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Thread: Craftsman (Parks) Planer Model 112.23490

  1. #1
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    Craftsman (Parks) Planer Model 112.23490

    Planer is in very good unrestored condition and I am trying to decide if it's worth installing a shelix head in it.
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  2. #2
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    How much does the head cost ? Do you already own the planer ? To me that planer does not look like it even needs "restoring". I would look at the situation this way ,if that planer will do everything that you will ever need and you plan to keep it forever put the shelix head in and be done. If you have questions about how long you will own it ,don't. YMMV.

  3. #3
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    Do you mill a high percentage of highly figured wood and hard abrasive exotic species? I get the feeling a lot of shelix heads are sold because it's trendy. That machine has gone it's whole life without a shelix, and I am getting really close to 50 years of woodworking without a shelix head, so it would be an easy choice for me not to put that kind of money in a machine with almost zero parts support except for scrapped out machine parts on eBay. If it's because you don't like to change blades, I consider that a required skill to being a woodworker. I can't even count the number of blades I've changed, even done it for others. It simply requires the same patience that all woodworking takes. I guess if I ran a one man professional shop I would consider it for time savings and knife life. But then again I would have a much different machine if I intended to make a living on it.
    Last edited by Richard Coers; 11-14-2020 at 9:35 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Hampe View Post
    Planer is in very good unrestored condition and I am trying to decide if it's worth installing a shelix head in it.

    Definitely a well cared for machine
    I am still running straight knives on my planers and jointers. I will switch over to segmented knives when/if I get a new planer or jointer due to noise issue. My shop is in the basement and only thing my wife complains about is the noise generated when I settle in and plane some wood (50 bdft or more) as i prefer to do this until the dust collector is full and then maybe fill it again in one session.
    You have to decide if noise, cost, keeping up with the trendy ones, balances out against the cost and labor of changing over. I don't see the need on what I have. However I don't have a nice planer like yours. Yours looks like where I would end up not where I am at now.
    Ron

  5. #5
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    I recently put a Shelix head on a Powermatic 100 planer (12"). It cost me $896 delivered, with the bearings pressed on.

    I like how well it works. I don't mill a lot of exotic woods, but nevertheless I think the lowered chipping-out is great on domestics. I'm milling a bunch of soft maple right now, and with straight knives I was getting a lot of chip out around knots.

    I was in touch with Hermance but it would have taken three months to get a head from them - they are that busy.
    Last edited by Mark Gibney; 11-14-2020 at 11:14 AM. Reason: added size of head for clarification

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Do you mill a high percentage of highly figured wood and hard abrasive exotic species? I get the feeling a lot of shelix heads are sold because it's trendy.
    I think Richard is on to something. What is the drive toward a segmented head? I was wasting a lot of figured material. Having to start from scratch because the jointer took a large tearout on the piece I had already selected happened more than it should. The nature of what I work on and how I work it made a good case for segment heads for me. They also pay for themselves rather quickly if you are a regular user. That math is pretty much common knowledge by now but you can find articles about that in several periodicals.

    That machine appears to have been well cared for. I would be tempted to get the knives sharpened and see how it does unless the compelling reason for an insert head is already known. If knives work for you, buy a second set and do not be sluggish in swapping to a sharp set and sending the dull ones out when required. The cost of an aftermarket head can buy a lot of things; this is coming from a user and a fan. If the need for an insert head is absolute, the folks at Holbren and other suppliers can help you with a fit.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 11-14-2020 at 11:15 AM.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
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  7. #7
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    Check the bearings on the bedrollers mine were worn out and sloppy. Easy fix if you have the tools. As is that is a huge step up from a lunch box planer with an insert head. It has a real chipbreaker etc. There is a fine woodworking article online of how to tune a planer that uses that exact model as the demonstrater. Not designed for dust collection but easier to adapt then a four post type planer.
    Bill D.
    PS: I had mine for years until I realize d the bolt on the infeed cover is not a knob. It is a critical adjustment.

  8. #8
    I would try some high grade straight knives. REAL M2, or T1. Most planers come new with the cheapest knives.
    Good knives greatly reduce tear-out.

  9. #9
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    I dramatically reduced the tear out on my 24" Yates American when I had it in my business. I got the advice to back grind the front of the planer blades to reduce the cutting angle. Much like the new trend to use negative rake scrapers in woodturning. I had my grinding shop put a 10 degree bevel on the front of the straight blade, about 1/8" wide.

  10. #10
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    I agree and beyond any needed maintenance I don't plan on "restoring" it.

  11. #11
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    Other than running one board thru it before I bought it in March, I have not reassembled it. There was a crack in the base and I took the motor out to reinforce it and inspect the rest of the base.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I would try some high grade straight knives. REAL M2, or T1. Most planers come new with the cheapest knives.
    Good knives greatly reduce tear-out.
    Thanks I will look into those.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Check the bearings on the bedrollers mine were worn out and sloppy. Easy fix if you have the tools. As is that is a huge step up from a lunch box planer with an insert head. It has a real chipbreaker etc. There is a fine woodworking article online of how to tune a planer that uses that exact model as the demonstrater. Not designed for dust collection but easier to adapt then a four post type planer.
    Bill D.
    PS: I had mine for years until I realize d the bolt on the infeed cover is not a knob. It is a critical adjustment.
    My workhorse is an Oliver 399. I also have a Belsaw that I bought new from Sears 40 years ago and the Dewalt that I will likely sell and a W&H model W7 that I'm debating whether or not I want to keep.
    Last edited by Ron Hampe; 11-14-2020 at 12:39 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    I dramatically reduced the tear out on my 24" Yates American when I had it in my business. I got the advice to back grind the front of the planer blades to reduce the cutting angle. Much like the new trend to use negative rake scrapers in woodturning. I had my grinding shop put a 10 degree bevel on the front of the straight blade, about 1/8" wide.
    Thanks, I'll give that a try the next time these need sharpened.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Check the bearings on the bedrollers mine were worn out and sloppy. Easy fix if you have the tools. As is that is a huge step up from a lunch box planer with an insert head. It has a real chipbreaker etc. There is a fine woodworking article online of how to tune a planer that uses that exact model as the demonstrater. Not designed for dust collection but easier to adapt then a four post type planer.
    Bill D.
    PS: I had mine for years until I realize d the bolt on the infeed cover is not a knob. It is a critical adjustment.
    I'll check those when I go over it. My friend installed a black plastic dust collection port on it that fits nicely, but I have no idea where he got it. I'll post a picture of it when we get home later today.

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