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Thread: Finish over wax

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Wenatchee. Wa
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    334

    Finish over wax

    I have a couple of turned pieces that are waxed and am wondering if I could apply a coat of oil based poly and obtain a proper bond. Or does the wax have to be removed and if so how?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Averill Park NY
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    153
    I can not think of any finish that can go over wax.
    Some Blue Tools
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    And a Pet Grizzly
    ShapeokoXL
    Blue and White 50 Watt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    54,227
    Wax is an issue and even double so for anything with polyurethane resin which doesn't even like to stick to itself. You need to thoroughly remove the wax and a barrier coat of wax free shellac before the oil based "poly" or varnish is a good idea. You can use the spray-bomb Zinsser product for convenience...it's great for small jobs like a turning. You do not want a thick coating...thin is best for shellac.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Kopfer View Post
    I have a couple of turned pieces that are waxed and am wondering if I could apply a coat of oil based poly and obtain a proper bond. Or does the wax have to be removed and if so how?
    I think you need to remove the wax. Google solvent for wax on wood for ideas. After removing the wax, I would use sandpaper and perhaps steel wool before applying another finish. I'd probably apply shellac or shallac-based sanding sealer first.

    JKJ

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Elmodel, Ga.
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    583
    i made the mistake of applying a friction polish to a turned vase and then applying epoxy. I knew that the friction polish had a wax base, but thought that since it had been burnished, the epoxy would adhere. I was wrong. Even while rotating slowly on the lathe, the epoxy looked like lines where it ran and would not adhere. Had to scrape it off, re-sand and start over. Lesson learned!
    SWE

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    The times I've removed friction polish or just wax I used multiple solvents then sanded, then repeated.

    Some solvents for different waxes: denatured ethanol or isopropyl alcohol (for the shellac), turpentine (great for beeswax), acetone, naphtha, mineral spirits, ethyl acetate, xylene.

    JKJ

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Wenatchee. Wa
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    334
    Suddenly I think the wax finish is just gear! Thanks for the help.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Kopfer View Post
    Suddenly I think the wax finish is just gear! Thanks for the help.
    This one is maple with nothing but Renaissance wax:

    bud_vase_comp_IMG_8238.jpg

    I sometimes use nothing but beeswax on Eastern Red Cedar:

    cedar_bowl.jpg cedar_lid_comp_IMG_7331.jpg penta_plates_comp_cropped.jpg

    JKJ

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
    Posts
    4,579
    Wax should be removed first....Sorry
    Jerry

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