Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Redwood with cherry quick question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    308

    Question Redwood with cherry quick question

    EF621141-691A-4709-A698-AB1059CB37E1.jpeg

    I’m making a small console like multi purpose cabinet with cherry. I was looking at veneer for the door panels and saw some redwood burl. How would redwood compliment cherry? How does redwood look as it ages? Don’t think I have ever seen a combination like that. The veneer sure looked nice and caught my attention.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Bryan Cramer; 11-21-2020 at 2:38 PM. Reason: Added picture
    My woodworking theory: Measure with a micrometer, Mark with chalk, Cut with an ax.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,383
    Redwood can look spectacular right off the saw. But it ages to a dull dark brown.

  3. #3
    I've worked with redwood quite a bit. My house is sided with clear all heart redwood as is much of my interior. All my interior trim is in redwood and several accent walls are paneled with clear all heart vertical grain material. I also have worked with cherry in furniture making. The redwood is quite soft. But using redwood burl for inset door panels should work nicely and it is beautiful. Color-wise, I think the combination of the burl panels and the durable cherry frames would work quite nicely. Experiment with finishing first, but I would highly recommend using a solvent based finish. Both woods would amber and age nicely with a solvent based finish. I am a big fan of water based finishes and use them extensively in my shop. But on cherry and redwood, a water based finish would prevent ambering and would probably give the cherry and redwood a "washed out" look. All my redwood interior woodwork is almost 30 years old and has been finished with a wipe on oil finish. It has darkened to a deep red color, but none of it has turned brown or become dull. For your cabinetry, I would suggest spraying conventional lacquer if at all possible, which should promote aging and yet allow the grain to "pop" without leaving the wood dull over time.
    Last edited by Rob Sack; 11-21-2020 at 2:57 PM. Reason: additional material

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    308
    Well thanks guys! I ordered the veneer so I guess I will find out.
    My woodworking theory: Measure with a micrometer, Mark with chalk, Cut with an ax.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,005
    I've seen a lot of old redwood that is really dull. Better heed Rob's advice. Since you've already ordered the veneer, I won't share my advice about choosing it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •