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Thread: Wall strong enough for lumber rack?

  1. #1
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    Wall strong enough for lumber rack?

    Thinking about cleaning out my large shed and installing cantilever style brackets on the rear 2x3 wall for lumber storage. Iím worried that the wall isnít strong enough. Itís a salt box style shed, the rear wall is roughly 5í high. I wouldnít overload it with lumber, as the majority of my stock is in flitches covered outside. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    DEFF43DE-9BA4-4B32-ADE1-E5C5E2238897.jpgHereís a picture of said wall. Best I could get as the rest of the wall is obscured with junk.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
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    May 2018
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    How long is that wall?
    don't see any collar ties or other wall to roof bracing
    both ends, how are they braced?
    if a solid end wall then that end of the side wall is braced.
    Is there a door on the other end? how long of a end wall is there for a brace?
    ron

  4. #4
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    Feb 2010
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    Mt Pleasant SC
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    There is not enough going on there to try it. It needs vertical legs.
    On regular construction everything acts as a system, exterior wall sheathing, roof sheathing and ceiling joists. Then still you can’t cantilever much weight on new construction without strapping several studs to the ceiling joists or you are relying on a few nails into end grain. The weight of the rack would be the safe limit before anything was put on it.

  5. #5
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    Is the mudsill bolted down correctly? Is there an exterior plywood shearwall nailed to meet modern code. If so as long as the two perpendicular walls are adequate to stop lean it should be fine.
    Bill D

  6. #6
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    Seattle
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    Great excuse to add a Mig welder to your Christmas list! Design/build as if a free standing rack-a vertical with cantilevered "foot" for vertical load and to manage tipping and lag to the top of the studs-cantilever gusset-ed shelf brackets. I used 1 1/2" x 1" channel spaced 4' apart and it's very stable. Hope the Mig fits down the chimney!!

  7. #7
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    Personally, I've switched all my lumber storage from stacked on racks to stood on end (so, from horizontal to vertical). I found that with horizontal racks it was difficult to get to the next piece of lumber that I wanted, and stuff would get buried/lost. Vertical storage on the other hand allows me to basically pull lumber like you would grab a library book off a shelf. I haven't experienced any bending/warping, and I didn't need to build strong shelves etc.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  8. #8
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    I donít know much about general construction, but it doesnít seem like this shed wall was built to withstand the force that a cantilever lumber rack would exert on it. Just as I assumed, but you guys have verified that for me. I currently have vertical lumber storage in that shed, but wanted to make room to get some slabs in there that are currently being stored outside, in turn making room for more slabs which Iíll be milling in the coming weeks. Iíll look into other options, thanks everyone for your input!

  9. #9
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    Slabs on racks would be a challenge for almost any building...they are generally best stored stacked and stickered, honestly. But for general lumber storage in a "weak" structure or where you want to increase the amount of lumber in a given area, a fully supported rack where you send material in from the end can be a good solution. That's what I've done for my lumber storage in the upstairs of my shop building. Yes, it's a little less convenient sometimes, but you can put boatloads of material in there as long as the floor can support it.

    Here's an old photo of my setup right after I built it.

    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
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    My slabs wouldnít be stored on shelves. They would remain stacked and stickered like you said, just inside rather than out. I meant I need to move my dimensional lumber from its current location to make room for slabs. I like your setup, Iím gonna see if that will work in my shed, although on a sightly smaller scale.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McGonigle View Post
    My slabs wouldn’t be stored on shelves. They would remain stacked and stickered like you said, just inside rather than out. I meant I need to move my dimensional lumber from its current location to make room for slabs. I like your setup, I’m gonna see if that will work in my shed, although on a sightly smaller scale.
    The general idea I show should work in your shed...you'll just need support "at the wall" for the weight. too, where I was able to tie to the roof rafters. You'll note that I have two vertical supports, however; one is in the middle, albeit a little harder to see in the photo. You can still tie that outer support to the building wall, but it's not for strength. Rather, it's simply to keep the rack in place.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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