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Thread: A good source of containers for the workshop

  1. #1
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    Mar 2010
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    A good source of containers for the workshop

    I retired about 4 years ago and I now do all of the household cleaning. When I was cleaning my daughters bathroom I found a number of empty cosmetic and toiletry containers in her waste bin which I have repurposed for the workshop

    Such is my enthusiasm to use containers that I view as both useful and tactile ,today my wife put a empty night cream container which she had washed by the front door for me to use in the workshop
    Last edited by Brian Deakin; 11-06-2020 at 2:20 PM.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Deakin View Post
    I retired about 4 years ago and I now do all of the household cleaning. When I was cleaning my daughters bathroom I found a number of empty cosmetic and toiletry containers in her waste bin which I have repurposed for the workshop

    Such is my enthusiasm to use containers that I view as both useful and tactile ,today my wife put a empty night cream container which she had washed by the front door for me to use in the workshop
    Please delete this post before my wife sees it and expects me to follow your lead.
    Repurposing containers is great idea, I use the plastic mixed nut jars from Costco for storing paint thinner used to clean brushes and other things.

  3. #3
    I have two words for you:

    Talenti
    Chobani

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Mt Pleasant SC
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    I use a plastic tray to hold a hundred small items on my side extension so I can pick it up to make room for a large plywood rip.

  5. #5
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    It is amazing how many Altoid tins hold various items in my shop. Many of them have been painted on the tops so it is easy to label them with a sharpie.

    Also the little cans from diced green peppers 4 oz. and 7 oz. sizes for holding small parts. One thought is to make a slanting vertical rack for them for holding screws and such.

    There are still some plastic vitamin packages with hinged tops from about 40 years ago holding various screws and plumbing items in drawers.

    There are also a few things stored in old 35 film cans (both single roll and bulk film), tobacco tins, metal coffee cans and bicycle tire repair containers.

    There are likely a few that have been forgotten like an old military surplus ammo can.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
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    I used to look in the dumpster behind a local pizza shop. They got piazza sauce in #10 cans. 3-5 every time I looked. I did have to wash them. I can not remember the chain brand that was on every can. When I worked in a cannery they shipped condensed tomato sauce in 50 gallon drums and 5,000 gallon bags. One or two bags was full load for a flatbed truck depending on size of the trailer.
    Bill D

  7. #7
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    My father had a few bomb fuse cans in the wooden dynamite boxes under the lathe full of metal bits that could be useful someday. The better stuff, like brass, wa sin coffee cans on a shelf.
    Bill D

  8. #8
    back in the '70s when we engraving computer buttons our customers would bring the blanks in ~4x7x2" thin-gauge cardboard boxes with full-cover lids, which made for another box- There's probably over 100 of them still holding stuff in this place, along with a big box under a worktable to stash all the spares. They don't tip over, don't slide, don't have sharp edges, they're shallow enough you don't have to dump 'em out to get to what's in the bottom, and with the lids on you can stack 'em 10 high...
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
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    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    Please delete this post before my wife sees it and expects me to follow your lead.

    Below is a known fact that applies to all married men

    I can prove that I am perfect because my wife chose me and she would not have chosen a man that was not perfect
    After 29 years of marriage she has now decided I am no longer perfect but there is a simple explanation
    During the last 29 years she as continued this process of molding me into her ideal man but has now decided she does not like what she has created
    Last edited by Brian Deakin; 11-06-2020 at 5:24 PM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  10. #10
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    We buy soup at Costco...generally in "two packs". I wash them out and they head to the shop for various finishing uses while still remaining recyclable. There have been a number of other consumer product boxes/containers that have been repurposed over time to my shop. It's just a good way to do things, IMHO.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. There are a ton of snack factories around here and clear plastic one gallon and gallon and a half containers of snacks are discounted everywhere. Just Monday, I bought a 2 gallon plastic drum of fried pork rinds for $1.50. I use them for dog treats.. When the container is empty it is washed, the label removed and goes to the workshop. They are clear, the lids make them dust proof and I can see the contents easily. One container has all the wood burning "stuff", another has the balls of twine, string, and other cord, another has those little odd hardware pieces I picked up over the years, the springs, little brass hinges, snap hooks etc. Easy to just roll the drum around and look for the thing I want. All my wood carving stuff is in one. As I make small things for kids, I put them in one of the drums. Until I have enough for each grandchild, or neighbor kid. It may not be as efficient as flat containers but I can see the contents without moving the drum.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Deakin View Post
    ...today my wife put a empty night cream container which she had washed by the front door for me to use in the workshop
    Brian, she's just trying to lure you out of the house so she can change the locks!

  13. #13
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    I too use old yogurt containers for mixing epoxy and dyes, and holding glue during a glue up. The ones that have small handles are good for touch up paint (foam brush fits in the handle).

  14. #14
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    And don't forget the esteemed cigar box.

    20171222_122705.jpg
    You know, the worst ain't so bad when it finally happens.
    Not half as bad as you figure it'll be before it's happened.
    - Bob Curtin

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I have two words for you:

    Talenti
    Chobani
    Get thee behind me, you shameless husky.

    I just managed to work off 5 of my Covid "nineteen" extra pounds...

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