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Thread: furniture shipping companys

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    black river falls wisconsin
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    823

    furniture shipping companys

    i made desk for customer and need to ship to South Carolina from wisconsin.. looking for leads on shipping company. plan to make plywood box to ship in.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    54,626
    UShop is often referenced as is using Fastenal stores to forward. Proper crating is not optional...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Sun Delivery does white glove furniture delivery. http://sundeliveryllc.com/

  4. #4
    If you're going to build a crate for it, then you can use any LTL freight carrier. I've crated furniture and machines, and shipped all across the country like that. We use Saia for our shipments as they have a good terminal near us. Old Dominion is another good one. Estes and many others too. If you're building a crate for it you don't need to bother with white glove or anything special. Just make sure a forklift/pallet jack can get under it and it's secured inside and they'll get it from point a to point b.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
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    1,989
    Hopefully you put white glove delivery in the bid. ANYTHING in a crate, going through a trucking terminal, presents a challenge to the forklift drivers to punch it at least once, maybe once on every side. LTL companies may load and unload that several times as they fill trucks to go to other regions. If you insist on using LTL, build an interior bumper from 2x12s around the perimeter on the bottom deck. At least that would take a fork punch when they don't drop the forks enough on a speed pass to pick it up. From Wi to SC, it might be unloaded 2-3 times.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
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    Put a pallet under anything you ship that is crated. I buy plastic pallets which any forklift can lift, that way they don’t start man-handling anything I’ve made. For crating/white glove I use Plycon. They are expensive....,and they are worth every penny of it.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    black river falls wisconsin
    Posts
    823
    well the desk has shipped. i ended up using ups freight. i killed alot of wood in making crate and when got on their truck took lot of pictures. the freight terminsl did not had forklift that could run outside so had to cordinate with them in transfering from my van onto the lift gate of the truck. the guy in charge was good to work with.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Hopefully you put white glove delivery in the bid. ANYTHING in a crate, going through a trucking terminal, presents a challenge to the forklift drivers to punch it at least once, maybe once on every side. LTL companies may load and unload that several times as they fill trucks to go to other regions. If you insist on using LTL, build an interior bumper from 2x12s around the perimeter on the bottom deck. At least that would take a fork punch when they don't drop the forks enough on a speed pass to pick it up. From Wi to SC, it might be unloaded 2-3 times.
    I ship crated machinery and furniture, and have a friend who ships crated and boxed high-end audio equipment via LTL quite often and this is very rarely ever a problem. I don't think between the hundreds of different shipments we've sent out, we've ever had a problem. I've heard of it, but it's rare. A reputable LTL carrier doesn't want a claim any more than you do, and those forklift drivers, while they might be under the occasional time crunches, are also usually very experienced at driving their forklifts. As long as you do your part, secure your item and allow them easy access under the pallet/crate for their forklift, chances are very high it'll make it to the destination just fine.

    There are some horror stories with freight, but a) they're not a common occurrence) and b) they usually are the result of the person doing an awful job securing/crating/palleting the item in the first place, before it even gets to the freight company.

    If you do your part making sure your item is reasonably secure with decent forklift access underneath, a good LTL freight carrier is very dependable.

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