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Thread: Forgot the cap screw slot

  1. #1

    Forgot the cap screw slot

    I'm building a wooden jack and in my haste to get something done last nigh, I forgot to cut the slot for the cap iron screw. I think I can cut it after the fact with a little swearing and hating myself. Being a Krenov style plane, I had also thought to make the cross bar with one flat side, that won't be happening either. Oh well, plane number one is almost done. Next time I get in the shop, I'll get some pics of this baby.

  2. #2
    Hang in there. I can't speak for you, but stuff like this is part of how I learn--

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
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    One of the marks of a true craftsman is not that he doesn't make mistakes, but how well he fixes them.

    Looking forward to pictures!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
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    I had also thought to make the cross bar with one flat side, that won't be happening either.
    Why? And what did you do instead?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  5. #5
    It's further along then this but I worked right up to the buzzer this morning and didn't take more pics. I planed the exterior, cut the slot, made a wedge and stated laying out for the pin. I'll take more pics tonight. The dark looking wood is just the dirty bowling lane wood that hasn't been planed in this picture. Everything will be maple except maybe the pin.


    20200915_183049.jpg20200915_183108.jpg
    Last edited by Richard Hutchings; 09-16-2020 at 9:00 AM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Why? And what did you do instead?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    I had seen a pin somewhere that was square with round ends to fit in the cheeks. I thought it was a good idea. Hopefully I'll make more planes and experiment some more. This one is going to be a round wooden pin.

  7. #7
    I keep trying to do the hand tool thing only but I guess I'm not quite there yet. My saws aren't sharp enough to crosscut in a reasonable amount of time, hence I need a saw vise. I can't plane end grain on this plane for the life of me. I sharpened up my cheap block plane and set it for the lightest cut I could make and just wore myself out trying to get it flat. I squared it up on the TS. It may be because the I have 4 pieces of wood with grain going in every direction. My next plane will be made from one solid block.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Buresh View Post
    One of the marks of a true craftsman is not that he doesn't make mistakes, but how well he fixes them.
    i guess that makes me a true craftsman. I’ve had a lot of practice fixing mistakes and have gotten pretty good at it.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
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    7,532
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Hutchings View Post
    I had seen a pin somewhere that was square with round ends to fit in the cheeks. I thought it was a good idea. Hopefully I'll make more planes and experiment some more. This one is going to be a round wooden pin.
    Don't.

    You cannot jamb a wedge against a round pin. The wedge will eventually develop a groove, and you will then struggle to tighten it sufficiently.

    The Krenov plane is famous for laminated sides, but the true genius of Kenov was his pin, when was shaped into a triangle, with a flat side which trapped the wedge. Here is one I made ...



    Instructions to make this is here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...vSmoother.html

    If you cannot do this, the next best method is to file a flat on a round steel rod - perhaps not a wooden dowel, since this could be weakened by the removal of thickness.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Don't.

    You cannot jamb a wedge against a round pin. The wedge will eventually develop a groove, and you will then struggle to tighten it sufficiently.

    The Krenov plane is famous for laminated sides, but the true genius of Kenov was his pin, when was shaped into a triangle, with a flat side which trapped the wedge. Here is one I made ...



    Instructions to make this is here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...vSmoother.html

    If you cannot do this, the next best method is to file a flat on a round steel rod - perhaps not a wooden dowel, since this could be weakened by the removal of thickness.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    I've been considering this and I think I'll just remove one side and make it right. It's only wood and glue. Thanx

  11. #11
    I have a jack and jointer with the cross-pin & wedge system. Both of them have round cross-pins. Neither one has developed any sign of a groove in the wedge (red oak) and they are my two most used planes. If, after 10 years, they do develop a groove, that is easily rectified with a few swipes of a smoothing plane. In other words, I would not worry about it.

  12. #12
    That's encouraging. I think I'll just go ahead with this plane. My next one will have this feature.
    Last edited by Richard Hutchings; 09-16-2020 at 3:14 PM.

  13. #13
    You don't need to file away much of the cross pin -- even a small flat will give you much more contact area than a completely round pin, and won't compromise strength too much.

    An aside: I'm currently making a plane out of a single block, and I can say that it is much more difficult than making a laminated plane. You still need to cut out the mortise for the cap iron screw -- but on top of that, you have to cut out the entire mortise for the blade.

  14. #14
    I was going to cut the sides from the same block. That would at least maintain grain direction.

  15. Richard, we've sold hundreds (thousands?) of plane kits, and I've built many planes, all with a simple 1/2" dowel for the cross pin. Works fine, not one complaint from a user after all these years. Even with a relatively soft maple wedge and no flat on the pin (it does flatten a wee bit with use). I also advise making the whole plane from a sole-worthy wood (jatoba, jarrah, bubinga if you can get it) to eliminate the need for a separate sole plate. The sole plate and the pivoting cross pin add a quantum level of difficulty to what is a fairly simple build otherwise. Good luck!
    Ron Hock
    HOCK TOOLS

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