Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 42

Thread: Best way to frame a 12 ft wall

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    397
    I would be nervous about a 24x40 building with 2x4 walls, that seems like a lot of roof to be held up by that amount of wood. I built a 20x30 building for the sawmill and tractor storage and used actual 2x6 rough cut and wouldn't have wanted to have much less. I also agree about full length studs being stronger, no doubt.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,181
    Buy about 20% more 2x6x12's than you're going to need, and leave them somewhere dry for as long as possible before you start the framing. Even picking the best ones you can find, some won't stay straight. You can use the shorter pieces you get out of the crooked ones for other framing parts.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Greater Manor Metroplex, TX
    Posts
    238
    When I built my shop, I did a mono slope roof with one wall at 12 ft. I used 12' 2 x 4s for that well.

    I definitely agree that if you decide to go 12 ft, do not do a pony wall on top of a standard 8 ft wall for any load bearing or sheer walls.

    If would recommend either the 2 x 6 or the LSL studs (if you can afford it)...the nice thing about the LSL is that they are straight and will stay straight.

    The only other thing I would mention is there is a big difference working at 10 ft vs 12 ft on a ladder. You would only think that it is 2 extra feet, but it has an imact.

  4. #19
    Thanks for all the input. I am going to use 2x6x 12 fir studs. The current shop/garage has 10ft walls. We have decided to go 12ft on this new shop looks like code will allow 24Ē spacing so thatís the plan. I am going to start framing tomorrow I think
    thanks
    gary

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Eastern Iowa
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Markham View Post
    Thanks for all the input. I am going to use 2x6x 12 fir studs. The current shop/garage has 10ft walls. We have decided to go 12ft on this new shop looks like code will allow 24Ē spacing so thatís the plan. I am going to start framing tomorrow I think
    thanks
    gary
    Obviously donít live in Iowa. Predicting snow on Sunday... Good luck.
    Comments made here are my own and, according to my children, do not reflect the opinions of any other person... anywhere, anytime.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    The old pueblo in el norte.
    Posts
    888
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Velasquez View Post
    Obviously donít live in Iowa. Predicting snow on Sunday... Good luck.
    They're predicting snow for a few miles from my house next week as well (ok, so above 6000') and the 90s the week following. It's weird weather.

    I don't mind framing in the cold at least.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    10,051
    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    I don't mind framing in the cold at least.
    Agreed! A lot more pleasant than the heat and sweat and bugs en el sur.

    JKJ

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,671
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Mason-Darnell View Post
    When I built my shop, I did a mono slope roof with one wall at 12 ft.
    I've been envisioning a shop design like this ever since seeing Frank Howarth's new shop on YouTube. It's a nice look and the mono-slope makes for some nice ventilation possibilities, too, for nice weather.

    ----

    OP, glad you decided to go with the 2x6.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    10,051
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Mason-Darnell View Post
    The only other thing I would mention is there is a big difference working at 10 ft vs 12 ft on a ladder. You would only think that it is 2 extra feet, but it has an imact.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I've been envisioning a shop design like this ever since seeing Frank Howarth's new shop on YouTube. It's a nice look and the mono-slope makes for some nice ventilation possibilities, too, for nice weather.
    That's how I build farm buildings. Gives extra height on one side, especially useful for birds flying up to a tall roost in the big peacock house (12x24, 12' high on one side). It sure simplifies the roof structure (for me) and roofing.

    If without one, go buy a 10' step ladder. I keep step ladders from 4' to 10'. I use the 10'er far more than I though I would. I almost bought a 12' but it was too expensive. (and needs a really big flat spot for stability, hard to find outside, perfect for a shop floor.)

    A friend of mine is a believer in scaffolding and keeps enough comfortably work on the 16' interior of his pottery studio. If building a shop by myself with high ceilings I might consider buying or renting some.

    JKJ

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,181
    Scaffold planks often come up on CL. The 12 x 24 single person one only weighs about 45 pounds, and comes up a lot for sale used. I have one that's 20"x32'. It weighs 176 lbs., but is like standing on a sidewalk. You can quickly, and easily frame up a structure to hold a plank off the side of the building. I try to never work off ladders.

    When I was a younger man, before I accumulated enough scaffolding to scaffold up a whole house, I would scaffold one side at the time, and completely finish (including painting and starting the roofing edge) that side before taking the scaffolding down, and moving it to another side.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    The old pueblo in el norte.
    Posts
    888
    Yea, used scaffolding is well worth picking up, assuming you can store it or.. buy it, use it.. sell it. Typically cheaper than a good ladder new as well.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    2,372
    We got rid of all our scaffolding several years ago. If a 12" step ladder isn't tall enough, we rent a scissor or boom lift. One worker can get way more done on a lift than 2 can with scaffold. And the cost of lift delivery, $110 each way, is way lower than the labor cost to load up scaffold from the shop & set it up on site. That works best for the way we work, but everyone's got different needs.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    281
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Markham View Post
    Thanks for all the input. I am going to use 2x6x 12 fir studs. The current shop/garage has 10ft walls. We have decided to go 12ft on this new shop looks like code will allow 24” spacing so that’s the plan. I am going to start framing tomorrow I think
    thanks
    gary
    I'd reconsider the spacing. 24" can cause grief down the road. Your sheeting and/or siding will look wavy. I run 16" for just about everything I do anymore, and sometimes go to 12". The boards are the cheap part of building a structure. It's all the other "stuff" that racks up the $per foot costs.

    When you go to stand the 12' wall walls, make sure you brace the bottom plate well. The bottom will want to 'kick out' on you more than an 8' wall, as you wank it up to a vertical position (unless you and your helpers all all 8' tall giants).

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,125
    Location. I do not think the western states will allow 2x4 walls more ten 10 feet tall. Nor hurricane states. Even with full shear nailing schedule. Thicker walls allow extra insulation if that is an issue in your climate.
    Bil lD

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,396
    For either 10' or 12' ceiling height, I would install a base wall of either brick or concrete block around the perimeter of your slab, and then use 8' / 12' 2x6 on top of it.

    This has the benefits of termite protection, and the block at the bottom of the wall can be attached to the slab via rebar (drilled and epoxied into the slab), the block cavities filled with mortar with anchor bolts set for attaching the wood portion of the walls.

    Very strong and practical.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •