Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 42 of 42

Thread: Price of dominoes

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,045
    Albert, making the 14mm is likely a bit easier than the smaller stock, honestly. Material that thick is a bit more stable when you're cutting and milling it. But I personally prefer to just continue buying the 750mm long stock and quickly cutting to length at the bandsaw for an individual project. Fast and efficient.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #32
    I made a little sled to cut dominos to length for my new bandsaw yesterday. I've been doing it on the table saw but I don't like cutting little pieces on that tool. Bandsaw seems safer. I mostly store 3 foot pieces of prepared stock. That is the width of my assembly table where I store the sticks.

    A big reason I make them is the desire to use "normal" sized tenons.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    356
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Albert, making the 14mm is likely a bit easier than the smaller stock, honestly. Material that thick is a bit more stable when you're cutting and milling it. But I personally prefer to just continue buying the 750mm long stock and quickly cutting to length at the bandsaw for an individual project. Fast and efficient.
    I know. But I gave all my hardwood “scraps” to a woodworking friend a couple of weeks back.... tools and timber, you will need it the week after you got rid of it...

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    A big reason I make them is the desire to use "normal" sized tenons.
    what do you mean by normal ?

    The cutters are still metric size diameters and the plunge is still limited by the machine, so ??????

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    what do you mean by normal ?

    The cutters are still metric size diameters and the plunge is still limited by the machine, so ??????
    I took this to mean wider. I sometimes use multiple cuts with the Domino machine to make regular traditional mortises, then mill an actual tenon into the mating part.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,914
    I do the same as Johnny. It’s a nice accurate way to make mortise and tenon joinery something not know till one owns a Domino. It’s not the only perk the woodworking artisan has with the domino. But a good one.
    Aj

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    black river falls wisconsin
    Posts
    866
    i would not make thr small dominos but the 12 mm and 14mm dominos are pricey so can spend hour or 2 on making and save couple hundred dollars.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    I took this to mean wider. I sometimes use multiple cuts with the Domino machine to make regular traditional mortises, then mill an actual tenon into the mating part.
    Ok, I see what you mean now.

    I do the same as Johnny. It’s a nice accurate way to make mortise and tenon joinery something not know till one owns a Domino. It’s not the only perk the woodworking artisan has with the domino. But a good one.
    Is it accurate ?

    How do you precisely control the width; make a jig ? but, then is that adjustable ? Or-are you just utilizing the max oscillation setting on the domino and making that your "wider' ?

    My horizontal mortiser has stops that control the width up to the max of the table travel. I like my Domino, but the second I need or want to step outside its limited size range, its value quickly diminishes.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    473
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    Good day all:

    Why would larger dominoes be so much cheaper than the smaller ones? Large are available in bulk and not small, and the price per domino is way cheaper. This is except the largest one, which suddenly becomes way more expensive. (Same price for 500 as for 1800 of one slightly smaller.)

    Attachment 442452

    I would suspect it based on the volume they manufacture by size. When they make more stuff in a run it is cheaper. Thanks Brian
    Brian

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,045
    Dave, it's easy to cut wider mortises with the Domino/DominoXL. it merely requires placing a mark that is exactly half the width of the physical Domino tenon stock assiciated with the cutter size being used from the ends of the intended mortise, cutting those two ends with the machine on the "tight" setting and then moving the machine laterally to hog out the material. If there are multiple to do, one can make a simple little marking gauge to speed up making those two pencil marks that define the mortise ends. Think of the tool in this context as a very portable horizontal mortiser. And yes, I have done this with my DominoXL on two projects. (I've also used a biscuit machine in the same way to make a slot for splines...)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    902
    I’m not questioning easy or possible. I’m questioning “accurate”

    requires placing a mark that is exactly half the width of the physical Domino tenon stock associated
    tells me all I really need to know, and does nothing to convince me it is as accurate and repeatable as a physical stop like a pin or paddle. Pencil layout kinda defeats the speed associated with the design too. Part of the orig. beauty/benefit of domino is it’s not necessary to do mark out for use.

    Yall’s technique possible ? Sure. And I recognize that something that works for you may not for me or others.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    57,045
    Dave, the marks are necessary during normal use so that the mortises are lined up on both sides of the joint. But you can use physical stops with the Domino (and it has provisions for pins built in) if you want to index the holes that way. Don't underestimate how accurate the mortise placement is by placing the cursor on the mark, however. Yea, if you use a fat construction pencil, you're hosed, but if you use a fine line, it's going to be right where it needs to be for woodworking purposes. I've done a line of them all on the "tight" setting (inadvertently) and had zero issue putting things together.

    But clearly, this may not be the tool for you and that's ok. There are a bunch of ways to do loose tenon joinery and other forms of M&T. Use what you prefer. But those of us that use a different method are merely using a different method. It's not better or worse.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •