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Thread: Lacquer question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Granby, Connecticut - on the Mass border
    Posts
    319

    Lacquer question

    Folks -

    I'm wondering if a lacquer that is labeled as being "a high quality nitrocellulose lacquer" could be pre or post cat lacquer, or would those be labeled differently? I ask because I'm trying to figure out if I can use it, as it is past a hand-written expiration date on the label. It came from a friend's workplace. It seems to dry and cure fine. As best I can tell from reading up on lacquer, plain nitrocellulose lacquer is pretty much good forever, but a pre-cat lacquer if too old might seem to dry fine but will have problems down the road with adhesion, cracking, etc.

    The product is an industrial, not a consumer, product, so it's label only lists a cryptic code-type thing: 58E-1-2-200000-GL TT-L-58E Type 1 Class 2 CLR LAC. It is listed as "Randolph Products, Mil-spec Coatings: It seems to be this, I think:https://chemsol.com/products/lacquer...-interior-use/

    Anyhow, does the designation of being nitrocellulose lacquer (assuming that web page is actually the product I have) mean it is NOT a pre cat lacquer? I hate to waste the stuff if it's usable.

    Thanks -

    Ken in North Granby, CT

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,638
    Catalyzed products would normally be labeled as such, including shelf life after catalyst is added. Plain old Nitro is pretty simple stuff. The product you link to appears to just be plain old Nitro.

    Keep in mind that these products require specific safety considerations when applying for both environment and PPE.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Granby, Connecticut - on the Mass border
    Posts
    319
    Thanks Jim. I decided to try the stuff on a noncritical project - the pine ceiling of the entry area in our garage. Very hard to use with the solvent odor - even in the garage, with the door open. Looks ok, though, but I wouldn't want to use it again until I can do it completely outside, on the lawn. With a stiff breeze.

    Ken

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,638
    The fumes from the lacquer are, in fact, quite dangerous, so applying outdoors if you don't have a proper spray booth is pretty much what's required.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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