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Thread: Does particle board dull bandsaw blades?

  1. #1
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    Does particle board dull bandsaw blades?

    I do a lot of radius work and cut my templates and jigs out of particle board for cost saving reasons.

    Question is, will particle board do more damage to carbon steel band saw blades than typical hard/softwoods due to the glue content? I seem to go through band saw blades fairly frequently (or so I think, maybe its just the nature of these blades?).

    I am aware that particle board/plywood, etc will wreak havoc on all other steel cutters. Curious what everyone else does.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    yes it will. MDF also wears blades faster. One has to do what one has to do, but I wouldn't subject a premium blade to it.

  3. #3
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    Bandsaw blades are relatively easy to sharpen without even having to remove them from the saw. I've just done it once with a 3 TPI x 105" blade using a cut off wheel on a Dremel and it only took about 10 min and I was amazed how much better it cut.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    Bandsaw blades are relatively easy to sharpen without even having to remove them from the saw. I've just done it once with a 3 TPI x 105" blade using a cut off wheel on a Dremel and it only took about 10 min and I was amazed how much better it cut.
    How do you calibrate the grind and set? Do you clean up the gullet as well? We have a full profile grinder for bandmill blades that grinds the entire profile, hook, rake, gullet, but setting is the killer. Two bandsaws in the shop, latest I posted here, cant imagine how to sharpen and set by hand. Small saw maybe, but the one I posted with a 242" blade.. gosh I dont know how we could ever touch that up by hand.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  5. #5
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    Any material with glue and resins in it (plywood as well) will dull your cutters faster than material without. As for blade sharpening, you will have to decide is that is something you want to do or not. I touch up router bits many times before sending them off to the sharpener's. I sharpen twist and Forstner drill bits. I don't do bandsaw or circular blades as I rely on the geometry expected and I'm not sure I would duplicate that as well as I might want.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bolton View Post
    How do you calibrate the grind and set? Do you clean up the gullet as well? We have a full profile grinder for bandmill blades that grinds the entire profile, hook, rake, gullet, but setting is the killer. Two bandsaws in the shop, latest I posted here, cant imagine how to sharpen and set by hand. Small saw maybe, but the one I posted with a 242" blade.. gosh I dont know how we could ever touch that up by hand.
    I didn't worry about calibrating the grind or touch the set or gullet. I definitely didn't do a high tech sharpening job. Mine's a 14" Rockwell from the 60's with a riser block. My 1/2" 3 TPI blade was dull, it cut poorly with lot's of drift. I just touched each tooth for a couple seconds with the side of a cut off wheel on a Dremel. Didn't expect it would make much of a difference but thought I could get a little more out of it before replacing it. I was surprised how much better it cut and was basically drift free. Used it for resawing some 3 to 4" cherry and also curved cuts on 2" thick oak and cherry and pleased with the results. If I had a major resaw to do I might switch to a new blade but I might try this blade first.

  7. #7
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    The other day I learned that the Lowes (maybe a local thing) will not cut MDF with their saw. They will cut plywood/ particle board though. Had to drive across town to HD as a full sheet wouldn't fit into my car. The guy said that MDF dulls the blade pretty quickly.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zeller View Post
    The other day I learned that the Lowes (maybe a local thing) will not cut MDF with their saw. They will cut plywood/ particle board though. Had to drive across town to HD as a full sheet wouldn't fit into my car. The guy said that MDF dulls the blade pretty quickly.

    My local Lowes here in Tucson has cut down MDF on their panel saw for me on numerous occasions. The main thing is that you don't want to breath the MDF dust from cutting.
    David

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    I didn't worry about calibrating the grind or touch the set or gullet. I definitely didn't do a high tech sharpening job. Mine's a 14" Rockwell from the 60's with a riser block. My 1/2" 3 TPI blade was dull, it cut poorly with lot's of drift. I just touched each tooth for a couple seconds with the side of a cut off wheel on a Dremel. Didn't expect it would make much of a difference but thought I could get a little more out of it before replacing it. I was surprised how much better it cut and was basically drift free. Used it for resawing some 3 to 4" cherry and also curved cuts on 2" thick oak and cherry and pleased with the results. If I had a major resaw to do I might switch to a new blade but I might try this blade first.
    I might give it a go on some of the large resaw blades. Now that youve got me thinking it probably would be too awful bad to setup a simple little jig with a pin that references on the next gullet. Our nearest option for resharps with the shipping and sharpening makes it almost a toss them out option.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  10. #10
    40 years ago I was buying band saw blades from a place in Cincinnati that had automatic sharpening machines. For a couple years I sent my blades in for sharpening. I think it cost $3. for a 17' band. But the 3/8 - 1/2" blades I use are impulse hardened only at the very tip and when they came back from sharpening they dulled really quickly.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley Gray View Post
    40 years ago I was buying band saw blades from a place in Cincinnati that had automatic sharpening machines. For a couple years I sent my blades in for sharpening. I think it cost $3. for a 17' band. But the 3/8 - 1/2" blades I use are impulse hardened only at the very tip and when they came back from sharpening they dulled really quickly.
    Agreed, I do get to a point with the blades for the mill where it is no longer worth it but most often they just break. Its honestly not worth it period if you value your time to clean and sharpen them in-house forget about having to ship them.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  12. #12
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    I've cut MDF under low light conditions and I've seen sparks come off the blade. Perhaps some sand/dirt ??

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brice Rogers View Post
    I've cut MDF under low light conditions and I've seen sparks come off the blade. Perhaps some sand/dirt ??
    Back in the late 80's was cutting lifts of imported mdf, definitely tearing carbide blades up. Also heavier, 5x12 took two people most of the time to start cutting on it. Fortunately only about 15% was that size, most was 3x10. Sparks flew when cutting it. Boss said it was 60% cost versus domestic.Ron
    Ron

  14. #14
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    Perhaps sand or dirt or?
    David

  15. #15
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    I assume that MDF is made from logs that aren't of much use for anything else. If so I think it's safe to assume that it would include bark and anything that wasn't washed off like dirt and tiny rocks. If you've ever used a chainsaw in low light conditions you will also see sparks as you cut.

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