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Thread: Fast curing glazing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    West Boylston Massachusetts
    Posts
    578

    Fast curing glazing

    I have a high fixed window that needs reglazing . I would like to get to it this year. Good sun on that side of the barn.
    any suggestions. I am in central Massachusetts and it is almost November.
    Thanks in advance, Kevin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    2,349
    Call a glass shop? Just what is your question?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,174
    Aqua Glaze if it has to be in a hurry. It needs to be painted within a few days. If left unpainted for any long period of time, it will crack.

    Don't use DAP in a can. My favorite is the DAP in caulking tubes, but it needs to be put on heavy, and left to dry for several months, to a year or more, before you trim it down to size, and paint it. It shrinks a lot.

    I avoid any with linseed oil in them. I've tried them all, over several decades, with various tests lasting years.

    https://www.amazon.com/Savogran-0210...961d8c4e311a60

  4. #4
    The stuff sold in the caulk-type tubes is said to be fast cure....that's all I got

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    1,016
    Is it just a single pane or is it insulating glass? If in a barn I would guess it's not insulated and is just held in with steel points and glazing putty. If so then the speed at which the putty dries isn't going to matter. DAP does make a caulk but it's latex based so it needs to dry before rain hits it. That's hit or miss this time of year in New England. The putty you apply by hand isn't latex based so rain and snow shouldn't bother it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    530
    Wood sash?
    Wood dries out and needs linseed oil or other treatment otherwise it sucks the new putty dry and it cracks. Has been over 20 years since I last glazed a window and things have changed since then.
    Good luck
    Ron

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    396
    We have old glazed windows in our chicken coop and some other outbuildings, I picked up most of the windows on the roadside over the years on free piles. When the glazing dries up and falls out I use 100% silicone in a caulk tube, I figure it will last a long time and I don't care what it looks like up close, they're just to let light in and keep the weather out.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,174
    The wood needs to be painted with oil based primer where the glazing meets it. I've never seen one with bare wood there to last any time. I've lost track of how many I've done, but it's a lot. I've come up with a method that suits me, and lasts a Long time, as can be seen on the page on my website about it.
    http://historic-house-restoration.co...owglazing.html

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