Page 12 of 21 FirstFirst ... 28910111213141516 ... LastLast
Results 166 to 180 of 305

Thread: California to ban internal combustion engine cars by 2035

  1. #166
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,321
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    There is an optional TOU plan, but you would be crazy to use it.
    45 cents per kW? I thought our electric was expensive at 22 cents/kW. Sounds like a deliberate disincentive.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    I see they added a specific rate plan for electric vehicle charging. It requires a separate meter for the electric car charging circuit(s). Power is only available from 11 pm to 7 am and is charged at 4.5 cents per KWh.
    What are the hidden delivery charges on top of that?

    We installed a 220 leg off our subpanel (from house expansion, before we owned it) to run my Bandsaw and Jointer. I just changed the socket to fit my Siemens charge point. It would be pretty simple to meter just that outlet.

    That said, my out of pocket cost compared to gas motors on the same daily driving is running 1/3 to 1/2 less than on gasoline, even at $1.80/gallon.

    The real plus is avoiding gas stations - I plug in at home.

  2. #167
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    That trip should be doable in 5 to 6 hours depending on what type of highways exist between the two points. It is a trip that many drivers could easily do straight through with a stop for fuel. I personally don't think an extra 20 minutes to refuel is a big deal, but I am sure it is a big deal to some drivers.

    I would like to get an electric vehicle, but nobody makes a full electric mini-van yet and I wouldn't buy one if it was over about $30,000. (I realize a lot of gasoline mini-vans are over $30,000, but I only paid $20,000 for my 2016 Grand Caravan SE.) I have solar, but solar doesn't really help much since my vehicle isn't at home much of the time the sun is shining. A lot will change by 2030 and a reasonable electrical vehicle will probably be an option by then. I have a motorhome too. There is an electric version coming out, but it has a whole 200 mile range with four hours to charge! I get at least 800 miles per tank in my motorhome because the tank is huge.
    Iíd be interested in an electric pick up. 500 mi is as far as I like to go without taking a break to eat and walk around a little, so a 500 mi range and 30 min charge time would work. Assuming there was a charger available at the gas station or whatever. If there was a few people in line that 30 min stop would turn into hours in a hurry.

  3. #168
    Most, if not all, of the Major US oil companies have business plans in place that anticipate ALL new light utility vehicles in the world will be EVs by 2040 (give or take a couple years, depending on which you look at) - - government decree or not. 'Light Utility' being defined as anything from 1/2t truck or smaller. ...Lifestyle adjustments may be necessary?

    Your guess is as good as mine - or Big Oil's - if it will come to pass.

  4. #169
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New Westminster BC
    Posts
    1,528
    I've always been puzzled by power generation in Hawaii. Been there half a dozen times and it seems the wind is always blowing and the sun shines 300+ days a year, plus with the volcanic action, there must be lot's of geothermal potential. There is no oil, gas or coal on the islands. Given all that I would have expected them to be an early adopter of wind, solar and geothermal power yet the majority (around 90%) of electricity on the islands is still generated from fossil fuels and they have the highest electricity rates in the country when they could have among the lowest.

  5. #170
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Northern Oregon
    Posts
    1,707
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Helmich View Post
    Assuming there was a charger available at the gas station or whatever. If there was a few people in line that 30 min stop would turn into hours in a hurry.
    Good point Ben.
    "Whether you think you can, or you think you canít - youíre right."
    - Henry Ford

  6. #171
    Here in California there's so much solar installed that the cheapest rates are when the sun is shining. The highest rates are from sundown to about 9pm.

    So you can't make money pushing your solar generated electricity back to the grid - the rates are too low.

    Mike

    [Regarding chargers when you're traveling: Tesla (and I suppose others) show you the locations of chargers and tell you whether they're in use or not. Probably even tell you if there are people waiting.]
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 10-19-2020 at 7:43 PM.
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  7. #172
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    4,380
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Matthews View Post
    45 cents per kW? I thought our electric was expensive at 22 cents/kW. Sounds like a deliberate disincentive.

    What are the hidden delivery charges on top of that?
    The TOU rate is not intended for a typical house. This was the rate that was originally for electric cars and other things that could easily run only at night. The intent was either to meter just the electric car circuits, or to meter a detached garage that uses little power. It allowed charging or other power use during the day if need be.

    The electric car rate has no extra delivery charges. There is a power cost adjustment that is generally in the hundredths of a cent and can be a credit some months.

  8. #173
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Clayton , North Carolina
    Posts
    146
    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mann View Post
    The problem I have with electric cars is not range. More charging stations are showing up every day. The problem I have is refueling time. A fill up takes an hour or more even using the Tesla "Super charger" stations. Off brand charging stations charge at the rate of 5 or 10 miles of range per hour of charge. Building more charge stations won't fix that problem. I am waiting for another technological breakthrough to solve the slow charge problem.

    On another subject, what do you suppose the price of electricity is going to do when the overwhelming majority of drivers depend on it? My prediction is that it will cost the same per mile as gasoline does today. Unfortunately, that dramatic increase in price will also apply to electricity for your home. Electricity prices in California are already 3 times what they are where I live.
    There is been some work done with embedding charging coils into the roadways so that electric vehicles will be charged as they move similar to those systems that charge cell phones and tablets without a physical connection. I would think that such things are a looong ways down the road ( so to speak).

  9. #174
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,713
    Thomas, there's a project somewhere in the EU right now to do just that with a short bus route (only about a mile) as a proof of concept project, if I'm not mistaken.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #175
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    269
    Late to this discussion, so I donít know if this has been mentioned (Iím not going to read through all the posts). The banning of new gas powered vehicles beginning in 2035 is an executive order from the current Governor. An executive order can be overruled by the courts or legislature, or can be negated by a future Governor. I live in California. There are many entities (residents and businesses) that are very unhappy with this decree, so it would not surprise me if it did not take effect.

  11. #176
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Posts
    2,523
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    I've always been puzzled by power generation in Hawaii. Been there half a dozen times and it seems the wind is always blowing and the sun shines 300+ days a year, plus with the volcanic action, there must be lot's of geothermal potential. There is no oil, gas or coal on the islands. Given all that I would have expected them to be an early adopter of wind, solar and geothermal power yet the majority (around 90%) of electricity on the islands is still generated from fossil fuels and they have the highest electricity rates in the country when they could have among the lowest.
    I visited the Big Island Hawaii several times and thought that the wind farm up on the North side made sense since the wind always seemed to blow, that was the end of the line and power could be fed backward toward main power, and all the fuel for power generation had to be imported. Then one trip, not one of the wind turbines were turning. Locals told me there was not enough wind. Green power energy does have some limitations and needs a backup plan.

  12. #177
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,321
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Canfield View Post
    Then one trip, not one of the wind turbines were turning. Locals told me there was not enough wind. Green power energy does have some limitations and needs a backup plan.
    https://www.highviewpower.com/
    Compressed (liquid) air


    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics...g/flow-battery
    Industrial scale "flow" batteries


    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...ty-appliances/
    Flywheel arrays

    These are currently available, mature storage media.

    While there are days when the wind doesn't blow fast enough to turn the blades, more often Wind farms are idled because of grid curtailment - there's no immediate demand for the power produced.

  13. #178
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Anaheim, California
    Posts
    6,133
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Rosenthal View Post
    Late to this discussion, so I donít know if this has been mentioned (Iím not going to read through all the posts). The banning of new gas powered vehicles beginning in 2035 is an executive order from the current Governor. An executive order can be overruled by the courts or legislature, or can be negated by a future Governor. I live in California. There are many entities (residents and businesses) that are very unhappy with this decree, so it would not surprise me if it did not take effect.
    That reminds me of an old joke:
    A thief was caught in the act and sentenced to die. Hauled up before the king, he was asked by the Royal Presence: "Is there any reason at all why I shouldn't have your head off right now?" To which he replied: "Oh, King, live forever! Know that I am the greatest teacher in your kingdom, and it would surely be a waste to kill such a great teacher. So skilled am I that I could even teach your favorite horse to sing, given a year to work on it." The king was amused, and said: "Very well then, you move into the stable immediately, and if the horse isn't singing a year from now, we'll think of something interesting to do with you."

    As he was returning to his cell to pick up his spare rags, his cellmate remonstrated with him: "Now that was really stupid. You know you can't teach that horse to sing, no matter how long you try." His response: "Not at all. I have a year now that I didn't have before. And a lot of things can happen in a year. The king might die. The horse might die. I might die.

    "And, who knows? Maybe the horse will sing."
    Feel free to come back in 15 years to say, "I told you so."
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  14. #179
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    3,967
    Your range and charge time are just wishful thinking. If you are towing a trailer or have a load on the truck, the range is more likely to be 200 miles than 500. Recharge time is likely to be more like 2 hours than 30 minutes if you use the full range of the vehicle before recharging. There is a video on Youtube where some guys did an experiment using the full towing capacity of an S model and this is the results they got.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Helmich View Post
    Iíd be interested in an electric pick up. 500 mi is as far as I like to go without taking a break to eat and walk around a little, so a 500 mi range and 30 min charge time would work. Assuming there was a charger available at the gas station or whatever. If there was a few people in line that 30 min stop would turn into hours in a hurry.

  15. #180
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,321

    Tesla supercharging times

    Last edited by Jim Matthews; 10-21-2020 at 6:36 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •