Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Shoulder plane size?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
    Posts
    293

    Shoulder plane size?

    I was going ask my wife for a woodriver shoulder plane for Christmas, but having not used one, I am curious to which size people find most useful.

    I cut a lot of 3/4" joints such a rabbets, grooves, and dados. Thinking this may be useful to help square up joints?

    Also, I am kind of dead set on the woodriver. I know you aren't supposed to buy a tool on looks but i really like the victorian styling of it. Plus the woodriver is in our price range.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    I have a large and medium. I would use the large on that size tenon.

    Probably best as your first shoulder plane, as the extra weight makes it a little easier to use.

    That said, I use a router plane very often especially on short tenons.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    20,899
    You'll get plenty of comment on this. Here's mine:
    - If you can only have one, the medium is most versatile, the large is my preferred.
    - For only $40 more you can have the Veritas which is the hands down winner in form and function IMHO. The Woodriver has the form factor that many find uncomfortable. The uncomfortable and ill-controlled grip result in a fast track ticket to the back of a drawer as opposed to becoming a favorite.
    - I have a 60% rule for tools; if the 'also ran' is 60% of the cost of the 'good one', I just save up a little longer and get the 'good one'. The 'good one' is, of course, subjective ;-)
    - A rabbet block plane is not a shoulder plane but, there are those who prefer them . . . I am not one of them.
    - Once you become a shoulder plane user it will factor in to your thinking and be used on so much more than shoulders.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,489
    I like the HNT Gordon single blade 3/4" shoulder plane.

    It's *much* more comfortable than the Veritas plane was.
    Not cheap, but good value for money.

    https://hntgordon.com.au/products/3-...ane?view=quick

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    289
    Yep, as Glenn stated, youíll get a lot of comments. No opinion on Woodriver, never used any of their products and likely never will. Iíve got LN large and small shoulder planes and their use depends on the task. For small joints or delicate work, the small shoulder plane shines - very easy to control, very precise. For anything medium to large in size (such as the joints you describe), the large is the way to go - lots of heft and itís size makes it easy to grip. For me the medium is a compromise between the two; able to do either large or small work but excelling at neither. But I donít have one so others may disagree.

  6. #6
    Depends on how you will be using the plane. For shoulders (there is a reason its called a shoulder plane) I find the small size most useful. The LN small sized shoulder plane is not much more expensive than the WR medium, and you end up with a Lie Nielsen vs. a chinese made plane. If on the other hand you will be using the tool for tenon cheeks and other tasks, the larger size may be more useful: I don't use the tool for these tasks so I will let others comment on these applications.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
    Posts
    293
    Well, this is going to make me sound stupid, but i had no clue woodriver was made in China. If i am going to spend the money, i would rather buy a Lie-nielsen or Veritas then. My wife would prefer one made in north america too

  8. #8
    From a Popular Woodworking article in 2011 - ďWoodcraft offers four sizes of bench planes: #3, 4, 5, and 6. All under the brand name "Wood River". On top of the cast iron body these planes include parts made from steel, wood, stainless steel and brass.

    CIXI city Qiangsheng tool co. in Zhejiang Province makes them for Woodcraft.Ē

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    N. Idaho
    Posts
    1,104
    I have the LV medium and it is a lovely plane. I also have the large router plane and would recommend that first if you don’t already have a router plane.
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,619
    I have the LV medium and really like how it works in my hand.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
    Posts
    4,587
    Just my opinion but I prefer my LN router plane for shoulders...Have 2 shoulder planes but seldom use.
    Jerry

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Burlington, Washington
    Posts
    58
    Another vote for the medium LV shoulder plane.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    9,399
    Afraid mine was made way before LV or LN were even in business....
    Blanket Chest Project, tenon too fat.JPG
    Stanley/Wards No. 78...in use...
    Blanket Chest, Day 16, router work.JPG
    Stanley No. 71-1/2....1905 version....comes in handy..
    Blanket Chest, Day 10, name that tool.JPG
    Middle of this photo...is the Auburn 1.25 skewed rebate plane, No.181....once set, also does a fine job as a shoulder plane....
    Blanket Chest,Day 6, rebate fine tuning.JPG

    But..I have been known to just use a nice, sharp chisel.....when one is handy...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    443
    I started out with the Med Veritas, used that exclusively for several years (note, lots of time between projects, so this statement isn't terribly profound). Last year I got the Large as the medium was feeling a bit smallish for some jobs. Honestly, now that I have the large, I'm not sure my assessment was correct, but I do like the heft. I don't have much time on task with it (large) yet. I also recently got the small, which I've not yet used. (I guess I just had to have the whole set. )

    All are the Veritas. I definitely prefer USA/Canada built products when I can.

    I'd definitely go with the Med or Large unless you are maybe doing lots of projects with thin stock (small boxes?). Then you can buy the other one when you feel it is too big/too small for a given task.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,785
    Quote Originally Posted by Erich Weidner View Post
    I started out with the Med Veritas, used that exclusively for several years (note, lots of time between projects, so this statement isn't terribly profound). Last year I got the Large as the medium was feeling a bit smallish for some jobs. Honestly, now that I have the large, I'm not sure my assessment was correct, but I do like the heft. I don't have much time on task with it (large) yet. I also recently got the small, which I've not yet used. (I guess I just had to have the whole set. )

    All are the Veritas. I definitely prefer USA/Canada built products when I can.

    I'd definitely go with the Med or Large unless you are maybe doing lots of projects with thin stock (small boxes?). Then you can buy the other one when you feel it is too big/too small for a given task.
    Hi Erich

    I have all three sizes of the Veritas shoulder plane. I have a couple of others as well One worth mentioning is the Stanley #93, which is 1” wide and quite a low body compared with shoulder planes in general.

    My go-to shoulder plane is the Small Veritas. At 1/2”, it is perfect for most rebates and trimming shoulders (although I mostly use a chisel in this task). The Large is often like swatting a fly with a tank. I purchased this in Ottawa at the Veritas factory in 2013, and have only used it about a dozen times since. The Large can be used if you choose to trim tenon cheeks with a shoulder plane ... but this is where the lower centre of effort of the Stanley #93 is preferred.

    If you only ever own one shoulder plane, get the Medium. It is a very fine all rounder.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •