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Thread: Shipwrights Plane ID?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    108

    Shipwrights Plane ID?

    Hi all, I recently picked this plane after spotting it in one of New Englands many antique (mostly junk) stores. It is made what I think is Lignum Vitae as it is heavy and is most certainly not a native wood. It was sold to me as a shipwrights plane as were a some others that I bought and were there. They were all in one booth that doesn't usually sell tools and were in good condition leading me to believe that they were well cared for. I also know that Lignum Vitae was a commonly used wood on ships so I would make sense that this could have belonged to a shipwright. The readable portion of the punched makers mark on the plane (also the only mark on the plane) reads as "...........K Tool Co. Warranted Cast Steel" I have attached some pictures below. All thoughts wanted!
    Thanks!
    Aiden
    IMG_2285.jpgIMG_2284.jpgIMG_2286.jpgIMG_2283.jpgIMG_2282.jpgIMG_2287.jpgIMG_2288.jpgIMG_2289.jpg
    "The key to a long life is when you start to die, don't"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    108
    Here are some more pictures.
    Thanks again!
    Aiden
    IMG_2290.jpgIMG_2291.jpgIMG_2292.jpgIMG_2293.jpgIMG_2294.jpg
    "The key to a long life is when you start to die, don't"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Holliston ,Ma
    Posts
    9
    About the only thought I would have concerning this plane is that it is a razee type. That being a lowered rear section. Numerous planes like this were used in the ship/boat building industry and the type is generically called s shipwright plane.
    The aft section was removed to reduce some weight(helps with overhead work) and also get the push hand lower to the work surface. The styling was used on all sizes of planes with the jointer being well adapted to the razee style. If you have ever used an ECE jointer with the handle on top of the plane, there is some awkwardness to the planing operation. Using a jointer that is a razee type is much more comfortable in my opinion.
    Having built my own planes for work, I adopt the razee style as it suits me well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    108
    Thanks for the info! I do love working with this plane. It is one of the smoothest planes I have ever used!
    "The key to a long life is when you start to die, don't"

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