Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 45 of 45

Thread: Help with HVLP Spayer Choice

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    I'm late to this thread but I'll agree with an earlier poster about using a conversion gun in the shop with a small compressor. It's unusual to be spraying continuously in the shop which gives your compressor time to 'catch up". I once sprayed something at a client's place with a pancake compressor. Just had to break up the job.

    Mike
    Since a lot of this is kinda new to me. Are you referring to a HVLP type of compressor driven gun? If you are based on my 6+ cfm at 40psi compressor I am about 60% of 10 cfm needed for most of the guns I have seen offering HVLP. While painiting that seems like quite a bit of "catch up" time. Your experience seems to indicate it's doable.

    I have not hit the purchase button yet but the slightly smaller spray pattern of a LVLP seems a resonable tradeoff. I am open to suggestions and common sense real world experience though and just want the most efficient solution.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    Since a lot of this is kinda new to me. Are you referring to a HVLP type of compressor driven gun? If you are based on my 6+ cfm at 40psi compressor I am about 60% of 10 cfm needed for most of the guns I have seen offering HVLP. While painiting that seems like quite a bit of "catch up" time. Your experience seems to indicate it's doable.

    I have not hit the purchase button yet but the slightly smaller spray pattern of a LVLP seems a resonable tradeoff. I am open to suggestions and common sense real world experience though and just want the most efficient solution.
    Yes, I use a HVLP conversion gun, which is a HVLP gun with a regulator at the air entry to the gun. The regulator reduces the pressure to something much lower - the regulator usually has a green band for you to set your initial pressure. I had to play with the pressure to get the results I wanted. You connect the gun to your regular air compressor which is usually around 90 PSI.

    I actually have a couple of conversion guns that I use to shoot shellac and water based lacquer (one each). I mostly use Target EM6000 water based. Clean up is easy.

    Mike

    [I've never even looked at it, but some people say the Harbor Freight conversion gun works well. You could get one and try out working with your compressor. Later you could get a name brand gun. The guy I learned spray work from told me that the cheap guns worked well but didn't hold up as well as the higher end guns. I found that if you thoroughly clean the gun, even a cheap one will last a long time. By cleaning I mean disassemble everything on the gun that the finish comes in contact and clean it well. Also avoid damaging the tapered pin that controls the spray (pull the trigger back when unscrewing the tip)]
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 10-20-2020 at 4:31 PM.
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,624
    Johh, the term HVLP merely refers to "High Volume Low Pressure". But "low pressure" is variable and the source of that pressure can be a compressor or a turbine. There will be some slight physical differences to the gun for each air source because of the way they connect. For my guns, which are "conversion guns" and run off compressor air, I use input pressure of 40 psi. I have a regulator on the port that I use exclusively for my spray guns. The PPS equipped gun mentioned earlier has another regulator on it that is used to set the pressure for inside the cup that holds the collapsable liner. That pressure pushes the fluid into the gun which is why you can hold it at any angle and also easily spray more viscous finishes. That regulator is set to about 5psi. The LPLV version, if I'm not mistaken, requires less from the compressor, but otherwise operates in a similar manner.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 10-21-2020 at 10:13 AM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Johh, the term HPLV merely refers to "High Pressure Low Volume". But "high pressure" isn't all that high and the source of that pressure can be a compressor or a turbine. There will be some slight physical differences to the gun for each air source because of the way they connect. For my guns, which are "conversion guns" and run off compressor air, I use input pressure of 40 psi. I have a regulator on the port that I use exclusively for my spray guns. The PPS equipped gun mentioned earlier has another regulator on it that is used to set the pressure for inside the cup that holds the collapsable liner. That pressure pushes the fluid into the gun which is why you can hold it at any angle and also easily spray more viscous finishes. That regulator is set to about 5psi. The LPLV version, if I'm not mistaken, requires less from the compressor, but otherwise operates in a similar manner.
    Isn't it High VOLUME Low Pressure? HVLP not HPLV
    I understand the bigger point

    I did finally find the the differences of performance between HVLP and LVLP in the smaller spray pattern of LV air supply, a tradeoff I can easily live with since I am not in a pro production environment.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,624
    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    Isn't it High VOLUME Low Pressure? HVLP not HPLV
    I understand the bigger point

