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Thread: Card Scrapers

  1. #16
    Interesting topic. I used to use card scrapers, but stopped. Don't remember why. Sounds like it's time to bring them out again.

    Anyone regularly use a Stanley #80 or #112? I wonder how those really work.

  2. #17
    Join Date
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    So, my woodworking journey involves alot of power tools. Which was great, when I was spitting out furniture to fill my house. My garage is set up full time as a small just under 500 sq. feet shop. But recently, I've been enamored by hand tools. There is really something special about a blade powered by a human, shearing wood fibers. I like that the card scraper is anything but a card and I also like that in order to employ it with integrity, you need to know how to sharpen it and you need to know how to use it. And you may need a bandaid, when the corner bites you, if you don't take off the edges a little. Talk about the simplest of tools. A rectangular sliver of steel with a folded over hook of metal. Pretty incredible stuff.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clifford McGuire View Post
    Interesting topic. I used to use card scrapers, but stopped. Don't remember why. Sounds like it's time to bring them out again.

    Anyone regularly use a Stanley #80 or #112? I wonder how those really work.
    Yep, a #80.. it works very well and I generally enjoy using it. Then again, I have a stack of scrapers in assorted sizes and thicknesses.
    ~mike

    reading. it helps.

  4. #19
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    Jun 2015
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    Northern California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clifford McGuire View Post
    Interesting topic. I used to use card scrapers, but stopped. Don't remember why. Sounds like it's time to bring them out again.

    Anyone regularly use a Stanley #80 or #112? I wonder how those really work.
    I have the Veritas equivalent of the #80 and a Lie Nielsen 112 (also 212). The #80 is easy to set up and works great. Initially the two scraping planes can be frustrating and take a bit of fiddling, but once set up properly work fine.

    I do have my eye on the StewMac scrapers recommended by Jim and Derek, if for no other reason than the simplicity of obtaining a beautiful surface on difficult wood.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
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    St. Albert, Alberta, Canada
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    Scrapers don't need to be just flat, and they can be made from any hard steel; old saw blades, spring steel, black metal banding used for shipping crates, etc.
    In violin making scrapers are all so important:
    https://maestronet.com/forum/index.p...comment-654213
    https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/324928-fingerboard-relief/&tab=comments#comment-524262
    https://maestronet.com/forum/index.p...comment-898037
    https://maestronet.com/forum/index.p...comment-895251
    Last edited by Bill Yacey; 09-10-2020 at 10:41 PM.

  6. #21
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    Scrapers are the most useful and versatile tools. This simple piece of bandsaw blade, de-toothed and flattened ...



    .. shaped with a file ...




    ... makes this ...




    Eventually becomes ...



    Who needs a router ?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Von Bickley View Post
    About a year ago, I was watching You-Tube videos about card scrapers. Was very interesting so I ordered a card scraper and burnisher, and learned how to sharpen one. Didn't have a need for one at that time so I put it aside. I'm working on a project now using red oak and I had some saw/burn marks on some thin strips of the red oak. I thought about the card scraper and got it out. Can a person fall in love with a card scraper? This thing is fantastic. How many of you are using card scrapers and do you have any tips for us?
    I would hate to do any woodturning on platters, bowls, and boxes without my hand scrapers, both StewMac and cabinet scrapers. For woodturning I grind the cabinet scrapers into curved shapes. Saves an INCREDIBLE amount of sanding and lets me start with fine paper instead of coarse.

    scrapers_favorite_IMG_7870.jpg scrapers_.jpg _scrapers_IMG_7818.jpg _scrapers_IMG_7827.jpg

    I use the traditional rectangular scrapers on flat work too, and to resurface my workbench and laminated maple table on occasion.

    JKJ

  8. #23
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    You know, I have an air nibbler... Now I have ideas for custom shaped scrapers, with ease.
    ~mike

    reading. it helps.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    You know, I have an air nibbler... Now I have ideas for custom shaped scrapers, with ease.
    I tried several methods to get curved hand scrapers. The very first time was almost 20 years ago and I used a metal-cutting disk on a Dremel to cut the end off one of those curvy scrapers. I was having a problem with sanding causing heat checks on the inside of an eastern red cedar bowl so I tried this on a whim. It worked so well I was an immediate convert.

    scraper_PB054025_s.jpg

    I bought a couple of sets of small scrapers which had some with curves, one from Highland Hardware and one from Woodcraft. The problem is these are thinner than I prefer.

    Then I tried shaping curves on traditional card scrapers with the bench grinder and it got the metal too hot, at least I thought.

    What I do now is shape with a 1" belt sander with a coarse belt, 80 or 60 grit I think. This doesn't heat the metal significantly. Then I use a fine CBN wheel to dress the curve and resharpen as needed, followed by file, fine diamond hone, and burnishing.

    scraper_CBN_IMG_7894.jpg

    BTW, it seems to me the better quality "name brand" scrapers work better than the cheap ones. Imagine that.

    JKJ

  10. #25
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    Card scrapers are like other types of tools, where you decide one day to take whatever time it takes to learn to prep it and use it. At least for me. I spent the better part of a few days watching every video I could find and giving it a try. Sometimes frustrating, ultimately very rewarding. Now that I have the confidence to prep one well, it (and other scrapers from an old saw plate) are used often.

    Using them actually drove me to buy an angle grinder to cut up the old saw plate. I have no doubt that the thicker Stew Mac will be ordered in the future.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Aiken, SC & Cartersville, GA
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    I have also found scrapers to be invaluable when working on the lathe. Saves lots of time.

  12. #27
    I use card scrapers. Beware of the cheap ones, they don't hold an edge worth a crap. I very had really good luck with the Two Cherries and Lie Nielsen cards scrapers. While it may seem expensive try to think of the cost spread over 10+ years.
    The other scraper i'd recommend is a Stanley no 80 (available cheap all over) or the Veritas version of it. Easy to sharpen and sethe up.


    My experience is thus:
    If you're seeing things over 1/8", you're probably best hitting it with some light passes from a plane
    Like any other hand tools, they take some practice to get decent with
    They leave a finish ready surface when you use them right
    Take long passes -- don't just focus in one little area

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
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    St. Albert, Alberta, Canada
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    Sandvik makes some good quality scraper stock. It's quite hard, so I score it with a dremel cutoff wheel and snap it in the vice jaws to size it for the job.

    If you cut right through it, it removes the temper from too much heat.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Yacey View Post
    Sandvik makes some good quality scraper stock. It's quite hard, so I score it with a dremel cutoff wheel and snap it in the vice jaws to size it for the job.
    If you cut right through it, it removes the temper from too much heat.
    Do you remember what the scraper stock is called? I saw Sandvik scrapers but none that said "stock". Is what you use a specific type of scraper? What's the thickness?

    I bought some O1 oil-hardening steel bar 1/8" thick and hope to find time to cut out some curved scraper shapes with the plasma cutter and harden the steel. They should work much like the StewMac scrapers but a fraction of the cost.

    JKJ

  15. #30
    Card scrapers are especially helpful for surfacing solid edge banding, which is usually glued on just proud of the veneer.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

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