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Thread: What are you guys waxing your plane soles with?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    What are you guys waxing your plane soles with?

    I use paste wax, rub on, wait, buff off. It works but it's slow. I've recently seen some people just scribble a couple squiggly lines with some sort of more solid little chunk of wax, but i don't know what it is. What works for you guys?

  2. #2
    Gulf Wax. You find it in the canning section of the grocery store. One box will last a lifetime.

  3. #3
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    Gulf wax. I cut one end off the carton and continue to cut the carton back as I use it.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  4. #4
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    Awesome thank you. Bonus points because I love when i can walk into a "regular" store and buy something useful for woodworking!

  5. #5
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    I just use tea lights, pull the wicks out and they're good to go.

  6. #6
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    I got a bag of old candles from my mom. It should last forever.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Johnson View Post
    I got a bag of old candles from my mom. It should last forever.

    Ain't it the truth.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  8. #8
    I mix 2/3 beeswax to 1/3 boiled linseed oil in a old muffin pan. Melt in the oven at a low temperature. Once all the wax is melted pull it out of the oven an let it cool to room temperature. It hardened to a little bit harder than a normal candle an will last years.

  9. #9
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    I bought a little beeswax candle at the farmer’s market.

  10. #10
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    FWIW, I find paraffin from tea candles (same as gulf wax) works considerably better than beeswax, which has a bit of tack. Even though I prefer the idea of using beeswax... I go through about one candle once every very long time.
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  11. #11
    Oiled rag in a can, candle, Gulf wax, it all works and kinda depends on what is handy. Not worth obsessing over.

    ken

  12. #12
    Join Date
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    I use both a "rag in a can" or a chunk of paraffin, cut off a block of paraffin. Trying to decide which I like better.

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    I have a rag in a can, a chunk of beeswax lying around and some chunks of gulf wax. Whatever is convenient.

    Packrats prefer beeswax.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  14. #14
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    Soles will get a few squiggly lines from an old , plain candle less than a dollar at Wal E World.

    To "oil" the rest of the plane....old, plain, cheap paint brush that has a "filling" of 3in1 oil.....just rub the brush around as need be.....brush is around a dollar bill, got it while getting that candle.

    I also use that candle on the threads of screws....helps prevent them from snapping off in the Ash, or Oak....Candle started out as a white 6".....now down to ~4"....

  15. #15
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    It depends on what is at hand.

    There are a couple hunks of candle wax in the shop. A couple hunks of bee's wax in a drawer.

    There is also a rag impregnated with furniture oil/wax used to rub down planes, tools, turnings and even furniture.

    There is also a piece of cloth with the old cloudy version of Johnson & Johnson's paste wax that is occasionally used.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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