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Thread: Oneida Super Dust Gorilla - Not starting

  1. #1
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    Oneida Super Dust Gorilla - Not starting

    I purchased the 2.5 hp Onedia Super Dust Gorilla Cyclone in 2008 and have used it minimally since then in my hobby shop. When I attempted to run it today it did not start, no noise from the magnetic switch or the motor. I am suspecting the switch may have died but don’t know how to check or repair short of replacing it. When I opened it, everything looked fine visually.

    Any ideas on how to troubleshoot?

    Several pictures of the switch are below for reference.
    73C40A42-32A3-4B0E-9B10-FDB6AA022F70.jpg1E899B51-DFF2-4070-82E7-E8E9F8303DDC.jpg33E01152-4AB1-4797-B776-F75F434311E5.jpg
    Last edited by Frank Martin; 11-16-2020 at 9:10 AM.

  2. #2
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    Step 1 Uaing a voltmeter, check that you do indeed have power to the switch
    Step 2 I would manually engage the contactor. Using an insulated/non conductive probe, press in the contactor (dark red squares) and see if the motor comes on.
    Step 3 replace switch

    Because you do not hear the contactor close it is likely the switch is bad. If the motor starts when you manually press the contactor then the switching is bad
    If the Motor does not start when manually pressed then the overload circuit is tripped and since I don't see a manual reset I am assuming it is an autoreset once it cools down type.
    At this point there isn't a lot you can replace except the switch

    Chuck

  3. #3
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    I would add check the output terminals for voltage. Does the motor have a thermal overload? Is it just the one switch, no slave stations?
    Bill D

  4. #4
    Check for voltage at L1 and L3. I'm not a fan of forcing contactors closed. Do you have a a skematic? I'm not sure where the control voltage comes from.

    Stan

  5. #5
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    Attached is the schematic for the switch. I have voltage at L1 and L3. When I force the contactors I get voltage all the way through to the cable to the motor. However, at no time the motor started even when I measured voltage to the motor. The motor is a Baldor. Does this mean the problem is the motor or could it still be the switch?

    If it is the switch, is there any harm if I use a regular switch rather than a magnetic switch? I searched and could not find the same switch available online. Called Oneida and left a voicemail but have not heard back. So, in the event it is the switch, I would like to know if I can get something off the shelf, instead of a magnetic switch.
    CD3AAA53-2B7B-4CC8-93F4-F3A2040F2330.jpg

  6. #6
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    interesting. If you're getting voltage to the motor and no motor action then it is time to look at the start capacitor. But when you push the start button the contactor does not close? You may have the evil two problems at the same time. As far as changing switches, yes you can use a switch other than a magnetic starter though you lose overload protection. And you need to use a switch rated for motor control, not just a "light switch". The other nice thing about magnetic contactors is if power is lost, they don't powerup when power is restored.
    Chuck

  7. #7
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    When you say you are getting voltage at L1 and L3 and at the motor...are you measuring between L1 and L3 and between U and V at the motor? And seeing 240 volts or close? Or are you measuring from those terminals to ground or neutral?

    Have you turned the circuit breaker completely off and then back on?
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  8. #8
    I suspect the heaters triped the control circuit. Disconnect T1 and T3. Make sure the heaters are reset. Then check to see that you have control voltage between L1 & 95, and
    L1 & 17. What is the primary voltage and what is the control voltage?

  9. #9
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    The motor is bad. I am not sure if that switch will lock on if the load is not drawing any current.
    I would run the overload adjust lock to lock and reset it to where it was. Maybe jump around the stop switch with a clip lead.
    Before I replace that switch I would disconnect the motor jumper in a 240 volt load and see if that makes the switch work. It could be as simple as two 120 volt light bulbs in series connected to T1 and T2.

  10. #10
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    Even if the start circuit is bad you should hear a hum from the run windings when power is applied. feel the case for a vibration or use a iron feeler guage. I still suspect an internal thermal overload inside the motor

  11. #11
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    I bypassed the switch entirely and direct wired the motor. No response. Checked the capacitors, they look fine and when I measured the capacitance they both had readings in the correct range. Does this mean it is time to pull the motor and take it to a motor repair shop or are there any other checks / fixes I can try?

    Below are additional pictures of the motor:
    7570253A-A466-45C9-92FD-63C1897645F0.jpg2B368BA0-8674-4D1C-86DA-4E8E411DAB9F.jpgF4E5199A-7192-401F-8B7A-58F3FF26429D.jpg7B702AF4-C60A-4606-B1B4-FCBD0BB0BA7D.jpg

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Even if the start circuit is bad you should hear a hum from the run windings when power is applied. feel the case for a vibration or use a iron feeler guage. I still suspect an internal thermal overload inside the motor
    Any ideas on how to access this on the motor I have? I did not see a switch in the wiring box or where the capacitors are located. Do I need to disassemble the motor further to see this thermal overload switch?

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Martin View Post
    Any ideas on how to access this on the motor I have? I did not see a switch in the wiring box or where the capacitors are located. Do I need to disassemble the motor further to see this thermal overload switch?
    Does the motor nameplate call out "thermally protected "?
    The thermostat is an option. It's a thermal switch to work with a relay. I doubt your motor has a thermostat. Could you post a picture of the motor nameplate? I think it's odd the motor shorted open. Are you measuring voltage at the motor with your jumpers in?

  14. #14
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    I have nothing to add on diagnosing the issue, but man, that sucks. Baldor motors are typically bullet-proof.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Coryell View Post
    Does the motor nameplate call out "thermally protected "?
    The thermostat is an option. It's a thermal switch to work with a relay. I doubt your motor has a thermostat. Could you post a picture of the motor nameplate? I think it's odd the motor shorted open. Are you measuring voltage at the motor with your jumpers in?
    Picture of the motor nameplate is attached to post #11. I don’t see anything about thermal protection on it. I measured voltage at the motor with one probe at a live connection, another to ground. What do you mean about “jumpers in”?

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