    I did finally find the the differences of performance between HVLP and LVLP in the smaller spray pattern of LV air supply, a tradeoff I can easily live with since I am not in a pro production environment.
    Correct, I misspoke. My apologies. I try to be accurate, but sometimes, well...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Correct, I misspoke. My apologies. I try to be accurate, but sometimes, well...
    Sure glad I never make a mistake...lol

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,624
    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    Sure glad I never make a mistake...lol
    I edited the previous to fix my dyslexic thought conversion.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    So you want us to help you spend money on a compressor, too? LOL

    The good news is that Jeff has the setup in LVLP, too, which should make the compressor specifications more approachable. I went with HPLV because that's what I'm used to, but both types are available in the packages he puts together. I realize that doesn't answer your question, but it is the start of a pathway to the answer. Get the specifications for the gun(s) and then the community can better help.

    FYI, I use a 60 gallon IR that's been in my shop for many years. For spraying finish, I find that having a larger air supply is more important than raw SCFM and mine doesn't run all that much. Many guns are pretty forgiving, too.
    I thank you and all the others. Just ordered the AM-6008 LVLP kit gun with the siphon or botton feed cup. Probably add on the PPS cups in the near future after I get some other higher priority tools first.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/QualSpray-A...72.m2749.l2649

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,624
    Good choice, John. And do add the PPS system when you are able...it will really kick things up a notch, especially with higher viscosity stuff. MUCH easier cleanup, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,332
    I took Charles Neil's finishing course a number of years ago (RIP, Charles. Great guy and knew EVERYTHING). In it, he had everyone bring their own spray guns and turbines, and we got to try each other's setups. I had the Fuji 4-stage. Still do.

    That being said, while mine sprays great (as well as the newer T80 gun I got from them), the Apollo guns seemed to be a little more adjustable and easier to use.

    Once I got my Fuji gun dialed in (which really doesn't take long), it works great. I spray Chemcraft pre-cat lacquer out of the can without changing a thing.

    I definitely would go 4-stage if choosing HVLP. I can't offer advice on LVLP.

    Buy headphones for a turbine setup. Even though I have the quieter Fuji, they are very, annoyingly loud.

    Also, I would definitely buy the 3M PPS 2.0 system for whichever you choose. Definitely makes cleaner FAR easier. I just used up all my large original PPS system cups, so now changing over to their new version.
    - I have enough frequent flyer miles to orbit the sun. Sigh...
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off.
    - When you earnestly believe you can compensate for lack of skill by doubling your effort, there's no end to what you can't do

  11. #41
    Congrats on your purchase John and thanks to all for the good information. I have a similar compressor and purchased the same gun with PPSfrom Homestead a few weeks back. I researched conversion guns for about 2 weeks and most paths pointed me to Jeff Jewitt and Homestead products.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    6,867
    I'm sure you'll like the versatility and performance of that gun. The standard cup is pressurized and will work as was as the PPS cup except you can't see how much finish is still in the cup and when it runs dry it likely will sputter.

    John

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,624
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    I'm sure you'll like the versatility and performance of that gun. The standard cup is pressurized and will work as was as the PPS cup except you can't see how much finish is still in the cup and when it runs dry it likely will sputter.

    John
    The standard cup does limit the position you can hold the gun, especially when it isn't full. Since the PPS "cup" compresses with the pressurization behind it, there's never an air gap where the finish leaves the gun no matter how you you oritent it. But I agree that in the meantime, other than that "one thing", the gun that OP purchased will be a great addition to his shop until he can add the PPS system.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Alcini View Post
    Congrats on your purchase John and thanks to all for the good information. I have a similar compressor and purchased the same gun with PPSfrom Homestead a few weeks back. I researched conversion guns for about 2 weeks and most paths pointed me to Jeff Jewitt and Homestead products.
    Congrats to you too. Glad my thread helped certainly nothing I said was knowledgeable, just try ask the right questions..
    Have you had a chance to run some product through it yet? I made one attempt and had some pressure regulation issues with too long of a small hose. Got a better hose but been to busy and too cold when I had time to test it.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    6,867
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The standard cup does limit the position you can hold the gun, especially when it isn't full. Since the PPS "cup" compresses with the pressurization behind it, there's never an air gap where the finish leaves the gun no matter how you you oritent it. But I agree that in the meantime, other than that "one thing", the gun that OP purchased will be a great addition to his shop until he can add the PPS system.

    Good catch, Jim, thanks. I've gotten so used to the PPS system that I forgot about that key benefit. Being able to spray at any angle definitely is an advantage.

    John

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •