Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 48

Thread: Oneway 1640 or Robust Sweet 16

  1. #1

    Oneway 1640 or Robust Sweet 16

    Thinking about a new lathe. Its between a Oneway 1640 or a Robust Sweet 16. The reviews rave about the Robust lathes more so than the Oneway, but the Oneway is cheaper and for what it's worth the Oneway is heavier

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,132
    I thought that was going to be a goodway lathe which would way outclass the wood lathe and outweigh it by x3 or 4.
    Bil lD

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I thought that was going to be a goodway lathe which would way outclass the wood lathe and outweigh it by x3 or 4.
    Bil lD
    Well, that may be a goodway to go by x3 or 4, but noway. It's just too weighout

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,778
    Iíve used my friends One way I thinks itís 2436. Great machine the Robusto looks great too and itís American made .
    I would be happy with either one.
    Good Luck
    Aj

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    88
    Mark, I think you're getting to the zone of 'so good, it's hard to compare'.

    Robust makes great lathes - I own one. They're (the company) also incredibly easy to work with and made in the USA (if that matters to you). Maybe you're located in Canada in which case OneWay has the advantage there (Made in Canada - I think).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,689
    These are both very good tools and tool manufacturers. I owned a smaller OneWay years ago and it was built like a tank. The Robust tools I've seen up close have been equally impressive. For me, this decision would come down to comparing specific features based on what work you intend to do and if there is a price difference, the feature comparison will help tip things either way.

    And Ben is correct...OneWay is based in Canada. Robust is USA. Both are very worthy North American manufacturers and supporting either one with your purchase is a good thing.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    ...this decision would come down to comparing specific features based on what work you intend to do....
    That is what I was going to say! I have a Robust Sweet 16, but when I selected it, I wasn't comparing it to other 16-inch swing lathes, but to larger lathes, due to the Sweet 16's gap bed capability.

  8. #8
    Both are quality machines. I have very little experience with the Oneway lathes, and a lot with the Robust. Personally, I prefer the sliding headstock to the fixed headstock for bowl turning as the slide gives you a bowl lathe and a spindle lathe combined. Some rough in long bed formation, then finish turn on the outboard. The Robust is made in the USA. You can add weight to the Sweet 16.

    robo hippy

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Reed Gray View Post
    Both are quality machines. I have very little experience with the Oneway lathes, and a lot with the Robust. Personally, I prefer the sliding headstock to the fixed headstock for bowl turning as the slide gives you a bowl lathe and a spindle lathe combined. Some rough in long bed formation, then finish turn on the outboard. The Robust is made in the USA. You can add weight to the Sweet 16.

    robo hippy
    I am probably not as seasoned of a turner as others here. I figured I could turn any larger things outboard on the Oneway since the swing is increased there. My concerns about Robust are its higher price. Am I paying for gimmick whistles and bells that I really dont need? I understand I could add weight to the Robust, but my thought are, less weight translated into less steel and cast. I have read most all the online reviews and almost all rave about the Robust. There are a few that view it like a car you pay big bucks for just for all those fancy extras. I hope I dont get chastised for my thought here. I turn bowl shaped pieces. Mostly solid, but some hollow. I plan to do more hollow in the future.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,689
    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Thorpe Allen View Post
    That is what I was going to say! I have a Robust Sweet 16, but when I selected it, I wasn't comparing it to other 16-inch swing lathes, but to larger lathes, due to the Sweet 16's gap bed capability.
    Yes, a gap bed situation can make a lathe even more versatile. I have that in essence as a primary design feature on my Stubby 750 that I bought many years ago. (Robust didn't exist then)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    I've used the Oneway 2436 and Robust American Beauty and found the Oneway more enjoyable to use. Weight is always an advantage with a lathe so that would be another plus for the Oneway. However, in that size lathe my order of preference would be a Vicmarc, Oneway and then Robust. I'm surprised no one mentioned Vicmarc so far. If you're close to Las Vegas or plan to visit there stop by Woodworkers Emporium. They usually have Vicmarcs on display along with Robusts. The owner is a very accomplished and enthusiastic turner. I don't have any affiliation with them other than an occasional customer.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Tampa Bay area
    Posts
    405
    Not having a sliding headstock would be a deal killer for me.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hayward View Post
    Not having a sliding headstock would be a deal killer for me.

    I don't understand. How is sliding the headstock to the opposite end of the bed different than just turning from the opposite end of the headstock with an extension table? Seems like it would be less of a hassle besides introducing alignment issues.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    I don't understand. How is sliding the headstock to the opposite end of the bed different than just turning from the opposite end of the headstock with an extension table? Seems like it would be less of a hassle besides introducing alignment issues.
    I was wondering the same thing. This probably sounds like a dumb question, but if the tailstock slides and you can turn outboard, what difference does it make if the headstock is fixed?

  15. #15
    I understand both Oneway and Robust are very fine lathes and the reviews on both seem to verify it. It would seem to me you're paying the higher price on the Robust because of the seven year warranty. I considered selling my Nova lathe and buying the Robust Scout but it would be hard for me to give up the rotating head stock which neither the Robust or Oneway offer. The rotating head keeps these old bones from bending over and hollowing bowls and I'm not sure why Robust and Oneway don't offer this feature on their lathes?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •