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Thread: Second Hand Plane to Get?

  1. #1
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    Second Hand Plane to Get?

    I recently purchased a wood river low angle block plane and find it quite useful and have become addicted to hand planes and need to feed the beast.

    What would be the most useful second plane to get? I was thinking jointing plane but hope to buy an 10 inch Wahuda bench jointer soon. Smoothing, Bench?

    I do some cabinet type projects and a variety of misc type projects (no specific discipline), have a CNC, 12" bench planer, good sized combo sander, table saw etc.

  2. #2
    Hello John
    I suggest a secondhand plane, a Stanley Bailey no.51/2...
    And if I may also suggest a second hand plane, a no.4 for a smoother.

    Get one that has a chunky sole, (base) as many longer planes are lapped incorrectly and thin at the front and back.
    You need good pictures of the plane from front and back to see if this is the case.
    The usual no hairline cracks, damaged handles, and iron with plenty of life in it is what I'd be looking for.
    I don't care about slight rusting so much.


    Since you will be covering more area with a proper plane,
    learn to set the cap iron if you are getting tearout,
    David Weaver (youtube David W) has probably the best and most information out there, if you want to use a double iron plane well.
    Many folk will advocate hindering how to use a Bailey in various ways, and yet still too proud to admit it, and use scrapers dimensioning flat work
    It will make a huge difference if your timbers are cranky.

    Another cheap as you can get, no.4 or 5 for a jack/scrub if your working reclaimed timbers, before the machine sees it.

    Tom

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    I recently purchased a wood river low angle block plane and find it quite useful and have become addicted to hand planes and need to feed the beast.

    What would be the most useful second plane to get? I was thinking jointing plane but hope to buy an 10 inch Wahuda bench jointer soon. Smoothing, Bench?

    I do some cabinet type projects and a variety of misc type projects (no specific discipline), have a CNC, 12" bench planer, good sized combo sander, table saw etc.
    John,

    First do not waste your money on the jointer. Even a good, heavy jointer is the least needed tool in the shop. I did a quick look at Amazon and the 6" was around $400 USD, for that you can buy a good benchtop planer like the DeWalt. Add a pre-war Stanley #5 with a couple of cutters and you are set.

    ken

    John,

    I just re-read your post and see I missed your having a bench top planer. The advice still stands, do not waste your money. it is easy to "skip" plane one side then use the planer to true your board up.
    Last edited by ken hatch; 10-09-2020 at 9:10 PM.

  4. #4
    John, I have a jointer plane and I almost never use it. I'd get a No. 3 or a No.4 smoothing plane. I have both and use them all the time. Since I learned how to sharpen properly, I almost never use sandpaper - my finish goes on the planed surface and it's lovely.

    Welcome to the slippery slope!
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Just get a decent #5 jack/fore plane.....learn ti use it. Then either a #3 OR #4 smooth plane.....

    The Jack can be used to not only skip plane a board relatively flat, it can reasonably joint most edges....usually up to 4' long ( BTDTGTTS), and...set with a straight edged iron, can be a LONG bed smoother.

    The #3 vs the #4......the #3 can get into places the #4 can't, is a tad lighter....and the iron is 1/4" narrower.....

    IF, after a while....you feel like a "true" jointer plane...either a #6 or a #7.....both can also flatten glued up panels. The #8 will wear you out, hard to keep level on a surface like a 3/4" wide edge...iron is 2-5/8" wide, after all...plane weighs in at around 10 pounds. The #5-1/2, the #6, and the #7 all take the same width iron..2-3/8" wide....main difference is the length of the sole.

    So...next plane? Get a jack plane....does a lot of jobs decently enough...bevel up vs bevel down? Meh.....I prefer bevel down...

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Just get a decent #5 jack/fore plane.....learn ti use it. Then either a #3 OR #4 smooth plane.....

    The Jack can be used to not only skip plane a board relatively flat, it can reasonably joint most edges....usually up to 4' long ( BTDTGTTS), and...set with a straight edged iron, can be a LONG bed smoother.

    The #3 vs the #4......the #3 can get into places the #4 can't, is a tad lighter....and the iron is 1/4" narrower.....

    IF, after a while....you feel like a "true" jointer plane...either a #6 or a #7.....both can also flatten glued up panels. The #8 will wear you out, hard to keep level on a surface like a 3/4" wide edge...iron is 2-5/8" wide, after all...plane weighs in at around 10 pounds. The #5-1/2, the #6, and the #7 all take the same width iron..2-3/8" wide....main difference is the length of the sole.

    So...next plane? Get a jack plane....does a lot of jobs decently enough...bevel up vs bevel down? Meh.....I prefer bevel down...
    Pretty much what Steven said,

    ken

  7. #7
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    Besides block the three I use the most are #3, 4 and 4 1/2. I also have a #2, #5, # 5 1/2 and a #6; If I was rebuilding after a big fire or a theft I would be looking for either a 4 or a 4 1/2 right away.

  8. #8
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    Interesting perspective on the jointer. I have no dog in the race but quite a few other experienced woodworker sing the praises of a jointer and how essential it is.

    Based on your and other posts I am looking hard at the 4 or 4-1/2's. Some say the 4's are a little small for man sized hands

  9. #9
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    Being able to face/edge joint is essential. How you do that, is another question entirely. Personally, I'm happier with a longer bed than a shorter one in a machine, no matter the width. Then again, my powermatic goes largely unused and I'll just use a jack most of the time.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    Interesting perspective on the jointer. I have no dog in the race but quite a few other experienced woodworker sing the praises of a jointer and how essential it is.

    Based on your and other posts I am looking hard at the 4 or 4-1/2's. Some say the 4's are a little small for man sized hands
    I am 5'10" and fit into the average north american male build (slightly stocky) I find the 4 has about the perfect size handle, not to huge where my hand can move around and not to small where it's cramped like on a transitional. I personally like the horn slightly touching my hand. Same with saws, I find the hand saws with huge handles not as easy to control or comfortable.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    Interesting perspective on the jointer. I have no dog in the race but quite a few other experienced woodworker sing the praises of a jointer and how essential it is.

    Based on your and other posts I am looking hard at the 4 or 4-1/2's. Some say the 4's are a little small for man sized hands
    Are yo looking to get a new Lie Nielsen, Veritas, wood river... or a old vintage plane?

    Here is a quick pic of a 4-1/2, 4, and 3
    20201010_124724.jpg
    20201010_124602.jpg
    20201010_124649.jpg
    20201010_124611.jpg
    It does not mater what you buy next it will soon have friends

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin sherriff View Post
    Are yo looking to get a new Lie Nielsen, Veritas, wood river... or a old vintage plane?

    Here is a quick pic of a 4-1/2, 4, and 3
    20201010_124724.jpg
    20201010_124602.jpg
    20201010_124649.jpg
    20201010_124611.jpg
    It does not mater what you buy next it will soon have friends
    At first I was thinking Wood River since I am pretty happy with low angle block plane I have so far. I looked at the Lie Nielson and I am sure it's really nice but a budget buster and probably will laugh at me learning, lol. The Veritas isn't a lot more than the WR and both of those are candidates. The new Stanley's get some good ink. Is it hype or are they over permformers for the price point?

  13. #13
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    Is it hype or are they over permformers for the price point?
    There are many considerations involved in purchasing a plane or any other tool. At one time a major consideration for me was the cost. Having more time than money it was my choice to buy inexpensive used tools. Bringing them to usable and even into fine shape wasn't difficult.

    Others may be short on time and long on finances. The refinement of modern machining on tools from Lee Valley and Lie-Nielsen have benefits. Some do not like the backlash or slop in some of the depth or lateral adjusters on older planes. Others like the appearance of a new tool.

    John, From what you mention in your original post you might find a Stanley #5 size plane (commonly referred to as a jack plane) to be useful. For a panel wider than your bench top planer it would be good for flattening or smoothing. It could also help to remove any marks left by a power jointer.

    The great thing about the #5 size plane is it was possibly the most common size purchased by carpenters and woodworkers of the bygone era. This makes them less expensive than any other size. You may find as your hand plane usage expands having more than one #5. They can be used for many functions.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    At first I was thinking Wood River since I am pretty happy with low angle block plane I have so far. I looked at the Lie Nielson and I am sure it's really nice but a budget buster and probably will laugh at me learning, lol. The Veritas isn't a lot more than the WR and both of those are candidates. The new Stanley's get some good ink. Is it hype or are they over permformers for the price point?
    I would go with a vintage stanley and stay away from the new ones. A nice vintage can be had for less than the price of the new ones.

    Veritas over wood river look at the used prices of Veritas they hold the value. Wood river had better prices befor the tariffs now the price between Veritas is worth the jump in my opinion.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    I recently purchased a wood river low angle block plane and find it quite useful and have become addicted to hand planes and need to feed the beast.
    Drop me a PM.

    I've got spares in need of a good home.

    Right here in Taxachusetts.

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