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Thread: Carcass saw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    Northeast WI
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    272

    Carcass saw

    So i have been considering getting the veritas rip carcass saw because of a youtube video i watched where someone demonstrates how it can cut tenons and dovetails. I have been getting tired of the little dozuki I have been using. The veritas is also a pretty affordable saw.

    Someone recently brought up bad axe tool works and i found they are based here in my home state of WI! They make good looking saws. But they are also higher priced than the veritas and even the lie nielsen.

    While that makes me sound like a cheapskate, is there anything about these saws that makes them so expensive? After some research it looks like they are hand made. I know skilled labor isn't cheap, so i assume that has a lot to do with it too.

    I want to buy local, and I want to buy quality, but I also look for value. I have heard wonderful things about both the veritas and the lie nielsen's, and i could buy both a veritas carcass saw and a lie nielsen dovetail saw for the price of a bad axe tenon saw.

    I realize making my own saw is an option too, but i have a few projects i need to get done and would rather just buy one and get to work.

    Anyone have any opinions on the bad axe saws? Am i better of buying a Veritas carcass for now and adding a lie nielsen down the road?

  2. #2
    The Bad Axe and the Bontz have wonderful reputations. (One day I'll own a Bontz.) You certainly can't go wrong with either of them - or several other boutique saws. I think they cost more money because they are essentially custom made and are therefore more finely tuned.

    I bought two of the Veritas (rip and crosscut). They are good quality and great value. I bought an LN dovetail saw a year ago - it's the one I reach for.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  3. #3
    Jason,

    With boutique saws you are paying for the "Bling" (full disclosure; I love saw bling), maybe a custom or at least semi custom tote and a well sharpened saw. Once you have used the saw for a very short time it will need sharpening. At that point the only difference between a boutique saw and say a Veritas is the bling and maybe a better fitting tote. While I love my Bad Axe saws, I love the Bling but my hands are so average the tote makes no never mind, the truth is my Veritas saws work just as well after a couple of times sharpening each. Still I love looking at and holding the Bad Axe saws and would expect the same from a Bontz saw.

    ken

  4. #4
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    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
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    I never realized there was a category of boutique saws. I guess in my inexperience I always thought of Lie Nielsen and Veritas as top of the line.

    Frederick and Ken,

    Thank you for the replies. At this point in my life i am more worried about functionality than glam, and being i dont have much experience sharpening, the more affordable Veritas may be a good set of training wheels.

    Is a rip carcass a good choice for a joinery saw? The video i saw showed it capable of both dovetails and tenons, and while it may not be optimized for either task it seemed like a good all around saw.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
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    3,062
    I can attest to the fact that the Ron Bontz and the Bad Axe saws are really nice, especially in how they look. My Bad Axe saw is probably my easiest starting saw so I need to be careful when I jump from it to a more aggressive saw; because the more aggressive saw is more likely to catch and jump out of the cut if I am not used to it.

    That said, I really like the Lee Valley dovetail saw. When my Bad Axe saw was no longer sharp, I sent it back for sharpening. When my Lee valley saw was dull, I was not as worried about take a shot at a less expensive saw and it resharpened just fine; even though a professional sharpener would probably scoff at it.

    Nothing wrong with the Lee Valley saw, it is simply not as pretty; and you probably cannot get a handle sized to your hand.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Northern California
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    269
    Well if you want to “buy one and get to work”, forget about Bad Axe. I have 2 (sash and tenon) that I bought years ago and waited about 5-6 weeks for them to be delivered. I’ve heard the wait time is even longer now, what with COVID and the recent passing of Mark’s wife. Sometimes they have a few saws available immediately, but that’s hit or miss depending on your needs. As Ken noted they’re very nice saws but I have a few old Disstons (carcass and sash) that cut just as well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
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    I started off using the two Veritas carcass saws, rip and crosscut. I eventually got a Veritas 14 tpi dovetail saw. The rip carcass saw does work for dovetailing, but it is a little rough to use once the stock gets down around 1/2” thick. If I was going to do it again I’d just get the crosscut carcass saw and the dovetail saw, then get a bigger tenon saw. I’m happy with the quality of all of them.

    i do use the rip carcass saw for cutting tenons, and it works well on small pieces. It doesn’t have enough depth of cut to do tenons for bigger stuff.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2019
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    Northeast WI
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    Stephen,

    Yes i failed to take that into account. You are right that they have a 10-12 week lead right now.

    Andrew,

    It sounds like a lie nielsen or veritas may be a better choice for my needs right now. While having a handle tailored to your hand would be nice, i dont feel im at the skill level that it would make a difference for me.

    Maybe i will put in an order for the veritas and get back to work. I still have my little japanese saw while i wait for the veritas to ship.

  9. #9
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    Ben,

    Good to know. I typically work with 3/4" stock. My little japanese saw was not that good with that. When i did a test piece in some 1/2" cedar with the Japanese saw it worked better.

    Is the cross cut carcass a more useful saw?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    336
    I really like my Lie Nielsen carcass saw.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    The old pueblo in el norte.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Johnson View Post
    I really like my Lie Nielsen carcass saw.
    I do too, but mine's the old one.. and every saw is unobtanium @ LNs website.

    Ya notice that pretty much every recreational type item has become almost impossible to purchase?
    ~mike

    scope creep

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    194
    There are even fancier saws across the pond.

    https://www.skeltonsaws.co.uk/

  13. #13
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    Dec 2019
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    The old pueblo in el norte.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rafael Herrera View Post
    There are even fancier saws across the pond.

    https://www.skeltonsaws.co.uk/
    Gorgeous, but I'm not sure I can justify 500 quid currently.. maybe after I take over the world..
    ~mike

    scope creep

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
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    What makes these saws fancier? I realize this may be a stupid question, but i cant see any real difference between those or a florip or a bad axe. Is it the materials? They all appear to have the same style handle and fittings and things. I guess im still a peasant.

  15. #15
    Whatever saw you get, use it. And if there is a spot or 2 on the handle that is uncomfortable, fix it. It's your saw.

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