Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Finger groove router bit

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vadnais Heights, MN
    Posts
    1,610

    Finger groove router bit

    Hey all,

    Trying to fix a chest of drawers for some friends and it has a finger groove like this.

    649633C0-00D0-4838-991F-34D4F6CA713B.jpg

    This is a cabinet that was hand made and itís very well done. Just wondering if I can buy a bit for this as I havenít found anything in the searches Iíve done.

    The finger grip on one of the doors broke off and I was hoping to replicate it.

    Thanks!
    Doug Swanson

    Where are John Keeton and Steve Schlumpf anyway?

  2. #2
    It looks like a 1/2 bullnose on an angle. The bit isn't the problem so much as the angle, which would require an awful long bit. If it was machine made, it likely was a shaper set up on an angle, or maybe one of those old table saw moulding head blades at an angle (kind of terrifying to think of actually).

    If I had to do something like this as a one-off, I would likely rough out the grove with a table saw a 45 degree angle with successive cuts, and then make a custom scraper out of an old saw blade to complete the rounding, unless by luck you have a moulding plane the right size. A rasp or rat tail file might work as well, as would maybe a carving chisel.
    Last edited by Andrew Seemann; 09-03-2020 at 12:57 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,896
    Go to this page and look for part number 7857 -- https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...er_pull_anchor

    It will cut that groove. But you do have to tilt the router over at 45 degrees or so. It isn't as tricky as you might think. You can build a sub-base to do it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON Canada
    Posts
    1,404
    I would use a core box bit, like one of these

    https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...s?item=16J1556

    Cut a wedge at the angle that you want the the "slot" to be, attach the piece with double-sided tape, and run it in successively deeper passes on a router table.
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,588
    Agree with Grant...but will also mention you may need to do multiple passes which makes it a bit more fun. Hogging it out in one pass may be a challenge, however, based on that photo. It's a lot of material and the angle makes it effectively a much deeper cut.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,699
    Blog Entries
    1
    The depth of cut looks like it would eliminate any router bit if that groove is the 3/4"-ish size it appears. The geometry would require a tilted arbor if you are looking to do that by machine. You may want to consider an operation that would give the "look" when the drawer is closed. My first thought is to find someone with a tilting head shaper or go the tilted dado head on the tablesaw followed by a shop made plane or scraper as discussed. We all tend to think of solutions based on our experiences. I look forward to the response that makes me smack my forehead ans say "of course!". You know it's out there ;-)
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 09-03-2020 at 11:02 AM.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vadnais Heights, MN
    Posts
    1,610
    Thanks for all the replies. I think I have one of the core box bits somewhere so I might try that route.

    All of the drawers and doors on this cabinet have this kind of pull. The handle part on one of the doors broke off so Iím going to sacrifice the face material on the bottom drawer to fix it. Iím hoping to be able to recreate a new face (or something close) for the bottom drawer face.....
    Doug Swanson

    Where are John Keeton and Steve Schlumpf anyway?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,588
    Can you inlay new material from the rear and re-cut the pull without touching the face? Use the same species and the only time the fix might be visible is when the door is open and you can see the backside.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    Here's a thought. Cut a flat bottomed groove with a dado set tilted to 45 degrees. With a core box bit and a piece of like material make an insert that forms the arched bottom and glue it in. Or make the insert in two pieces with a cove bit.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vadnais Heights, MN
    Posts
    1,610
    I appreciate the replies so far. Hereís some better pictures of what Iím trying to fix.

    This picture shows the good door along with the door with the broken finger grip.
    73D08C60-9B1A-4225-AD06-F020B568FA3A.jpg

    Thereís one door on each side of the cabinet as seen here.

    BAE2D0D7-9161-477E-847A-097EB54B323D.jpg

    This picture shows the bottom drawer where I was hoping to cut off the finger grip to fix the door. My thought was then to make a new drawer face since itís more hidden and would be less noticeable if it wasnít an exact match.
    575D3530-DF62-456E-9B6D-E21927BF1D5E.jpg

    My thought was to rip the broken part of the door off right where it starts to angle. Then cut the replacement piece from the bottom drawer and glue it onto the door.

    I would the make a new drawer face and route a finger grip that matches (or is similar to) the doors.

    Thoughts?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Doug Swanson

    Where are John Keeton and Steve Schlumpf anyway?

  11. #11
    That likely came of off a tilting shaper. Maybe a tablesaw with a moulding head. It's not a router cut.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,222
    I would not sacrifice the drawer front. That would just make a bigger job out of it. I'd make a new piece and glue it on where the old one broke off. Since it is visually discontinuous the difference in the finish will be less noticeable. And the new part will be much easier to make. Start with 8/4 material and make the groove straight into the edge, then cut it at 45. Start this effort on paper.

    Plan to test a few finishes on test parts till you get it close. Give yourself a couple of weeks for this.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vadnais Heights, MN
    Posts
    1,610
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    I would not sacrifice the drawer front. That would just make a bigger job out of it. I'd make a new piece and glue it on where the old one broke off. Since it is visually discontinuous the difference in the finish will be less noticeable. And the new part will be much easier to make. Start with 8/4 material and make the groove straight into the edge, then cut it at 45. Start this effort on paper.

    Plan to test a few finishes on test parts till you get it close. Give yourself a couple of weeks for this.
    That's a good suggestion and I like that idea. The problem is I believe this is made out of redwood (thatís what the customer told me) but I donít know for sure. Iím in Minnesota so we donít have a big supply of redwood 😉

    Iím far from an expert when it comes to identifying wood and I certainly donít know much about matching the finish. Thatís why I was looking at using the drawer from because then everything on top would be a sure match and the drawer could be a close match and not look as bad.

    Fortunately I have some time to sort things out....
    Doug Swanson

    Where are John Keeton and Steve Schlumpf anyway?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,215
    Cutting that deep with a extended bit will load the bit a lot. I would rough it out with a tablesaw tilted at the angle first then just a finish pass with a router. Probably at least two passes until full depth.
    Bil lD

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •