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Thread: Sioux close quarter drill plastic fan

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Sioux close quarter drill plastic fan

    My trusty Sioux 8030 close quarter drill suffered a failure of its cooling fan, cracked clean in half. I haven't been able to find a replacement part so far.

    Does anyone know of a source? Failing that, it looks like a part that could be 3D printed, or use the old one to make a mould and then cast one. Anyone ever tried that or know someone who could do it? (I don't have ready access to a 3D printer) With casting I imagine any shrinkage or swelling of the resin used will result in it not fitting the splined shaft.

    IMG_2666.jpg IMG_2663.jpg

  2. #2
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    My son regularly 3D prints items for my shop and I understand the basics of the capabilities. I'd say that's the direction you need to go.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Check with Milwaukee for parts.
    Bil lD

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Check with Milwaukee for parts.
    Bil lD

    My thought also. If you need a model number, tomorrow I can look at one of mine. I have three

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Peoria, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    My trusty Sioux 8030 close quarter drill suffered a failure of its cooling fan, cracked clean in half. I haven't been able to find a replacement part so far.

    Does anyone know of a source? Failing that, it looks like a part that could be 3D printed, or use the old one to make a mould and then cast one. Anyone ever tried that or know someone who could do it? (I don't have ready access to a 3D printer) With casting I imagine any shrinkage or swelling of the resin used will result in it not fitting the splined shaft.

    IMG_2666.jpg IMG_2663.jpg
    Very few plastic parts are cast. They are usually injection molded.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Very few plastic parts are cast. They are usually injection molded.
    That part in-fact appears to be injected molded, the small circular marks around the hub look like ejector pin marks...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    My thought also. If you need a model number, tomorrow I can look at one of mine. I have three
    That fan was only sold with the complete replacement armature for the Milwaukee 0375 which is no longer available so I'd probably go the 3D printer route if you can create a 3D model of the part. Seems like lots of scanning options for smartphone apps these days.

    Could also look on Fleabay for the aforementioned Milwaukee equivalent. I've seen decent used ones go for $50-$60.

  8. #8
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    I assumed the original part was injection molded, the technology I have available however would be to make a silicone rubber mold from the original part and then use a casting resin to recreate the part, that is what I was referring to.

    I've tried looking for the Milwaukee equivalent part and the sites I've found show almost all the parts for that model as "discontinued", and don't list the fan as a separate part anyway.

    I've ordered one of Ken Rizza's (Woodturners Wonders) drills as a replacement, it's present-making season and I need a working sander sooner rather than later.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Little Rock, AR
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    26
    Ken even has replacement brushes for his drills. Great guy to do business with.

    Pat

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