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Thread: Hot Melt Glue

  1. #16
    I'm curious to know some of the ways hot melt glue is being used in the workshop. Also, what about cleanup?

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Sterling, Virginia
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    543
    We use one of these at work for packaging. Air and electric. Sticks are 1" Dia. x 3" long. Pumps a lot of glue. hot melt.jpg

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Spillman View Post
    I'm curious to know some of the ways hot melt glue is being used in the workshop. Also, what about cleanup?
    We use a lot of hotmelt on commercial cabs, melamine, particleboard, etc., using wood forumulated sticks. Pretty much never on solids other than for work holding or temporary fixture type stuff. Cleanup is with a chisel but you dont want to get it on any solid wood that will be receiving finish because it can penetrate deep enough to leave a stain youll never get out.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  4. #19
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    Dec 2008
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    WV
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Plummer View Post
    We use one of these at work for packaging. Air and electric. Sticks are 1" Dia. x 3" long. Pumps a lot of glue. hot melt.jpg
    Thats similar to the electric feed gun I had mentioned earlier that used glue slugs.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  5. #20
    When I use hot glue to temporarily hold two things together and I donít want any residue left on them, Iíll first put masking tape on the objects, then put glue on the tape, and stick them together. After Iím done, I pull them apart and remove the tape.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Fort Worth, TX
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    10
    Quote Originally Posted by James Spillman View Post
    I'm curious to know some of the ways hot melt glue is being used in the workshop. Also, what about cleanup?
    In the last two weeks I've used it to mount wide & long boards to a flat piece of melamine to pass through the planer to get a flat face - it scraped right off of the melamine and was machined off of the other face of the board I was working on. For the same oversized boards, I needed a straight edge and was able to use the same method to run them through the table saw - they were too long (80") for the jig I usually use that has dovetail clamps to hold down the piece, and too long to feel good about using my jointer (I'd have to move the jointer to get that much before/aft space, and rig up a bunch of infeed/outfeed support for multiple passes - using the table saw made it easy).

    I also used it to hold a template in place to route a profile because I forgot to get more carpet tape the last time I ran out. I used blue tape to keep it off of my work piece.

    I was slabbing a sweet spalted log and wanted to just take a tiny bit off on the first cut, so I didn't want to waste thickness by trying to miss the screws I usually use, so I hot glued a wide cedar 2x8 on the top to run the mill down for the first cut - was able to minimize waste and it was easy as pie. It helps to have a decent glue gun that can put out glue quickly.

    I have recently seen some black glue sticks that are marketed as sandable that can be used to fill voids super fast.. going to get a few and see how they work - that would be a huge time saver from epoxy - need to research this for myself to see how good it looks after finish, etc..

    It is just another tool to solve the weird problems that come up every so often in the shop - I love being able to solve my own problems.

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