Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Minimax CU300 Shaper Ring Insert Removal

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    822

    Minimax CU300 Shaper Ring Insert Removal

    I have used the shaper on my combo machine several times by removing couple of the rings. I tried to remove the very last one shown in the picture below and have not been able to do so. Which made me think perhaps the last one is not removable. Is that the case or do I need to resort to some brute force to remove it?

    2E61D6DD-DFD3-4955-8DA5-6F152C2F0557.jpeg

  2. #2
    I've never seen a ring of that type that wasn't removable . But I guess you could use a mirror to see what the bottom
    looks like. Rings are made of pretty soft stuff, you have to be careful with them. Some of us have seen some with hundreds of wrench or hammer dings. Many commercial shop foremen under pressure from above will ignore such
    nuttiness

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,461
    I can't see that insert not being removable.

    Try to gently pull it up with a slide hammer.

    I waxed mine so they come apart easier............Rod.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,818
    I have a Minimax T 50 shaper that looks exactly like that . The rings are tight. It does come out,once it is out clean it and the ledge with lacquer thinner. I pull up on it with my hands alternating sides till I get movement. When I re- install it I tap it in with a rubber mallet.

  5. #5
    Frank, I remember this being a "thing" with those rings. The Felders can be tight, too. They don't want them to rattle, so the machining tolerances are snug. What I would do is lower the spindle all the way down and see if you can tap it out with a rubber mallet from the inside edge. Use the handle as a lever and tap on the head with a hammer. Or perhaps a small ball peen hammer from underneath, tapping lightly. You could make a poor man's slide hammer out of a stick of wood and a dowel. Yank it sharply from above. What I have done in the past is dress the inside and outside edges of those rings with some emery paper afterward. I like Rod's idea about the wax. Hope this helps,

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  6. #6
    many shapers have a lever arm front or back you have to move that arm to loosen the insert. is there a lever front or back?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    many shapers have a lever arm front or back you have to move that arm to loosen the insert. is there a lever front or back?
    Unfortunately, not on these types of machines.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    56,939
    The hammer method seems viable, but I'd use a plastic coated dead blow or a brass head hammer rather than a steel head hammer for the required "persuasion".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    822
    Thanks for all the ideas. Tried the hammer method and it is not moving at all. Put some oil around the outer edge (where the insert meets the cast iron top) to see if it helps loosen things up, but no luck so far.

    I am thinking about heating with a heat gun to see it if helps.

  10. #10
    Those aluminum rings aren't anodized, so get a white cakey oxidation if they are in a humid shop. After it has soaked in Kroil or whatever, you might try setting small pieces of dry ice all around the ring. Or, rent a wheel puller from Autozone, flip the jaws, and center it with a piece of wood on top of the spindle.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  11. #11
    you have to be perfectly parallel when you come up or they will jam

    If there is a way you can take advantage of the spindle and some blocking and turning it up then you can crank that and put force on it from below. I had one cutter head that used to jam so I raised it up put wood blocks on the top table then lowered the spindle on top of it and it came off instantly, otherwise impossible. Just a lock edge head that someone had put a sleeve in and was off a hair too tight. my machines are old ive never seen aluminum used before.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    ...If there is a way you can take advantage of the spindle and some blocking and turning it up then you can crank that and put force on it from below. I had one cutter head that used to jam so I raised it up put wood blocks on the top table then lowered the spindle on top of it and it came off instantly...
    That's an awesome idea! I would try it.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,315
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Martin View Post
    Thanks for all the ideas. Tried the hammer method and it is not moving at all. Put some oil around the outer edge (where the insert meets the cast iron top) to see if it helps loosen things up, but no luck so far.

    I am thinking about heating with a heat gun to see it if helps.
    I'd suggest that heat will tighten the insert even more as it would expand.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    822
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    you have to be perfectly parallel when you come up or they will jam

    If there is a way you can take advantage of the spindle and some blocking and turning it up then you can crank that and put force on it from below. I had one cutter head that used to jam so I raised it up put wood blocks on the top table then lowered the spindle on top of it and it came off instantly, otherwise impossible. Just a lock edge head that someone had put a sleeve in and was off a hair too tight. my machines are old ive never seen aluminum used before.
    This ended up being very effective after significant amount of tapping with a ball peen hammer from under the insert.

    Thank you for the great idea, Warren!

    I ended up sanding the edges of the largest insert quite a bit for it to fit easier. Also waxed all the inserts to avoid future problems.

  15. #15
    Hi Frank

    glad that worked. I tend to polish stuff with Scotchbrite burgundy a fair bit as things will get more smooth and shine but not change dimensions too much.

    I also do some filing. Depending on the machine there are sometimes some sort of sharp edges on things, say done at the factory but they are on a time frame and if we give a bit of attention to breaking those sort of sharp edges and it makes no difference to how things work then ill lightly tweak those. Ill also file outside table edges and more, some brands can use it more than others. I enjoy the filing if I had a good sharp file.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •