Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 31

Thread: Powermatic 2820 EVS drill press

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    794
    I got rid of my 2800 and replaced with a Nova. Very Happy, have another on order. A lot of the electronic features are pretty gimmicky. It's basically a VFD and a three phase motor. I think the gimmicky features come from a development team member saying "All done but I've still got 8K of memory available, what else can we have it do?" It's a solid drill press. Hope Powermatic followed their lead because the 2800 was a steaming pile and an insult to the 1150 and 1200 models.
    Chuck

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    20,913
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Jensen View Post
    There is a thread on the Felder Owners Group and several members have the Powermatic 2800 and are unhappy with the vibration and runout. I would make sure you buy a 2820 off the floor so you know you are getting a good one. The Nova seems to have favorable but I have not ever touched one.
    The 2800's have been a black eye for PM. Different makers have different strengths and the 2800B certainly addressed a lot of the problems with the 2800. PM still was unable to address the quality inconsistencies and the low speed issues at the time I stopped looking at them. The low end was never really low enough for large cutters but, the fact that I was not able to find one that actually even went as low as rated was disheartening. Not trying to beat a dead horse but, I guess I just lost faith in PM as a DP maker.

    As recommended, if you go this way be sure to try and buy the floor model that you actually put your hands on. Watch for table adjustment issues, vibration and run out as these seem to go from "no problem" all the way to "I'm returning it". I truly hope the 2820 is PM's redemption for their past attempts. A great company that just hasn't been so good at drill presses IMHO. At $2K the thing should be near perfect. Drill presses just aren't that complicated that a decent one should command such prices . . . . OK, now I'm just whining. Maybe I woke up on the wrong side of the drill press .
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,560
    Actually I'd argue that a good drill press is more complicated than you would think. The thrust load while maintaining low runout at speed takes some engineering and decent bearings. Good boring machines used high precision angular contact bearings with a high preload. None of that comes cheap. While wood working isn't nearly as demanding, the issues with most drill presses comes from cheapening the spindle and bearing design. I'd want to see an exploded view of the assembly before I decided on a purchase. Distance between the bearings, their size, and precision, diameter of quill, etc. Dave

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Arlington, TX
    Posts
    391
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Saunders View Post
    I got rid of my 2800 and replaced with a Nova. Very Happy, have another on order. A lot of the electronic features are pretty gimmicky. It's basically a VFD and a three phase motor. I think the gimmicky features come from a development team member saying "All done but I've still got 8K of memory available, what else can we have it do?" It's a solid drill press. Hope Powermatic followed their lead because the 2800 was a steaming pile and an insult to the 1150 and 1200 models.
    Chuck
    Actually the Nova DVR products are powered by Variable Reluctance (aka Switched Reluctance) motors, which are somewhat like a stepper motor, but with fewer poles. They can provide more torque at low RPM than similar-power 3 phase AC motors, though the type of VFD control scheme can make a considerable difference, especially when paired with an inverter duty motor (generally better insulation and cooling).

    The Nova Galaxi and Voyager power and/or torque can be increased by simply replacing the power cord plug and plugging them into 240VAC.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    794
    Cool, thanks for the detailed info Andy. Learn something new everyday.
    Chuck

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Va.
    Posts
    113
    Hi David here is a document that is the manual with an exploded view of the parts of the drill ....if you have time could you take a look and let me know your opinion? thanks
    https://content.powermatic.com/asset...820_man_EN.pdf

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Arlington, TX
    Posts
    391
    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan Lane View Post
    Hi David here is a document that is the manual with an exploded view of the parts of the drill ....if you have time could you take a look and let me know your opinion? thanks
    https://content.powermatic.com/asset...820_man_EN.pdf
    While it is impossible to tell how well something is manufactured from such an exploded diagram, it is possible to see some trade-offs made in its design.

    The lack of reverse capability leads to simpler drive electronics and a simple (apparently brushed) DC motor. Reverse on a drill press is not often useful, unless incorporated into semi-automatic thread tapping, which I have not tried on my Voyager.

    The PM speed range is 150 to 3600 RPM in two overlapping speed ranges, compared to 50-5000 RPM in 1 continuous range for the Voyager.

    The PM has a 1 HP DC motor, compared to the 1-3/4 HP DVR motor on the Voyager. If the power cord is replaced, and the Voyager is plugged into 240VAC, the Voyager has 2 HP.

    Offsetting the limited speed range (at useable torque) of the PM's DC motor/control is a 2-speed mechanical gear transmission, with two additional shafts, each with gears, bearings and seals, housed in a machined casting.

    The PM has an automatic shut-off if the transmission speed lever is moved (or is not in either detent) during operation, but no solenoid to lock the lever in place while operating.

    The PM's spindle socket taper is MT-2, the same as the Voyager.

    The PM swing, at 20", is 2" more than the 18" swing of the Voyager (The PM has 1" more clearance from spindle center to column).

    The PM table design is innovative, allowing additional, replaceable table inserts to provide extra features, while preserving the factory fence mount.

    The PM also includes LED lights and laser cross-hair projectors, which the Voyager lacks.

    Both the PM and the Voyager require electronics and SW to function. Nova chose to put more into electronics and SW, and reduced their manufacturing complexity/costs, while providing more features (some arguably not that useful) at less cost.

    In the end, it probably depends on the user's comfort level with electronics and SW vs mechanical systems, and price. But like I said above, both of these machines require their SW and electronics to function.

    I already have a Voyager, and do not see anything on this PM model that would change my purchase decision were I to do it over again. The chances that a project needs more than 9" clearance to the column of the Voyager, but less than the 10" of the PM, is pretty remote, but not zero. It is more likely that a project beyond the capacity of the Voyager would need a radial drill press anyway.

    If you completely discount the value of the additional SW-provided features of the Voyager, and its wider, continuous speed range, the choice boils down to whether the PM's 2" of additional swing, table features, and light/lasers are worth the $300 price premium over the Voyager.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    3,454
    Blog Entries
    6
    I bought the Rikon variable speed drill press and love it. It has a 1.5hp motor and I have to caution friends that come to the shop not to hand hold stuff because it will break your thumbs if it binds. The variable speed really makes it easy to switch to a large Forster bit without having to move belts around. I must report one issue, however: the digital readout is now stuck on zero, and it appears to be the sensor. I have not tried to fix it yet. It may be the sensor just came loose and moved out of range.

    I think I paid around $1000 for the Rikon. It is not gear driven, but it works well, and the metalworker who shares a shop with me really has been impressed with it as well.

  9. I checked out the 2820EVS. Workmanship quality is below my standards for a $2000 machine. Table only tilts left and right. (My delta also tilts forward). Table doesn't have an indexing pin to assure returning to 90 degrees so you need to adjust it square every time you move the table. (My 1970 Craftsman has an indexing pin at 90 and 45). I had the store rep power up the drill press and it is noisy and vibrates. I am very disappointed with Powermatic.
    I have looked at the Nova also, but not impressed.
    I will stick with my 10 year old Delta with reeves drive. Works just fine.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Phoenix AZ Area
    Posts
    2,418
    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan Lane View Post
    Joe...the 2820 appears to be an all together different animal from the 2800 which is belt driven ...kinda of a Nova knock off so to speak
    Yes, but given the feedback on the 2800 and the fact that the 2820 is new, I would definitely want to buy one off the floor where I could verify things like runout before the sale.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Winterville, NC (eastern NC)
    Posts
    2,139
    Very happy with my Nova Voyager. You have to read the instruction manual to get the most use out of it. I like that the machine will allow you to select the correct speed for the bit and material you are working with.
    Almost like alien technology.

  12. #27
    The more one uses the Voyager, the more intuitive it becomes. I my case only a handful of features are used, but they make all the difference: instant variable sped and the ability to dial in a range of drill bits into different materials; the depth gauge and the automatic reverse (when switched on); I get 2 hp from the motor, and with huge torque. Run out is non-existant. The 18" swing is greater than anything else on the market except the 20" of the PM - frankly, I cannot imagine having more than 18", not when the average is around 6"! The extra 2" of the PM is a non-event.

    Criticisms: It should have come with a laser X. I added the Wixey, which solved that issue.



    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  13. #28
    I plan on getting the Powermatic 2820EVS. The Powermatic is about 50 pounds heavier than the Nova, the table is a little larger and it's a 20" vs. the Nova 18" which is a major issue for me. Before I pop for it I'm waiting for the Powermastic southwest rep to assure me that if this units has problems like the PM2800, I can just ship it back and not go thru the warranty dance where they send parts to fix a problem. If the rep puts that in writing , I'll go ahead with the purchase. I do believe this is Powermatic's redemption for the disatrauous PM2800 drill press. If it does come together, I'll follow up with a review on the machine.

    Mark
    www.marklevin.com

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Va.
    Posts
    113
    Look forward to your review Mark i am still on the fence about this drill press and the Nova is on back order again!!!

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,544
    Just looking at the website i have a couple of concerns.

    Lots of special pieces, motor, and gears, that can only be repaired by installing Powermatic replacements. With a little luck it will run a lifetime without problems.

    As with most DPs the table could go lower if the base were designed differently. I sometime want more capability and end up swinging the table out of the way and blocking up from the base.

    With a VFD the power available is dependent on rpm. This machine may dissapoint at low rpm in either gear. 3 or 4 gears would be better though more complex.
    Last edited by Tom Bender; 12-11-2020 at 9:26 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •