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Thread: What used to be here?

  1. #1
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    What used to be here?

    Helping a friend restore a trestle table with sentimental value. Everything is going well but there are pieces missing from the bottom stretcher - one (two?) from each end. I would say they have to be wedges but the opening is: 1) horizontal, 2) not tapered, and 3) round on each end. I'm having a hard time visualizing what wedges that fit this space would look like.

    Any thoughts?

    IMG_20200914_154709.jpg

    I have to figure out something to put there, even if it is not what used to be there, so any ideas are welcome.


  2. #2
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    First guess? Tusk tenon.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
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  3. #3
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    The side facing the stretcher will be flat since the rounded area gets hidden. The tenon will be flat on one side and rounded edges on the outside. Some taper needed to tighten.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    First guess? Tusk tenon.
    Agreed. Although I have only ever seen vertical tusk tenons - not horizontal like mine would have to be. Maybe that's why they are missing.

    I did see this picture on the page you linked to, which is an interesting idea:

    forked wedge and dowel.jpg


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce King View Post
    The side facing the stretcher will be flat since the rounded area gets hidden. The tenon will be flat on one side and rounded edges on the outside. Some taper needed to tighten.
    I thought of this too, but wouldn't that always leave a gap on one side of the rounded edge, where one side is tighter and the other looser due to the taper? I don't think that would look good.


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian W Evans View Post
    I thought of this too, but wouldn't that always leave a gap on one side of the rounded edge, where one side is tighter and the other looser due to the taper? I don't think that would look good.
    The idea is that the "wedge" is pulling the tenon through the mortise, so you never want the wedge to hit the part of the hole that is still inside the mortise so the joint stays tight.
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  7. #7
    Ideally, one would taper the outside edge of the slot as well as the wedge, and the maker appears to have done just that in the photo. If so. this could clue you in to the proper taper to make the wedge. No guesswork.

  8. #8
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    You could use the forked wedge but instead of the dowel use a fat dark metal ring.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Giles View Post
    Ideally, one would taper the outside edge of the slot as well as the wedge, and the maker appears to have done just that in the photo. If so. this could clue you in to the proper taper to make the wedge. No guesswork.
    I think that's just the angle of the photo. There is no taper in that opening. I suppose I could make one though.


  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    The idea is that the "wedge" is pulling the tenon through the mortise, so you never want the wedge to hit the part of the hole that is still inside the mortise so the joint stays tight.
    Yes, but I was thinking that, no matter how the wedge was oriented, there would be a gap on one side of the visible end of the mortise since it is not tapered at all.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce King View Post
    You could use the forked wedge but instead of the dowel use a fat dark metal ring.
    Great idea! I'll propose that to my friend. Thanks.


  12. #12
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    Something like this, flat side goes against vertical leg.
    20200916_150003.jpg20200916_145935.jpg20200916_150422.jpg

  13. #13
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    Opposing wedges will provide plenty of clamping strength and fill the gap. When assembled and tight they can be trimmed even.

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