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Thread: turning redbud

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Kansas City
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    turning redbud

    I couldn't find any previous thread on the redbud. I might have access to a burly redbud tree and wondering if its worth the effort of saving some burls. I've not seen anyone turning it around here, despite it being a very common tree. Anyone had worthwhile results? I don't want to commit if its not good turning wood.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Fredericksburg, TX
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    It is not common to find, but definitely worth turning. I was given a section about 8"Dx 18L about 20 years back and turned a twice turned a couple of bowls and a side grain hollow form (had open pith sides). Did find that wood moved quite a bit drying and subject to checking so seal well. Also remember some smell in turning, but the coloration and grain of the wood worth the effort to turn. I just don't have opportunity to get my hands on more to turn. The burly tree should definitely have some good wood.

  3. #3
    Redbud has gorgeous color after darkening from exposure to sunlight. The differential shrinkage (tangential versus radial) is higher than most woods but makes especially interesting once turned bowls. Dry slowly, and expect up to 20% to crack while drying, especially live/natural edge.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    I couldn't find any previous thread on the redbud. I might have access to a burly redbud tree and wondering if its worth the effort of saving some burls. I've not seen anyone turning it around here, despite it being a very common tree. Anyone had worthwhile results? I don't want to commit if its not good turning wood.
    Not common wood. I have a small redbud log now someone brought.

    I cut a tree into blanks once and dried them and turned some things. The wood is fine grained and the color can be great. I think it's well worth turning.

    I've never, ever, seen a redbud burl.

    JKJ

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
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    After 35 years of turning, I have yet to find a burl not worth turning. Redbud can have heart rot and often star checking in the pith. It has great color.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Carterville, Illinois
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    I had a redbud tree that was destroyed in a storm and got a couple of logs off it. Small, about 6" diameter and lots of knots, but the wood has very nice grain and color. Turns like a lot of other woods with no real problem once dried.
    Tom
    The hurrier I goes, the behinder I gets.

  7. #7
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    Apr 2013
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    Thanks everyone. This tree Im looking at has a lot of rot in the middle so I need to think about how to cut it carefully. I am glad that redbud has some color to it as I've been disappointed by other common smaller trees. Yes, its very common around here (western Missouri) but never in large millable sizes. Assessing and handling tree burls sounds like a subject worth more attention.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Notasulga Alabama
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    Very prone to develop large cracks! One of the worst.

  9. #9
    I have only had a few pieces. It did cut a little rough or kind of stringy. I think you could make some nice boxes out of it. We don't have much of it out here in Oregon, but where I grew up in Missery, it was all over the place. Beautiful spring flowers.

    robo hippy

  10. #10
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    Feb 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard shelby View Post
    Very prone to develop large cracks! One of the worst.
    By "develop" do you mean if left in log form before turning, if cut into blanks, or in the object after turning green?

    I cut the tree I had into turning blanks without the pith, sealed the end grain and air dried in the shop. I don't think I lost any. It was far more stable than blanks I cut from one holly log, the worst I've ever seen! But I've seen a huge variability in specific trees in the same species - maybe I got lucky with a stable redbulog.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Missouri
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    Here is one I turned from Red Bud. Although most comments were not great, it sold fast Red Bud HF

  12. #12
    Because the differential shrinkage ratio is so high I would not rough out a turned lidded box from green red bud.

  13. #13
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    Apr 2013
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    Thanks for the detailed info.

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