I see it as an effort to optimize steps in production. If you have to do 1000 cuts a day, a half second saves you something like 8 minutes.
    um OK.

    Sounds like a six sigma black belt looking to squeeze out a bit more. I’d counter with , maybe a jigsaw isn’t the correct tool for the job if you’re making 1000 cuts a day. Erez, sounds like a plasma or laser cutter or a small cnc would be better suited to the task. It would also allow you to do another revenue producing task at the same time.

    And 8 min. Is going to allow you to do what else or earn how much more in revenue ? You’ll could also raise your rates a 1/4% and make even more. Customers won’t notice.

    Take a deep breath, think like a surgeon and not an automobile assembly line worker.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Central MA
    Posts
    1,394
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    My bad, my Bosch is the 1591 barrel grip. When I release the trigger the blade does continue to move but it doesn’t even make it to the next cycle of up or down depending on the direction it’s going so, nowhere near a second. Maybe there is a perception thing about how long a second is . . . LOL.
    So just for kicks i went out to the shop and pulled out my 1591. It is well broken in but still pretty factory fresh. Using a stopwatch I ran it at full speed and shut it off 10 times and came up with an average coast down time right at 2 seconds. My best guess on stroke count in that 2 seconds is +/- 20 strokes.

    The 1591 doesn't have a trigger, it has a on/off slide switch with a separate speed dial on the rear of the saw.
    Last edited by John Lanciani; 01-13-2021 at 6:46 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,589
    I think if it stopped that fast things would break or the blade would get thrown out. Stripped gears come to mind. on metal lathes, and most machines, no faster then 3 seconds deceleration is recommended. If the load is heavy and spinning fast even longer and you will have to add a braking resister to absorb the energy. If not the back EMF can fry the controls.
    This is one reason threaded chucks are no longer used. Stop them too fast and they can unthead and go flying with hundreds of pounds of workpiece still firmly held in the jaws.
    Bil lD
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 01-13-2021 at 8:21 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,014
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by John Lanciani View Post
    So just for kicks i went out to the shop and pulled out my 1591. It is well broken in but still pretty factory fresh. Using a stopwatch I ran it at full speed and shut it off 10 times and came up with an average coast down time right at 2 seconds. My best guess on stroke count in that 2 seconds is +/- 20 strokes.

    The 1591 doesn't have a trigger, it has a on/off slide switch with a separate speed dial on the rear of the saw.
    Wow, that is quite a difference. I wonder if I have the speed dialed low from whatever I was doing last? Sorry about the trigger/switch terminology confusion;-)
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  14. #14
    Perfect sense what you guys say. The 8 minutes saved in a day is not really the issue. Its not $$ time that I am trying to save here. It is time that is used in deep concnetration when making a cut that has to stay within tight bounds and not ruin an expensive guitar neck. Those few seconds I have to stand holding the tool while it is cycling down is precious concentration time, and it is something that anyone who does precision work with repition knows you want to be efficient as possible.

    I think there are tools out there with a need for a quick stop either for safety, convenience, or more accuracy. My hammer 4400 bandsaw has an electric brake system that stops the blade within a second which otherwise would keep turning for a long time... The table saw brake system is a good safety feature, which I would buy if it wasn't so expensive. But with these little tools it should be a pretty simple matter to add this feature for convenience and accuracy (I have made screwups because of this that it is somethng I am willing to pay extra $$ for)

    if you are curious, here is the cut i am making, the slots on the headstock: 69c042d32776dd92c4081ab610ad23c4-1396289414-large2-1030x618.jpg

  15. #15
    AFter some more research, I ended up ordering a cordless Makita (DJV180) which seems to stop fast as soon as you let go of the trigger (at least that's how it looks in videos on Youtube). I've been using a really cheap machine for years, and I'm sure this will be an upgrade... Thanks for all the input.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •