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Thread: Steel Ducting for Shop DC

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Steel Ducting for Shop DC

    Hello,
    Re-modeling my shop, and just got my Oneida V-3000 DC and am thinking about the ducting. In the past I've used PVC, but wanted to upgrade to steel. The two options I've been investigating are the Oneida snap-lock system (22g), which looks reasonable but perhaps a pain to assemble, and the Nordfab system, also 22g, which looks much, much easier to install, but is also crazy expensive. The other ducting I can find locally is much more flimsy (e.g. 26g). So, what have other folks done? How difficult is it to work with the snap-lock? Anyone think staying with PVC still the best idea?? For reference, it's a home shop...about 500 sq ft. Thanks for the help!
    Izzy

  2. #2
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    26g spiral is not flimsy at all. If you go snap lock, you'd want 22g. I used all spiral 26g duct & long sweep elbows. The big box stores don't carry anything suitable for dust collection, it's all thin snap lock & tight elbows. I got my duct & fittings from a local HVAC manufacturer/supplier.

    Installation was easy. Just cut the duct with a jig saw & put 3 screws in each joint. Mastic duct sealer was used on every joint.

  3. #3
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    El Dorado Hills, CA, USA
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    You might also look at the "Nordfab-like" ducting from https://blastgateco.com. It's not identical, but close, and a fair bit cheaper.

  4. #4
    I have used this with my clervue max. I worked good for me.

    https://www.grainger.com/mobile/prod...nap-Lock-6EKF0

  5. #5
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    Show me any 26 gauge snap lock that has collapsed in a hobby shop. I suppose it is possible. 30 gauge, for sure. My whole shop is 26 gauge snap lock, main run is 7", no problems for nearly 10 years. If you go bigger than 7" and have a system that can draw 10" WC or better, you might want to go up (down) in gauge for the bigger ducts. https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....all&highlight=
    Last edited by Ole Anderson; 10-23-2020 at 11:23 AM.
    NOW you tell me...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    Show me any 26 gauge snap lock that has collapsed in a hobby shop. I suppose it is possible. 30 gauge, for sure. My whole shop is 26 gauge snap lock, main run is 7", no problems for nearly 10 years. If you go bigger than 7" and have a system that can draw 10" WC or better, you might want to go up (down) in gauge for the bigger ducts. https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....all&highlight=
    I think you're right Ole. I have a 5 HP collector & 8" duct & the 26g snap lock didn't feel like it would stand up. But for smaller sizes it should be okay

  7. #7
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    My duct is 26 gage snaplock...mostly from Oneida, but some from HD sold as "stove pipe". I'd love to have spiral or "quick connect" ducting in my next shop, but the snap-lock has performed very well. Getting the fittings right is the more important part of the whole design and operation, IMHO.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Getting the fittings right is the more important part of the whole design and operation, IMHO.
    That's right. The airflow doesn't care if the duct is snap lock or spiral, as long as it doesn't collapse. Long sweep fitting do make a difference though.

  9. #9
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    You can use 1/2" plywood around the piping to keep it from collapsing.

  10. #10
    I got my 5 inch snap lock from Home Depot because it seemed to be much sturdier than the stuff at Lowe's. I don't think I measured it, however, if I did I do not remember the gauge. But it works. Seems like they might have had two types too with the thinner stuff like the Lowes.

    I bought several fittings from "the sheet metal kid" I think he's in Idaho, someplace out west in any event. The wye's needed mastic at the joint but they work and fit the snap lock fine.

  11. #11
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    Jim, they do carry two types....the standard HVAC at 30 gage and the 26 gage "stove pipe" version, albeit usually only in 24" sections. At HD, I believe they have a silver/grey "logo" color to denote the heavier gage steel. 5' lengths are available from other sources and are more convenient for DC work in many cases.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    I bought 5 foot sections. Maybe I got lucky. In any event it works. Made a bit of sawdust today. Working on a sink base and a base cabinet. Fitting the sink was a pain, nice and big but that doesn't leave much room to support the countertop. But I got it.

  13. #13
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    I'm guessing that geography matters...in this area, the 'borg doesn't seem to carry the heavier stove pipe in 5' lengths. But I also suspect that there are far less folks who demand it for things like wood burning stoves than in other areas of the country, for example. (And local codes are pretty hard, often requiring the much more expensive double wall products)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
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    I thought "stove pipe" was normally black (if not stainless steel) not galvanized? Might be a local thing.
    NOW you tell me...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    I thought "stove pipe" was normally black (if not stainless steel) not galvanized? Might be a local thing.
    I've seen it both ways, Ole. Black is clearly for "visible' Installations when used as actual stove pipe.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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