Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 30 of 30

Thread: Jointing making all boards have crook - Convex side down

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mt Pleasant SC
    Posts
    300
    Just a reminder to press down harder on the outfeed portion of the board once it gets past the cutter.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,261
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce King View Post
    Just a reminder to press down harder on the outfeed portion of the board once it gets past the cutter.
    Thanks, Bruce. One of the things that was really confusing me was doing that seemed to make the problem worse. The trailing roughly 1/3 of the board would just float in mid air and not get jointed when I did that, which made no sense to me at all.
    - I have enough frequent flyer miles to orbit the sun. Sigh...
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off.
    - When you earnestly believe you can compensate for lack of skill by doubling your effort, there's no end to what you can't do

  3. #18
    Alan I thought about that later everyone has some form of fancy dancy new type of cutter and im on 50 year old high speed steel stuff.

    Going by memory ive measured over .003 wear on knives from when first set up with sharp knives. No idea what the carbide stuff does but his table became high in some fashion so what else would cause that? on my machines a table doesnt go up, they are very heavy tables and even when you move one up its too hard to just turn the adjuster so I push on the end of he table with my body then it is easy to turn the adjuster.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,188
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post





    Now the bad news - somehow the locking nut fell off, and I can't figure out how in the world you can get it back on, as the heavy cast iron table rests on the nut with no clearance above. So, likely, with vibrations the setting will change over time again. It was locked down rock hard before I made my adjustments. I put a large piece of sticky ass tape on the knob, and hopefully that will prevent large movement.

    I made a test edge joint, and all looked well.
    I wonder if a drop or two of LocTite will keep the bolt from backing out?

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,261
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Matthews View Post
    I wonder if a drop or two of LocTite will keep the bolt from backing out?
    I thought of that, but am worried that it will be difficult to adjust later if this happens again.

    Is there a type of Loctite that will keep things from moving, but not lock it down if I need to manually turn the knob later?
    - I have enough frequent flyer miles to orbit the sun. Sigh...
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off.
    - When you earnestly believe you can compensate for lack of skill by doubling your effort, there's no end to what you can't do

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    I thought of that, but am worried that it will be difficult to adjust later if this happens again.

    Is there a type of Loctite that will keep things from moving, but not lock it down if I need to manually turn the knob later?
    Yes there is. You want this:


  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,261
    Thanks, Phil.

    So I took out my long digital level, and both the infeed and outfeed table are 0.00 degrees, so no longer any issue that may have existed with the distal end of the outfeed table being higher than the proximal end (I do wish I had thought of measuring it before fixing things.)

    A new issue - for the first time ever on the jointer I am getting a little snipe. One thing I loved about this jointer is that I never got snipe. I am easily getting boards straight now, just with a little snipe on the end.

    BTW, that query about possible cutter wear making the cutters smaller / lower is very interesting. I have been lazy and not periodically moved the fence forward for edge jointing, so wear will be greater on the inside cutters. They are carbide, but I really haven't sent massive amounts of wood through the jointer, so I'm skeptical that they are extremely worn.

    What fine tuning do I need to do now to eliminate that snipe?
    - I have enough frequent flyer miles to orbit the sun. Sigh...
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off.
    - When you earnestly believe you can compensate for lack of skill by doubling your effort, there's no end to what you can't do

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKinney, TX
    Posts
    1,773
    Just raise the outfeed slightly
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  9. #24
    Yep, snipe is just because the outfeed table is a hair too low now. You want the sweet spot where you don't get snipe from being too low, but you don't get the crook in your board from being too high.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,261
    Quote Originally Posted by Stewart Lang View Post
    Yep, snipe is just because the outfeed table is a hair too low now. You want the sweet spot where you don't get snipe from being too low, but you don't get the crook in your board from being too high.
    Yup, that was the ticket. Now perfectly straight cuts, with no snipe, and no crook.

    Of course, there is the matter of that nut that got loose, but I see a Loctite/Permatex purchase in my future.
    - I have enough frequent flyer miles to orbit the sun. Sigh...
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off.
    - When you earnestly believe you can compensate for lack of skill by doubling your effort, there's no end to what you can't do

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mt Pleasant SC
    Posts
    300
    On my Delta the new blades had to be lowered to fix the snipe. The outfeed was good before so I didnít want to move it.

  12. #27
    The outfeed table on the ad941 can be sticky so if the tech wasnít tapping the top of the outfeed with a dead blow to ďsettleĒ itís possible it was adjusted then dropped some, this happened to me on my ad941 and it wasnít until I started wacking it as I was adjusting it that I got it dialed in hasnít moved since

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    I thought of that Glen but the machine was commissioned by Felder upon arrival itís never been moved and I never played with any adjustments so I donít know why it should now be out of alignment suddenly.

  13. #28
    Take a dead blow hammer and wack on either side of the table tracking ways and see if it goes out of adjustment if not then you are good if it did then what I like to do is adjust to the final position on the up not down due to the table sticking on adjustment. So drop it down wack it until it stops moving (use a dial gauge to observe) then adjust on the up, if you go too far and need to drop the table just be sure to wack it the repeat...

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    OK, so I finally found the owner's manual, and adjusted the outfeed table height. It was too high. It was a royal PIA to adjust, because the locking nut must be loosened, and you need a very short metric wrench to reach it.

    So, eventually I got it dialed in per the directions (which tell you to take a "gauge" and have the cutter move it 2-3mm when it is the correct height.

    When I measured that with my digital height gauge, it came out as the exact height of the cutter.

    Now the bad news - somehow the locking nut fell off, and I can't figure out how in the world you can get it back on, as the heavy cast iron table rests on the nut with no clearance above. So, likely, with vibrations the setting will change over time again. It was locked down rock hard before I made my adjustments. I put a large piece of sticky ass tape on the knob, and hopefully that will prevent large movement.

    I made a test edge joint, and all looked well.

    I'll take a digital level to the outfeed table later today to see if it is level or the trailing edge is high as has been suggested by several people.
    Last edited by Mark e Kessler; 09-21-2020 at 9:45 AM.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    562
    Osvaldo has it right. 4/4 anything will flex enough to cause issues with a jointer. The only place you want pressure is where the board is touching the tables. If the board flexes any, it will not flatten. Hard to imagine your jointer just adjusted itself out of alignment.

    Dan

  15. #30
    OP is edge jointing a board, you couldnt make that board flex if your life depended on it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •