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Thread: Glue for pre-finished plywood

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3,178
    Having taken apart pocket hole plywood, I can say that the glue added a surprising amount of strength (raw wood, not finished). So glue clearly adds strength to the joint so I always use it (because I can). I have only used pre-finished plywood a few times and I used glue when I would have raw edges touching (like in a dado).

    I do not hold a lot of hope that my regular glue will hold to the finish. If I really needed the strength, I would at a minimum scuff the surface and I would probably perform a few tests. To convince myself that I was happy with the strength. I would trust E6000 to hold, but that really is not suitable for this application I don't think.

    Jim Becker mentioned using a jig to sand right along the edge. I suppose that you could do similar with a router table and do more than scuff the finish.

  2. #17
    Roo glue clear.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    The sheet goods I get as a hobbyist are not the quality that a shop that buys it by the truckload gets.
    I’ve been fortunate with a company called “DSI” (Distributor Services International). They sell in bulk to pro shops, but they’ll sell single sheets. Their business model is a little funky...you call their headquarters, set up the purchase, then drive to a warehouse to pick up the order. They’ll take checks or cash, but they add 3% if you want to use a credit card.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,233
    Quote Originally Posted by David Kenagy View Post
    I’ve been fortunate with a company called “DSI” (Distributor Services International). They sell in bulk to pro shops, but they’ll sell single sheets. Their business model is a little funky...you call their headquarters, set up the purchase, then drive to a warehouse to pick up the order. They’ll take checks or cash, but they add 3% if you want to use a credit card.
    My sheet goods supplier recently instituted a 3% surcharge for CC purchases. I can appreciate why, but it's a bit harder for small operations that don't have "fully stocked" bank accounts to cover a check since those generally get deposited electronically and immediately. But I figure the cost for that into a project so it really doesn't matter in the end. Many suppliers will cheerfully sell to small operators and hobbyists. Mine even delivers with only a fuel surcharge for a $300 minimum order...which is darn easy to hit. LOL If I need just a little more material to make that minimum I add on something for shop utility or "oops" close out material which is darn inexpensive compared to pristine, but is usually 90% usable material.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    837
    Before I'd use gorilla glue I would use hot melt polyurthane or even construction adhesive. GG is jsut too time consuming and MESSY for carcass construction.

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