Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Varathane water based finish

  1. #1

    Varathane water based finish

    Just did a test strip on my project, using the water base varathane. It seems to leave lines if not put on thick, and looks like it pools if too heavy.

    anyone else used it, Iím not confident right now with it.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    6,886
    What did you apply it with? Looks like you should use a softer brush.

    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    189
    I actually really like the Varathane WB poly. I thin it about 15% with General Finishes extender. Otherwise it’s too susceptible to brush strokes. The extender really helps it level out. You still have to work fast, don’t go back over mess ups. I use a foam brush with really good results. Almost all of the brush strokes and lap marks will tighten down as it dries. It took me a while to get the hang of the technique but now I finish almost all of the undersides of my pieces with it (after shellac to minimize grain raise).
    Last edited by Bennett Ostroff; 10-27-2020 at 12:07 AM.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    What did you apply it with? Looks like you should use a softer brush.

    John
    Quote Originally Posted by Bennett Ostroff View Post
    I actually really like the Varathane WB poly. I thin it about 15% with General Finishes extender. Otherwise itís too susceptible to brush strokes. The extender really helps it level out. You still have to work fast, donít go back over mess ups. I use a foam brush with really good results. Almost all of the brush strokes and lap marks will tighten down as it dries. It took me a while to get the hang of the technique but now I finish almost all of the undersides of my pieces with it (after shellac to minimize grain raise).
    I used a foam brush. I forgot to mention its the 3X type, Triple thick. I dont know if I have to put it on thick, so everything looks wet. Like I said, the consistancy is about that of a shampoo, liquid, yet doenst flow too well off the brush.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    6,886
    I've never been a fan of extra thick finishes. Bennett's on the right track by thinning it, but I wouldn't use 15% Extender. I'd try 5% water and 5% Extender and see how that goes and adjust as necessary. I'd also try a soft bristle brush, too.

    John

  6. #6
    Thanks all. I have decided to switch to a oil based version, I might go with the oil based version.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,726
    You will likely want to thin the oil based version, too. It's a nice finish, but I found it to be pretty heavy "out of the can" the one project I used it on. It ultimately worked out better thinned quite a bit and wiped on for that particular project. I had to level the first few brushed coats significantly.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Is there a finish thats usable right out of the can? I get that things might need to be done, but why not sell a product ready to go?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,726
    You can "use" any of them out of the can, but the crux of finishing is dialing things in for the conditions and the application method, especially for "fine woodworking" as compared to a lot of things that go on with home improvement. I suspect that many of the products sold in the mass market are thicker off the shelf because so many folks who don't finish things very often struggle a lot with runs when the proper viscosity for an application method is present because they try to put it on to fast and heavy. Lack of patience, as it were. So we woodworkers learn to make adjustments, hone our techniques, etc., accordingly.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    6,886
    Solvent based varnishes often are really thick to meet VOC limits. The exception is wiping varnishes like Arm-R-Seal. It has a very low viscosity and requires no thinning for most applications. Only on really large surfaces do I thin it so it doesn't set up too quickly and make streaks.

    John

  11. #11
    I have a habit of using Minwax quick dry polyurethane and Zissner SealCoat straight from the can, although they do tend to be a little friendlier with a dash of solvent added, especially if the can has been open for a while and product has thickened from the solvent flashing off.

  12. #12
    After testing and changing to a oil based poly, I have put the first coat on the table. I thin it a bit, and it went on really smooth, even for the first coat. Will hit it with some 320 before next coat.
    Thanks
    Jim

  13. #13
    So have been thinning the poly, so far I am happy with the results. IMG_0926.jpg

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •