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Thread: Second Hand Plane to Get?

  1. #31
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    So far. on this little box project...I have used a WR 62....a Millers Falls No. 11 ( Stanley #5-1/4) as a jointer, and today a Stanley No.4, Type 10,,
    Chisel box, square an end.JPG
    Chisel box, Junior Jack plane.JPG
    Chisel box, saw marks removal.JPG
    The No. 4 also planed the sides of the box nice and smooth

    There was one other plane needed..
    Chisel box, having a bit of fun.JPG
    Stanley No. 45, Type 20

    Ymmv, according to the size of the project being worked on..

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Robinson View Post
    I’ve concluded that anything more than three planes is for collectors (like many of us become) or professional woodworkers (who do a lot of linear feet of a variety of planing task). I’ve found that lately I seem to keep a 102 block plane, a number 4 and a number 6 on the bench. With the number 6 getting more and more play time....
    It really depends on what a person does whether amateur, hobbyist or professional.

    With only the three planes mentioned how do you cut slots for box bottoms?

    Cutting Grooves with #50.jpg

    Or rabbets?

    #778 on Poplar.jpg

    It is convenient to have a shoulder plane to clean up a rough rabbet:

    #93 on Poplar.jpg

    Having a plane to round over a sharp shoulder is also an improvement on leaving things rough:

    #2 Round on Poplar.jpg

    Before all of this was done the pieces were trued with a #6 and smoothed with a #3 & #4.

    It is true one can do basic joining, flattening and smoothing with a three plane set up. Especially if one is working the same projects repeatedly. If one is always making different sizes of different objects it is easier to work with tools sized for the job.

    A realistic way to determine what planes one should acquire is to first determine which plane is the best suited for what one wants it to do.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #33
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    Sep 2019
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    Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Patterson View Post
    Without a doubt a smoother. I would suggest a #4. The #4 in addition to smoothing can do some short jointing as well. I would work with these two planes for a while before looking to add anymore planes. Good luck.
    Thank you all for your suggestions. I have a lead on a used "family" of 3, 4 and 5 planes that look in be in very good condition.

  4. #34
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    Sep 2019
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    Central Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    It really depends on what a person does whether amateur, hobbyist or professional.

    With only the three planes mentioned how do you cut slots for box bottoms?

    Cutting Grooves with #50.jpg

    Or rabbets?

    #778 on Poplar.jpg

    It is convenient to have a shoulder plane to clean up a rough rabbet:

    #93 on Poplar.jpg

    Having a plane to round over a sharp shoulder is also an improvement on leaving things rough:

    #2 Round on Poplar.jpg

    Before all of this was done the pieces were trued with a #6 and smoothed with a #3 & #4.

    It is true one can do basic joining, flattening and smoothing with a three plane set up. Especially if one is working the same projects repeatedly. If one is always making different sizes of different objects it is easier to work with tools sized for the job.

    A realistic way to determine what planes one should acquire is to first determine which plane is the best suited for what one wants it to do.

    jtk
    Jim

    I may have been a bit over simplistic to make a point in response to the OPs question about which “second” plane to get. But your point is taken and certainly valid.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
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    John, I'm kind of a beginner in planes but now have several. I bought a used Lie-Nielson No. 4 Smooth Plane in bronze from Ebay about 7 years ago. It was a very good price but the blade was hollow ground and it cost me $20 to have a machinist square the blade and flat grind the face. I use this plane most often of the planes I own.

  6. #36
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    N. Idaho
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    All I can add is be careful. One cat leads to two cats leads to cat lady.... (and there's nothing wrong with cat ladies, right?)
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  7. #37
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    Careful...they do tend to "multiply"...
    The Smoothers, No. 4 size.JPG
    No. 4 sized smoothers...or...
    The Smoothers, No. 3 size.JPG
    The No. 3 sized smoothers....

    jack planes are just as bad....

  8. #38
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    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
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    I am late to this discussion. I’m not sure if you closed the deal on the set you mentioned. My initial thought was similar to Steven’s recommendation of a #5. Then my second thought was it doesn’t matter because I suspect within a few weeks you will buy another one followed by a some sharpening stones or diamond stones. You are likely to add #4 to your collection followed by either a jointer or shoulder plane. Then you might get pulled into the molding plane vortex or the woody bug. So many planes and so little time. Then there are chisels and on it goes. Keep us posted.

  9. #39
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    Sep 2019
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    Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Careful...they do tend to "multiply"...
    The Smoothers, No. 4 size.JPG
    No. 4 sized smoothers...or...
    The Smoothers, No. 3 size.JPG
    The No. 3 sized smoothers....

    jack planes are just as bad....
    Mine grew from one to 4 just like that.

  10. #40
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    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe A Faulkner View Post
    I am late to this discussion. I’m not sure if you closed the deal on the set you mentioned. My initial thought was similar to Steven’s recommendation of a #5. Then my second thought was it doesn’t matter because I suspect within a few weeks you will buy another one followed by a some sharpening stones or diamond stones. You are likely to add #4 to your collection followed by either a jointer or shoulder plane. Then you might get pulled into the molding plane vortex or the woody bug. So many planes and so little time. Then there are chisels and on it goes. Keep us posted.
    I found a used set in good condition consisting of a 3, 4 and 5 brand name "Record" for a price less than I could get one plane of medium quality. Also found some good raw "chip" stock

  11. #41
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    Also found some good raw "chip" stock
    Maybe it is my age and not understanding the language of younger folks. What is "good raw "chip" stock"?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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