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Thread: Right Tilt TS: any tips or jigs for 45% ripping??

  1. #1
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    Right Tilt TS: any tips or jigs for 45% ripping??

    I have in Incra fence on my right tilt Unisaw. Can't really move it to the left. I have a couple projects that would be a lot simpler and more efficient if I could just rip some 8/4 hardwood boards at a 45% angle, then glue them up. I'm about to try making a few 3D end grain cutting boards, if anyone is wondering.... They need to be dimensionally equal. They will be at least 24" long. Longer if possible.

    I really do not like ripping boards on this saw, and I usually find some other way to get around it. But I was playing around with the idea of building some type of jig, or sled to make this a safer, and more precise operation. I'm still waiting for an epiphany....

    If anyone has some sage advice, I'd love to hear it.

  2. #2
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    What about something like a tapering jig or a straight rip jig that rides in the left miter slot? You can use a couple stops to set the position of the pieces and hold down clamps to keep them tight to the jig.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myles Moran View Post
    What about something like a tapering jig or a straight rip jig that rides in the left miter slot? You can use a couple stops to set the position of the pieces and hold down clamps to keep them tight to the jig.
    Like this Rockler jig. https://www.rockler.com/taper-straig...8f1478cf87e633

    I used this on my r-tilt saw for tapered legs, but you could make a simpler one for straight rips.

  4. #4
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    One idea I've been pondering, is to use an old TS sled I have. I could modify it as needed.....It has a 3/4 base though, and that might be too much. Or I could just build a new one, and dedicate it to angle rips.

  5. #5
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    I'm wondering why you couldn't move the Incra fence to the left side of the blade? The carriage lifts off (after loosening 4 bolts), and if you set the stop bolts before doing that it easily can be returned to where it was. If you have your rails set to the right leaving not enough rail on the left side--those can be loosened and moved as well. I keep my rails shifted to the right, partly to keep from walking into them and partly to add a little more rip on the right side (left tilt saw), but on occasion have shifted them back to the left as needed. Incra's videos can for sure explain that a lot better than i can--but the system is pretty flexible.
    earl

  6. #6
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    It wouldn't get me enough cutting capacity to help much, if I could even move it easily...... I can't, as I have too much crap attached to the rails that I don't want to deal with.

  7. #7
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    If your cutting a complete slice corner to corner itís a tougher situation. If you are cutting a smaller amount you can use an L shape fence board that lets the off cut float without getting jammed and shooting out.

  8. #8
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    I donít have the Incra fence so there may be an obvious reason this wouldnít work, but could you make a second fence that locks down to the incra fence rails, then use the incra fence to position the secondary fence? Once the secondary fence is locked down, retract the incra fence to make the cut.

  9. #9
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    Still have the problem with the stock only being partially under control.
    I’m not sure I’ve ever cut a large 45 degree on my right tilt. Using two push sticks seems necessary and scary.

  10. #10
    What's the problem - blade tips right, fence is on right, keep workpiece against fence and rip, offcut falls away to left. If saw and fence are in aligment and stock is milled straight and flat cut should be like any rip. Perhaps some feather boards and a push stick. I assume your splitter tilts right with the blade.

    In my earlier days all saws were right tilt - supposed to tilt away from your hands when using the miter gauge.

    And as a right hander I like my fence left of the blade so I can stand left of cut, push with my right hand and never reach across the blade - try it with machine off.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Gornall View Post
    What's the problem - blade tips right, fence is on right, keep workpiece against fence and rip, offcut falls away to left. If saw and fence are in aligment and stock is milled straight and flat cut should be like any rip. Perhaps some feather boards and a push stick. I assume your splitter tilts right with the blade.

    In my earlier days all saws were right tilt - supposed to tilt away from your hands when using the miter gauge.

    And as a right hander I like my fence left of the blade so I can stand left of cut, push with my right hand and never reach across the blade - try it with machine off.
    It seems like that should work as long as the fence is dead parallel with the blade. Some set their fence a few thousands out at the back to prevent pinching. Moving the fence to the other side of the blade would cause pinching.

  12. #12
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    How bout this:
    https://www.infinitytools.com/magswi...CABEgLOxPD_BwE

    -or - this :
    https://www.amazon.com/CARTER-MAGFEN...76745673&psc=1


    put it to the left of your blade and have at it. Sure, it’ll take a bit of time and scrap to get it dialed in and parallel to the blade. Shouldn’t take any longer than the procedure did on your Incra though.

  13. #13
    Make a new fence on the left side of the blade. Carefully align and clamp a straight edge (like a 4ft level) to the table. This would be a pain if you had to adjust it multiple times, but for a bunch of repeated rips at the same width, no big deal.

    This has the added benefit of letting you make the infeed longer to allow better registration. I've seen it theorized that you can make the fence stop near the back of the blade to reduce the risk of kickback.

  14. #14
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    I need to take another look at my riving knife. It's an aftermarket knife that I installed many years ago. The saw did not have one when I bought it (used). Not sure if it tilts or not. I rarely rip boards with the blade tilted. That would be a problem if it doesn't.

    The boards I need to rip are going to be roughly 24" X 32". 1.5" thick. I'm wishing I had a sliding table. That type of saw would make this pretty simple. The T/S sled idea is sounding like the best solution for now.

    Dave - thanks for the links. I've been eyeballing one of those mag fences for a while.

  15. #15
    There are so many "tricks" to using a tablesaw but they're being lost to time. In Fine Woodworking 10 or 20 years ago they showed a method of raising the blade at 45 degrees into sacrificial fence at the workpiece thickness and running the cut.

    I was stuck once with no fence on a saw. Cut strips to run in miter slot and glued them to the work piece to guide the cut. Knocked them off after.

    Fence in a friends shop didn't have enough capacity - he called asking ahat to do. I told him to clamp a board under the workpiece and run it against the outside edge of the saw table. Fence on workpiece instead of on saw. He called back said it worked fine.

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