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Thread: Can Corian be cut with a hand plane?

  1. #1
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    Can Corian be cut with a hand plane?

    I want to cut a drip groove in my Corian countertop along a straight section. If I make a plane to wrap around the edge to make this cut, could it cut Corian?

    The groove will be about 1/8" x 1/8". I have to test this to be sure it is enough.

  2. #2
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    I've cut Corian using a carbide router bit with great success. Could be slow going using a hand plane, but it could work. Kitchen knives cut it, so a plane should also. You might try using a scratch stock. Hope you have some scraps to test your techniques.

  3. #3
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    Hdpe works well so I should think so. Will be curious to see your results.

  4. #4
    Like Dan I've cut Corian with a router bit. Why do you want to do it by hand? A router with a edge guide should do this quickly. They make 1/8" round nose bits with a 1/4" shank. For example, MLCS #6441.

    Mike
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  5. #5
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    I'd try a router bit. Some brands are a bit more brittle, and if you ever get the bright idea to run a self tapping screw into a pre-drilled hole, don't! The material is very brittle.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    I want to cut a drip groove in my Corian countertop along a straight section. If I make a plane to wrap around the edge to make this cut, could it cut Corian?

    The groove will be about 1/8" x 1/8". I have to test this to be sure it is enough.
    This sounds like your countertop may already be in place. To me this might be the reason for not wanting to use a router.

    If you search > drawer grooving planes < you will see some planes that will provide ideas on making your job specific plane.

    Take light cuts for best results.

    Many of us neanders already have planes to do jobs like this. You may have a woodworking friend nearby with a plow plane to do the job.

    jtk
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  7. #7
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    I've cut it with both a router and a chisel, about a decade ago(?). You'll be sharpening a bit as I recall and it comes off in weird chips, don't expect anything like a shaving.

    So, I think a plane will work
    ~mike

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  8. #8
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    I've cut, and machined a fair amount of it, back in the '80's, and into the '90's, when it was the cabinet top material of choice, before the Granite emergence. You'll be spending more time sharpening than masking everything off, for ease of cleanup, behind a router. I forget what the bits are called, but probably some kind of grooving bit, but it cuts off the outer diameter of a disk, rather than a straight bit.

  9. #9
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    Core box bit?

  10. #10
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    Yes the countertops are in place. I want to cut a groove on the underside to serve as a drip edge.

    I recently spilled water which ran off and down the face of the cabinets and into the drawers. That was messy but something like olive oil would be a little worse. Not wanting to go there I'm thinking that a drip edge along a few feet of straight countertop could really help.

    So maybe 3 blades on the plane would make a neat cut, left and right knickers and a straight cutter. What kind of steel would be needed?

    Maybe a short piece of a bandsaw blade would work.

  11. #11
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    I don't think you'd need knickers, there's no grain to cut neatly.


    edit: I'll just add that I used a chisel to clean up about 1/2" of linear cut. I'd pull out a tailed router.
    Last edited by mike stenson; 10-14-2020 at 9:05 PM.
    ~mike

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  12. #12
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    https://www.whitesiderouterbits.com/...tions/slotting

    Mask the cabinets below with paper, and have a helper hold a shop vac hose close.

    It cuts nicely with a sharp cutter. The question is how long anything softer than carbide will stay sharp. Maybe there is some carbide cutter you could use for a "plane", like one of the replacement ends for a turning tool. A V shaped cut/scratch should work.

  13. #13
    Tom, you could go buy a long scrap of corian and experiment to see if a hand plane would work. Go to a counter store and ask to buy one. If it costs you $20, that's cheap for a chance to test your idea.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
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  14. #14
    I would make a “plane” by gluing a stack of 3 sawzall metal blades into a block of wood with whatever fence arrangement is needed. That should quickly cut an 1/8 - 3/16” groove.

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  15. #15
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    I worked a good bit of it. It included inlaying stripes on the edge and such. The stuff is a bit brittle. When I laying stripes you had to be careful with the narrow piece between the stripes. If you taped too hard you could break it. I would not cut a straight grove close to the edge. If you bump the edge with a pan or something it will break on the sharp inside edge. 1/2” back or so may be OK. If it were me I try to find a piece same color or something of an accent color. Glue it on than route or sand the edge. The 1/2” wide is still necessary.

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