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Thread: Best way to frame a 12 ft wall

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott T Smith View Post
    For either 10' or 12' ceiling height, I would install a base wall of either brick or concrete block around the perimeter of your slab, and then use 8' / 12' 2x6 on top of it.

    This has the benefits of termite protection, and the block at the bottom of the wall can be attached to the slab via rebar (drilled and epoxied into the slab), the block cavities filled with mortar with anchor bolts set for attaching the wood portion of the walls.

    Very strong and practical.
    I've thought about this as a way to raise up my shop which has 8' ceilings. You would lose the ability to put machines directly on the wall as a negative. As a positive you can get great slope away from the building if you put siding on to just below the block and use dirt to grade so you don't have to look at the CMU's.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel O'Neill View Post
    You would lose the ability to put machines directly on the wall as a negative.
    Why would you not be able to put machines directly on the wall?

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel O'Neill View Post
    You would lose the ability to put machines directly on the wall as a negative. .
    WHy? It's still a wall. It just has a different material at the bottom and maybe is an inch or two thicker at that point. It doesn't really impact machine placement at all in any meaningful way.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #34
    At least for the situation I was in. If I put the wall on CMU then I would have a 4" wall on an 8" block. So I could still push the machines close but I'd lose 4" all around the shop. Cost is the reason I didn't do it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Why would you not be able to put machines directly on the wall?

  5. #35
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    Twelve foot walls seems excessive. Ten foot wall studs (+top and bottom plates) should give you a nice space. Recess the lights to protect them. Run the ductwork in the trusses.

    Yeah, the hinge in the wall also means you have to lift the upper wall section into place.

    Jim suggests high windows. Explore this option.

    Congrats on the new shop.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Twelve foot walls seems excessive.
    That's a very subjective thing, Tom. It could even be objective, depending on the physical size of a building and other intended purposes.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #37
    I don't see any mention of steel studs so I'll be the oddball- you should use 20ga steel studs. Cheaper than wood right now and they're straight! I'm about to be using some for interior 12ft walls in my shop too.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grant Aldridge View Post
    I don't see any mention of steel studs so I'll be the oddball- you should use 20ga steel studs. Cheaper than wood right now and they're straight! I'm about to be using some for interior 12ft walls in my shop too.
    This would be a load-bearing situation...is the 20 gauge you mention suitable for that?
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #39
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    My understanding is that any contractor can build a two story normal building with no engineered plans. use structural steel and an engineer must sign off on the plans. No load bearing interior walls can use steel studs, no problem. But exterior walls or I beams must be engineered plans.
    Bill D

  10. #40
    If they're load bearing then by all means have an engineer look over and plan it out. You can get steel studs up to about 12ga. Even the 20ga like I'll be in sing is night & day different than the 25ga beer cans that the big box sells. Worth a look for sure. Did I mention they're straight? :-)

  11. #41
    I would go pole barn style and use the money savings to pay for spray foam insulation. You would be much happier that way especially if you intend to add air conditioning and or heat.

  12. #42
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    I wouldn't consider 2x4 at that height for such a space (20x40) as good enough for carrying the load of the roof. 2x4 is never considered load bearing. I'd go 2x6 (12'). The cost saving of going 24" vs 16" in the studs isn't worth it to me. Build it once and build it right.

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