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Thread: Jointer/Planer Question

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark e Kessler View Post
    ...Narrow pallet jack is they way to go or the Felder mobility kit...
    I agree but interestingly, 99% of customers would rather buy the mobility kit than buy a pallet jack.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,192
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    I agree but interestingly, 99% of customers would rather buy the mobility kit than buy a pallet jack.
    I've often thought about getting a pallet jack...and what's kept me from doing it is...space to store it and infrequent use. The two times I needed to move the slider (when new and when I cut it down) I rented one, however.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I've often thought about getting a pallet jack...and what's kept me from doing it is...space to store it and infrequent use. The two times I needed to move the slider (when new and when I cut it down) I rented one, however.
    Jim, I don’t know about SCM but with the Felder j/p hardly any space
    274BA09F-A0DD-4988-800A-79265F71B701.jpgA40CCABF-A06C-41AB-BEE5-B6C2DBD11939.jpg

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    396
    Re a wedge, I'm lazy;-) And there has to be a gap to start with, and you gotta guess how hard to drive it in ...

    Or you're thinking under the base itself, not the foot?

    I've measured a difference between the tables when I've moved it. Don't remember numbers, not huge though. Surface gauge and test indicator. While tweaking the tables in, not a daily activity. I'm not *quite* that far gone ... yet.

    Maybe noticeable with a good straight edge? Maybe.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,294
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    I've not personally had an issue with caster-type mobility kits on J/P's (a million customers with Portmate/HTC-type dollies). The worry is more when trying to move the machine off the pallet or pushing it across a concrete floor by itself. I guess if you had casters and were worried about it, you could always drill a couple of holes in the cabinet and mount some generic handle(s) on there. That's pretty much how the Felder AD's are. Just thinking out loud.

    Erik
    Handles would certainly work but the jointer beds are SO convenient.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Crozet, VA
    Posts
    309
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    I agree but interestingly, 99% of customers would rather buy the mobility kit than buy a pallet jack.

    Erik
    I don’t get that either. My narrow pallet jack is one of the best purchases I’ve ever made. To “store it”, I left my drum sander on a pallet and just slide the pallet jack underneath.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,273
    I was very happy I bought a narrow pallet jack when I moved into my workshop. I've used it to fine tune position of tools.

    I just built a riser block for shelving in my garage, with a space underneath so I can store the pallet jack. I don't think anyone has noticed it since.
    - I have enough frequent flyer miles to orbit the sun. Sigh...
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off.
    - When you earnestly believe you can compensate for lack of skill by doubling your effort, there's no end to what you can't do

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,192
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark e Kessler View Post
    Jim, I don’t know about SCM but with the Felder j/p hardly any space
    274BA09F-A0DD-4988-800A-79265F71B701.jpgA40CCABF-A06C-41AB-BEE5-B6C2DBD11939.jpg
    Mark, that's a good idea, but it wouldn't work in my shop because of the shelving I have on "that wall" behind the J/P. This is really more about "my shop" than anything else. I'd really have to keep a pallet jack in the one remaining garage bay. I could probably do that, but it would be really tight, especially in the winter when I have both the ZTR and the Kubota tractor tucked in there. And with only two uses of a pallet jack since the mid 2000s, I don't think a buy would be justified. Maybe for the next shop. LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Arlington, TX
    Posts
    332
    With a good tool/equipment rental place only a mile or so away, renting an engine lift for a day is barely over $40. I used it to get my 850+ pound A3-41 off its shipping pallet, and onto its PM3550 mobile base.

    First, I had to jack up each end of the pallet to create enough clearance for the lift's lower arms with casters to roll under the shipping pallet. I used the 2x4 crate frame lumber to make four sturdy pedestals to securely support the pallet up off the ground.

    I probably should have taken a picture of the rigging, but I started by placing the midpoint of my 4" wide by 20' long tow strap over the outfeed table. I then passed the two ends down on either side of the outfeed table, under the cabinet to the infeed side, and then up, around their respective side of the infeed table. I then fastened the two end loops to the midpoint of the strap with a large shackle, which I also fastened to the lift's chain.

    I had to slide the strap around a little to adjust the lift point side-side and fore-aft, after a few short test lifts showed me where the balance point would be. When lifted, the shackle was about a foot above the jointer tables.

    I removed the 4 sheet metal covers over the front and back jointer table adjustment points before any lifting, to make sure they would not be bent by the strap. I also removed the two screws that fasten the magnetic starter relay box to the frame, so it could slide out of the way, for the same reason. Basically, any point the straps passed over that didn't look heavy enough to withstand the strap's pressure, I removed or adjusted to avoid the straps. I also removed the mounting arm for the euro-guard.

    I can afford to rent that lift several times before I'd be ahead buying one (especially one as heavy duty as the rental lift), and storing one would reduce my already small shop space even further.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    108
    Thanks for this post Andy.
    I’ve got a FS-30 coming soon and have been planning how to get it on the Portamate mobile base I have for it. I hadn’t considered that I may be able to rent a lift so I’ll be making some calls Monday. My primary plan involves my neighbour’s tractor that has a set of forks on it but I like to have a backup plan as well. The lifting method is duly noted.
    I hope my setup goes as smoothly!

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    117
    Thanks for the replies....sounds like staying co-planer is not an issue with these high-quality machines....good to know!

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Arlington, TX
    Posts
    332
    Quote Originally Posted by David Publicover View Post
    Thanks for this post Andy.
    I’ve got a FS-30 coming soon and have been planning how to get it on the Portamate mobile base I have for it. I hadn’t considered that I may be able to rent a lift so I’ll be making some calls Monday. My primary plan involves my neighbour’s tractor that has a set of forks on it but I like to have a backup plan as well. The lifting method is duly noted.
    I hope my setup goes as smoothly!
    You're very welcome, David.

    One thing about the lift: It uses a hydraulic cylinder, that only retracts when you unscrew the relief valve. Some of them are very touchy, and a very slight twist can send a heavy load down very quickly. I was expecting this might happen, and practiced the release during those first short lifts (only a couple inches off the pallet) to find the balance point for the sling.

    I was glad I had done that when I actually set it down on the mobile base.

    Let us know how your lift goes!

    -- Andy - Arlington TX

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    108
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy D Jones View Post
    You're very welcome, David.

    One thing about the lift: It uses a hydraulic cylinder, that only retracts when you unscrew the relief valve. Some of them are very touchy, and a very slight twist can send a heavy load down very quickly. I was expecting this might happen, and practiced the release during those first short lifts (only a couple inches off the pallet) to find the balance point for the sling.

    I was glad I had done that when I actually set it down on the mobile base.

    Let us know how your lift goes!

    -- Andy - Arlington TX
    Thanks! I’ve never used a lift so that’s good information to know. I’m hoping I’ll get it in a couple weeks but it’s hard to know for sure this year as there are many complicating factors.
    Cheers!
    David

  14. #29

    mobility kit

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    I agree but interestingly, 99% of customers would rather buy the mobility kit than buy a pallet jack.

    Erik
    Erik,

    Which Porta Mate mobility kit do they buy for the Hammer A3-41? It moves on four axis vs. just the two that the mobility kit uses with the bar?

    Rod

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,294
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    My SCM/MiniMax J/P has two integrated casters and a "Johnson bar" that both lifts and swivels the machine. The bar is the handle. There's no touching the machine bed. It's not the most elegant method relative to movement for sure to get something placed exactly (I very rarely move my machine and have marked the floor for the exact position it has to be if I do move it out for maintenance, etc.) But the system works. The commercial base I use for my lathe (again very rarely) works the same way.
    It depends on how the machine sits relative to the wall. I'm familiar with the 'Johnson bar' system. I have the short end of the machine against the wall so the lifting/steering bar needs to be on the other short end. The 'Johnson bar' system is optimum if the machine's long side sits against a wall.

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