Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Note to self, buy gloves to use when handling raw lumber.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    448

    Note to self, buy gloves to use when handling raw lumber.

    Impaled myself yesterday morning. This was the diameter of a toothpick and 3/8" long. Buried in my left index finger. Doctor is using the tweezers to make the hole bigger and digging around trying to find it. I said, "Doc I think it is closer to the skin", and then he found it.

    Brian

    Splinter.jpgsplinter 1.jpg
    Brian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,660
    Well that hurt, didn't it?

    My son is a machinist/welder/metal worker and somehow ended up with a similar shaped piece of metal in his arm just below his elbow, but it was in deeper and the hole through the skin was very tiny. When he was sitting in the ER and the doc was looking at it he asked my son why he thought he needed to come to the ER for it. My son pulled out a small rare earth magnet from his pocket and waved it over the splinter hole, raising a large bump in the skin. Both the doc and the nurse were quite surprised at how large the bump was. They became instant believers, and went immediately to work opening up the hole to remove the metal splinter. They used the magnet again to make certain that they had gotten it all out. A pain killer, and an antibiotic shot later and we were headed back to my son's house.

    It's a shame that in cases like this, that wood splinters are not magnetic. In fact, they aren't even easy to see in an X-ray. Yes, gloves are needed when handling lumber and are a good idea, but not when close to moving machinery where they can get caught and drag your hand into the machine. I'm also glad that the doc got it out for you and you didn't loose much of that precious red stuff. I have gloves in many locations in my shop and also my truck with the right kinds nearest the work that I use them for. Many kinds, and placed near wear that glove design is needed. You need to get in the habit of wearing gloves and changing them to the proper ones as your work changes, but it's also not always a good idea to wear gloves for some kinds of work. We have to train ourselves to make the choices as the work we are doing changes.

    I wear gloves often when working, but still usually manage to leave a little DNA on almost everything that I build. Fortunately, it's usually just a scratch and the blood stains can be hidden under the finish or sanded off.

    Charley
    Last edited by Charles Lent; 01-10-2021 at 12:47 PM.

  3. #3
    Yep, there are always a couple pair of gloves on the center seat of the pickup, more behind the seat, more in the shop, and still more in the garage. You never want to be caught without them available.

    I've never understood how I can be so needle-phobic in the doctors office, yet in the shop I can pull one of those out with my teeth without a second thought and keep on working.
    Last edited by Andrew Seemann; 01-10-2021 at 12:51 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    448
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Lent View Post
    Well that hurt, didn't it?

    My son is a machinist/welder/metal worker and somehow ended up with a similar shaped piece of metal in his arm just below his elbow, but it was in deeper and the hole through the skin was very tiny. When he was sitting in the ER and the doc was looking at it he asked my son why he thought he needed to come to the ER for it. My son pulled out a small rare earth magnet from his pocket and waved it over the splinter hole, raising a large bump in the skin. Both the doc and the nurse were quite surprised at how large the bump was. They became instant believers, and went immediately to work opening up the hole to remove the metal splinter. They used the magnet again to make certain that they had gotten it all out. A pain killer, and an antibiotic shot later and we were headed back to my son's house.

    It's a shame that in cases like this, that wood splinters are not magnetic. In fact, they aren't even easy to see in an X-ray. Yes, gloves are needed when handling lumber and are a good idea, but not when close to moving machinery where they can get caught and drag your hand into the machine. I'm also glad that the doc got it out for you and you didn't loose much of that precious red stuff. I have gloves in many locations in my shop and also my truck with the right kinds nearest the work that I use them for. Many kinds, and placed near wear that glove design is needed. You need to get in the habit of wearing gloves and changing them to the proper ones as your work changes, but it's also not always a good idea to wear gloves for some kinds of work. We have to train ourselves to make the choices as the work we are doing changes.

    I wear gloves often when working, but still usually manage to leave a little DNA on almost everything that I build. Fortunately, it's usually just a scratch and the blood stains can be hidden under the finish or sanded off.

    Charley
    Yep, I've seen this as a salesman calling on maintenance guys. Did he save the metal piece? Brian
    Brian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    448
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Seemann View Post
    Yep, there are always a couple pair of gloves on the center seat of the pickup, more behind the seat, more in the shop, and still more in the garage. You never want to be caught without them available.

    I've never understood how I can be so needle-phobic in the doctors office, yet in the shop I can pull one of those out with my teeth without a second thought and keep on working.
    In the truck is a great suggestion thanks Brian
    Brian

  6. #6
    Some time back, Bill Carey, on one of the favorite tool threads suggested the Grammercy Sliver Kit. On that recommendation I purchases the kit and it has proven to be excellent. I keep a razor blade in the kit to expose things a bit better, but I think it a really good value.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Lent View Post
    It's a shame that in cases like this, that wood splinters are not magnetic. In fact, they aren't even easy to see in an X-ray. Yes, gloves are needed when handling lumber and are a good idea, but not when close to moving machinery where they can get caught and drag your hand into the machine. Charley
    I work with Stainless steel, so it like wood is NON-magnetic (At least the kind I use, lower grades and stainless for high temp is magnetic). Gloves are a must when working with things that will bitch up your hands, sharp edges, rough surfaces, friction. I also advocate using leather gloves, not the stretchy cloth kind for pulling weeds as they do nothing to protect your hands except maybe from dirt.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    10,462
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    Some time back, Bill Carey, on one of the favorite tool threads suggested the Grammercy Sliver Kit. On that recommendation I purchases the kit and it has proven to be excellent. I keep a razor blade in the kit to expose things a bit better, but I think it a really good value.
    Have several spinter extractors but sometimes the spinter is too deep. I generally use a #11 blade in a scalpel to cut down to expose and extract deep splinters. (Scalpels are readily available on Amazon) A low-power stereo microscope helps for those in the hands. I've tried to get my wife to do it buy she just looks like she's gonna faint and leaves the room.

    But yes, gloves.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    27,542
    Just before I retired in 2011, my employer issued "cut resistant" gloves for everybody, several pairs. I was using a pair a couple years later while unloading some lumber and ran a red oak splinter through the glove into my hand. It hurt like crazy trying to get the glove off so I could remove the splinter! Cut resistant? Maybe. Splinter proof? No! I now have a pair of leather gloves in the shop I use for unloading lumber.
    Ken

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,120
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    10,462
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    Just before I retired in 2011, my employer issued "cut resistant" gloves for everybody, several pairs. I was using a pair a couple years later while unloading some lumber and ran a red oak splinter through the glove into my hand. It hurt like crazy trying to get the glove off so I could remove the splinter! Cut resistant? Maybe. Splinter proof? No! I now have a pair of leather gloves in the shop I use for unloading lumber.
    It could be worse.

    I used to volunteer to assist our large animal vet when on calls in our area. My job was primarily to hold the baby and fetch things.

    Once we went to a friend's farm to look at his horse, being treated for an eye irritation. Looking with a strong light she said "I need some tweezers". We found tweezers on the truck and she pulled a 1-1/4" splinter out of the horse's eye.

    JKJ

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    It could be worse.

    I used to volunteer to assist our large animal vet when on calls in our area. My job was primarily to hold the baby and fetch things.

    Once we went to a friend's farm to look at his horse, being treated for an eye irritation. Looking with a strong light she said "I need some tweezers". We found tweezers on the truck and she pulled a 1-1/4" splinter out of the horse's eye.

    JKJ
    Ouch! I can only imagine how bad that hurt.
    "The key to a long life is when you start to die, don't"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,660
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Runau View Post
    Yep, I've seen this as a salesman calling on maintenance guys. Did he save the metal piece? Brian
    Yes. He has it in a bottle on his desk.

    Charley

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,660
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    Just before I retired in 2011, my employer issued "cut resistant" gloves for everybody, several pairs. I was using a pair a couple years later while unloading some lumber and ran a red oak splinter through the glove into my hand. It hurt like crazy trying to get the glove off so I could remove the splinter! Cut resistant? Maybe. Splinter proof? No! I now have a pair of leather gloves in the shop I use for unloading lumber.
    "Cut Resistant" is not Cut Proof or Puncture Proof. It's just harder to cut the glove on sharp edges.

    Charley

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Posts
    273
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Seemann View Post
    I've never understood how I can be so needle-phobic in the doctors office, yet in the shop I can pull one of those out with my teeth without a second thought and keep on working.
    Ditto here.............horrible childhood Dentist and Dr experience growing up. But a sliver...........I have no problem poking, digging, cutting, etc. to get it out.
    If over thinking was an Olympic event, I'd win Gold every time!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •